Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

61 - 80 of 112 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,828 Posts
Well now, with the wire attached, the meter reads 14.6 volts, + or -. And you're right, it bypasses the ignition switch.

However, without the jumper, it's charging 16 volts, + or -. So I've got it back on the charger and I'll do the test again, after it goes into float mode. It took some cranking to get it to start so I figure the battery may be down a bit.

So, it seems there is a discrepancy, but maybe not enough. Where are the grounds you refer to, Mike?
If the black jumper wire fixes the issue the ground is not a cause. The issue is a bad path from the battery to the reg on the black wire. wire. Nothing wrong with 14.6 volts at the battery.
 

·
Administrator
02 GL1800 w/Auto Pilot
Joined
·
60,922 Posts
Dennis,
you need to put that black sense wire onto the power lead coming out of the Ignition switch.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,828 Posts
Here is one fix if you want to go this way. It beats changing ignition switch etc. We will just add this relay and use it for a switch instead if the ignition. It is pretty easy fix and will act just like you are putting the jumper on but only when the ksy is turned on. When the ignition is off the relay will turn off.

Wire as follows:
Terminal 85: Wire this to anything that is hot with the ignition key on. .No power with key off. No fuse should be required as one already exists in the bikes fuse box.

Terminal 86: Just ground this terminal wherever it is convenient.

Terminal 87: This wire will go from this terminal (87) To the black wire at the reg.

Terminal 30 : This wire will go from the battery positive to terminal 30. An easier place to get to the battery voltage for this wire is at the solenoid. Connect one end to the stud of the battery cable. Not the starter cable. For safety it would not be a bad idea to install a fuse as close as possible to the stud. A 5 amp fuse should be heavy enough.

Terminal 87a: This terminal is a dud and the wire can be removed if you want.

Mount the relay with the wires down so water and rain can not get in the relay.

So when you turn on the ignition switch the terminals 85 and 86 will turn on the relay. This will allow sensor power to flow from the battery cable, through the fuse and relay to the reg. You can leave the OEM wiring as is. This is just a redundant circuit and there is no need to cut any OEM wiring.
Here is a link for the relay. To make it easy you might want to buy the pigtail as well.

324098
 

·
Administrator
1987 GL1200 Interstate
Joined
·
23,012 Posts
Discussion Starter · #64 ·
Not big on altering things. Maybe as a temp, but...

Are you saying the change in charging voltage indicates an ignition fault? Does that mean putting in a new switch will fix the problem?

I have found a place with a new OEM regulator, but you seem to be saying the regulator isn't the problem, correct?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,828 Posts
Dennis,
If adding the jumper wire from the battery to the reg black wire results in lower battery voltage the answer is that there is a voltage drop on the black wire somewhere. The most common place is the ignition switch in my experience. The other 2 most likely places are the right multifunction switch switch or fuse box issue.
In a nutshell you have lower voltage at the black wire than the battery. To fix the issue those two voltages should match.
If you want to chase the issue down I would go to the ignition switch. With your voltmeter set in the lowest range DC volts test between the red and black wires I would expect a very low read of .1 volts etc. if the switch is good. Key on of course.

Just realized I have been calling it the black wire when technically the wire at the reg is black with a light green stripe.
 

·
Administrator
02 GL1800 w/Auto Pilot
Joined
·
60,922 Posts
Dennis,
this is one time you need to quit fussing about adding something on to the bike.
just get the relay, and do what Redwing52 says.

it will correct the problem with the Regulator getting false information FOREVER.

Honda did NOT get it right with this one.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,158 Posts
Not big on altering things. Maybe as a temp, but...

Are you saying the change in charging voltage indicates an ignition fault? Does that mean putting in a new switch will fix the problem?
It could be an accumulation of voltage drops with the switch and the multiple connections between the battery and the regulator. A relay in the black wire between the ignition switch and the fuse box might even make everything work better.
 
