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Hi all,

Please don't think I only post when I have a problem; it's just that I only post when I have a problem(!).

Does anyone have any idea how to shift the oil filter. Owners manual refers to Honda special tool, which I don't have. It will not budge by hand and I don't want to attack it in case I make things worse. Last year a bunch of us had a collective service day when we were supervised by a profession bike (wing ) mechanic. Had the same problem then. The mech had a tool (made it himself) which was similar to a metal lid about three quarters inch deep which was hexagon-shaped (think it was hexagon) to fit the flats on the filter. The lid had an eccentric flat bar welded to it to aid leverage. He said he used this because the Honda tool was not up to the job. Anyway, the filter wasso tight that the tool started to round-off the flats on the filter. The solution was that rag was stuffed in the tool to make a closer fit, the tips of 2 screwdrivers were inserted to compensate for the rounded flats, and the eccentric handle was whacked with a hammer. It worked but it took two of us and was not easy even then; and the filter was a mess. Is there an easier method than this?
 

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A large water pump pliers will do the job, and wiothout having to remove the lower cowl too. Works every time. You can actually buy a special tool evencheaper that looks like a large ring spanner and it fits perfectly over the filter flats, never slips or wears and I think can be had for about 10 quid from Appleyards, HGB etc.
 

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Jason, Many thanks, I'll give it a whirl. Colin
 

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You're not likely to hurt anything twisting on the oil filter. In a real pinch you can drive a screwdriver through the filter, near it's closed end and twist it off. I say in a real pinch because it can be a bit messy. I'm not all that familiar with the 1800 but on the 1800 there's plenty of room to get a strap wrench on the filter. Any car parts store worth it's salt ought to have a filter wrench that will fit. Probably cheaper than anything you could get from a motorcycle shop.
 

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Paul, The 1800 oil filter faces forward on front left of engine. The gap between the filter and engine casing is very narrow so that, for example, a chain wrench cannot encircle it. A strap wrench can but when I tried it last time the strap slipped, no matter how tight it was. I think a period of experimentation is called for.
 

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The more I hear the more I think the 1500 is the bike for a guy who does his own work. I know the 1800 is a magnificent machine, but it's getting awfully complicated. That's mainly why I went from the 1200 SEI to the 1500. The 1500 is basically a simpler bike. Two carbs are easier to keep happy than four, there's a lot less electronics andaccess to the various parts seems easier. The 1500 won't perform up to the 1800 or even the LTD/SEI for that matter, but it's plenty fine for me. Don't need no steeenking wrench to pull the filter on my bike, just grab it and twist!
 

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The special tool that Jason mentioned will fit both the gl1500 and gl1800 filters and you don't need to remove the cowl to do it. It's well worth the money (if I had a 6 cylinder Wing that is).
 

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Well, the deed is done, but not without a considerable amount of difficulty. First I tried a sort of strap wrench called a 'Baby Boa' which I bought from amotoring accessories chain store, supposedly suitable for all manner of motoring and domestic tasks. Result: the reinforced(!) rubber strapsnapped; got my money back after declining a replacement.

Then borrowed heavy duty strap wrench from a mechanic pal; had to remove front lower cowling to allow ratchet access. Result: the webbing strapstarted to crush the filter but without budging it.

Next borrowed heavy duty filter pliers. Had to remove long lower left cowling to improve access for pliers and both hands. Yes, it needed the strength of both hands and I am not exactly a weakling. Just as the filter body started to buckle it decided to surrender and that was that. Hardly believeable really; I know that filter was only hand-tight originally and, as I said on a previous posting, I had difficulty removing the one before that.:weightlifter:Many thanks to everyone who helped, I live and learn.
 

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Probably obvious, but make sure you smear a light oil film on the gasket of the new filter, and don't overtighten. Usually following filter supplier recommendation is fine.
 

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Yep, did that and did it up hand-tight, although the owners' manual states 'Using a special tool and a torque wrench tighten to 26 N.m (2.6kgf.m, 19 lbf.ft).' I have read elsewhere, either on this site or a link (can't recall) on the topic of oil filters that nobody owned up to following Honda's advice in this respect and other contributers did the same as me. Just a thought, as a rough average does anyoneknow the torque equivalent of 'hand-tight'? Or is this a silly question.:baffled:
 

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Spin on oil filters are spin on oil filters whether bike, car or truck. oil the seal, spin it on and give it 1/8th to 1/4 turn after it makes contact. Should be nice and snug, not as tight as you can screw it on by hand or you will have fun getting it off. By all means soak the filter with new oil and fill it as full as you can without spilling it when installing. Crank the bike with the kill switch off until the oil pressure warning goes off to get the air out of the system and then fire it up, let it run 5 minutes or enough to warm up and check for leaks. Very bad manners to put a dry filter on and then start the bike up.
 

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Thanks Paul, I must admit to not pre-loadng the filter. I am suitably admonished
 

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Hey colbee :leprechaun: This is the answer to all your problems. Big Bike store this spanner and it costs only $10.75. :clapper:

:weightlifter::18red::weightlifter:
 

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Much obliged redwing. Never before in the field of motorcycling has so much been learned by one person in such a short time -only since accessing this page.
 

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colbee wrote:
Much obliged redwing. Never before in the field of motorcycling has so much been learned by one person in such a short time -only since accessing this page.
Hey colbee :waving: Your welcome. :clapper:I have all these guys well taught. :weightlifter:

:leprechaun::18red::leprechaun:
 

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A little trick I have used with a metal strap oil wrench that slipped when removing a oil filter was to get a piece of sand paper and fold it so the grit was facing the filter and the strap. It gripped everthing and I was able to unscrew the filter.
 

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Hi Jim,

The only thing in my case was not slippage but that the strap was crushing the filter without moving it. Still, all's well that ends well and adds to life's rich tapestry, albeit a little frayed in places.
 

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Colbee, what I've used on disposable filters is a strap wrench sold by Sears that has a reinforced ruberized strap that is fully adjustable and came as a set of two, one small and one large. Both work great and have found them very useful on all sort of projects from plumbing to cars and the RV. It seems to work better than most strap type affairs and I've found it works great on oil filters. Here in the US they sell for about $20 a set. I've even used the big one to hold the water pump pulley on a truck so that we could break the fan loose from it. I wouldn't give these strap tools up for anything. Also, the way they are made, they don't scratch up what you are working on.:)

Gene:waving::11red::11red::11red::cooler:
 

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Thanks Gene,

This is all grist to the mill. The info available on thisforum is incredible and everyone is so helpful; I really appreciate all the advice I have been given.
 

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Redwing wrote:
Hey colbee :leprechaun: This is the answer to all your problems. Big Bike store this spanner and it costs only $10.75. :clapper:

:weightlifter::18red::weightlifter:

That's the one all right Redwing. No need to remove the cowl and fits perfectly. I wouldnt use anything else as there is no fear of tearing or crushing the filter with this baby.
 
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