  • Like
Reactions: redwing52

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,828 Posts
Dennis,
If you are concerned about modifications to the OEM wiring the connections could be made using "Tee pins". In the event you want to remove it you could just take everything off and fill the pin holes in the wire with figernail polish. No cutting or soldering required. Just 2 pin holes in the OEM wires.
 

·
Administrator
1987 GL1200 Interstate
Joined
·
23,012 Posts
Discussion Starter · #69 ·
Something I don't quite understand is; if I add the relay, will I need to put a toggle somewhere to turn off the ignition?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,158 Posts
Something I don't quite understand is; if I add the relay, will I need to put a toggle somewhere to turn off the ignition?
Not if it's wired right. I would do something different if it were mine, I would wire the relay where it powers everything except the ignition by tapping into the black wire to the fuse box. This makes everything have full power and takes most of the load off the switch. Like in Mikes post, fused battery power to terminal 30, disconnect black wire in connector to the fuse box and connect the end from the switch to terminal 85, end to the fuses to 87 and ground 86.
 
  • Like
Reactions: redwing52

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,828 Posts
Something I don't quite understand is; if I add the relay, will I need to put a toggle somewhere to turn off the ignition?
You would be doing Bike a favor if you do the relay as described and hook the black wire like Dave said. You will take a lot of load off the ignition swish and give full power to accessories' like lights etc. If you do that it will be wired similar to a GL1500.

The way it works now ie when you turn on the key all the power for the accessories' has to go through the ignition switch. That is a fairly heavy load for the switch to handle. Once the relay is installed the ignition switch will turn on the relay ( almost no power) and the relay will send power to all the accessories. I can draw you a picture. I know how much you like my art work. 😎
 

·
Honda Guru
Joined
·
2,069 Posts
I don’t know if y’all know but I’d been servicing Yuasa batteries since 1970 in Honda dealerships and later on in my own shop. They were all acid batteries then and when they went to the ‘maintenance free’ version they are all shipped dry. The shop or customer has to install the acid and install the cover prior to installing the battery. Just like the old batteries it’s required that the battery sit after installing the acid pack. Sitting overnight was recommended by Yuasa but an hour will suffice. At this point the cover should be installed. Then the battery needs to be charged prior to installing it in the bike.
I retired from the bike biz in 2004 but all Honda’s used the Yuasa batteries up to that time. All came to the dealership with the battery dry and the package of acid separately.
 

·
Administrator
1987 GL1200 Interstate
Joined
·
23,012 Posts
Discussion Starter · #73 ·
Another question is: Would a Mofset regulator help with the overcharge?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
27,158 Posts
Another question is: Would a Mofset regulator help with the overcharge?
Probably, they don't use the black wire. The thing is using a relay would be better overall. It takes the load off you probably failing ignition switch.
 

·
Administrator
1987 GL1200 Interstate
Joined
·
23,012 Posts
Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Okay, I just don't understand electrics very well, and the 14.6 volts still seems too high.
 

·
Honda Guru
Joined
·
2,069 Posts
I’d rather have the cut-out voltage a little lower... say 14.2vdc. It might work ok with a mat battery. In most cases new connections are an upgrade over the old corroded connections.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,828 Posts
Early on, the rectifier was a stand-alone device. Alongside it, most charging systems also used a regulator to control the alternator’s output. A lot of British bikes used a Zener diode, which in essence was nothing more than a preset electrical switch that monitored voltage. If the voltage was under 14 volts, the Zener turned off and all current was sent to the battery. When the electrical demand was low and charging voltage approached 15 volts, the Zener turned on and routed most current to ground. It wasn’t a great system and is no longer used, but it did work.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,723 Posts
Okay, I just don't understand electrics very well, and the 14.6 volts still seems too high.
My several cars and the trike all seem to agree 13.6-14.0 is a sweet spot. 14.2 -14.6 is normal just after a big drain like start, but soon … very soon after that it's back "at" or "under" 14.0.
 
61 - 80 of 112 Posts
Top