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Recently installed a Hondaline CB in the Wing (what a job) and now that it is done I'm not sure I'm happy about it. Range appears to be good for only a short distance. Does anyone know if these units can be calibated or something to increase the effectiveness? What CB channel is most used by cyclist and does that change around the country? Ride Hard.
 

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You needed to adjust the SWR of the cb before you buttoned everything back up as you needed access to the antenna leads to do this. I could do it for ya but Iowa is a bit of a ride from here.
 

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Thanks for the get back Michael. Is there an online help site that I could read up on doing this? The installation instructions didn't say anything about a SWR adjustment. Imagine that - poor instructions!
 

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SWR tuning is about all you can do, range will probably vary depending on where you are passing through at the time.
 

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joycelenz wrote:
Thanks for the get back Michael. Is there an online help site that I could read up on doing this? The installation instructions didn't say anything about a SWR adjustment. Imagine that - poor instructions!
Welcome to this Great Site!

Pull up a chair and join on in!

Ride Safe, Ray


:waving:
 

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I had heard (read) some where that channel 12 was supposedly used by motorcyclist. But I would think channel 19 is your best bet as this is some what the standard of what the truckers use. That means any one looking for "road" information from the truckers (including other truckers) will be monitoring channel 19.
 

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joycelenz wrote:
Recently installed a Hondaline CB in the Wing (what a job) and now that it is done I'm not sure I'm happy about it. Range appears to be good for only a short distance. Does anyone know if these units can be calibated or something to increase the effectiveness? What CB channel is most used by cyclist and does that change around the country? Ride Hard.




There are many factors that will determine the performance of your CB unit.

With an assumption that there is no need for a transmitter/receiver alignment procedure (yours, as most, wouldprobablybenefit from one) then the issue fallson coax and antenna to complete the circuit. Properly conducting grounds are essential to performance. Coax type and length will affect performance. Antenna type and placement will affect performance. RG-58 coax using a base-fed, center-loaded 1/4 wave vertical is the most common M/C antenna used. Matching the coax and antenna (each adjusted by length) to a CB unit is accomplished using a (V)SWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio, commonly called SWR) Meter. There is a procedure in its use, but the target Ratiois 1.5 to 1 or less. 1 to 1 is the ideal theoreticalmatch, though rarely achieved, 'specially on a bike. With another assumption that all istuned to a acceptable match then there opens the possibility of circuit enhancements within the unit itself. Alignment procedures and circuit modifications are beyond the capabillities of most riders, and a competent RF Techwould be needed. **No licensed Two-Way Radio shop can modify or alter your unit, and though capable of alignment precedures, they probably won't touch it. Antenna matching is well within the aptitudes of most all of us riders. Inexpensive SWR meters can be found at Radio Shack and via e-Bay (sub $20 range) and elsewhere.

In my experience, your local HAM Radio Club/Operator or CB Aficionado would be more than eager to help you with your bike. I emphasize HAM Radio Operator. Proper set-up during the installation of equipmentis key to performance.

Here is a good step-by-step GL antenna tune procedure:
http://www.angelfire.com/ok4/wingman26/swr.html
Here is a good step-by-step GL CB antenna install:
http://goldwing.eurekaboy.com/cbantenna.htm

All that being said: A good working factory radio with aproperly tuned antenna is quite effective for our needs.



The GWRRA national road frequency is channel 1.

Different Chapters may use different channels though usually stay between 1 and 5.

Group rides have a channel determined by the CD, Road Captain, by vote, or by the guy that swears a given channel is the best for the ride they're doing.

Channel 19 is the most active channel on our highways, and generally monitored by all, and probably your best bet until you know different.

Channel 9 is set aside for Emergency use and is usually monitored by various groups interested in support of that. State Police/Troopers and REACT (Radio Emergency AssociatedCommunications Teams) being the primary ones.

Your Local CB Enthusiasts will have a couple of channels in use. One below channel 23 and one above. Many old-school CB'ers use the vintage 23 channel-only equipment. Others use the sidebands in the channels 36-40 range, generallylower sideband.

Channels 28 & 30 are generally "Family" channels.

Channel 6 is considered the "Big Radios Only" channel.

Channel 14 usually gets "walkie-talkie" activity.

Channels 16 & 26 may have local enthusiast activity for you, and everyone else.


I hope this was helpful.
 

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Thanks Capt. for the channel lineup! That was interesting to read. When our group..the SERRASJ...we normally use channel 22. Why?:stumped: Don't really know, we just do.

When I ride with the local PGR group on missions, we usually use channel 23. Again...I don't know why..we just do.

I know it is all preference within the group that is riding and have heard the National channel is 1. When I travel as a single bike, I will use channel 19 on the interstates. Some interesting conversations sometimes on that channel nowadays:shock:. I guess the FCC doesn't monitor it like they used to when CB's were a big thing and everyone had them at home and in the vehicles. I remember you used to have to register a call sign (ours was KSK3949). My father's "handle" was Big Dipper, my mother's wasLady Dipper, and I was Little Dipper. We had a base station and a CB ineach vehicle.:waving:
 

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Snorebaby wrote:
I remember you used to have to register a call sign (ours was KSK3949). My father's "handle" was Big Dipper, my mother's wasLady Dipper, and I was Little Dipper. We had a base station and a CB ineach vehicle.:waving:

Snorebaby... With the your childhood comms experience, this may or may not interest you:

General Mobile Radio Service:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Mobile_Radio_Service

Your Neighborhood:
http://www.northgeorgiagmrs.com/



Not certain if you fall within their repeater coverage area, but they'll know.




....them cellular phones, they's just fancy-dancy radios....
 

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Rhinos typically run on Channel 1, we have used Channel 4 when there is a lot of traffic or skip on channel 1. When by myself on the road, I'll listen to 19 until I get tired of it. KFH5137 said that and I'm gone!
 

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Just accept the fact that the effective range of a motorcycle mounted CB radio is measured in yards, not miles.
 

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On items mentioned above that will really knock-down range is the "skip" factor -- CB is one of the lower frequency bands (on the lower side of HF and VHF) that tends to 'bounce' or 'skip' off of a few layers of the ionosphere...

... not that theory is relevant, but the base radio-noise level for some conditions is so 'loud' that folks trying to listen to ya can't hear over the noise levels.

Properly tuned and in favorable conditions, the bike CB does reasonably well. I often chat with an old friend about 15 miles South of my east-west ride home. However, there are days (weeks on end sometimes) that there's simply too much noise in the CB-band to communicate more than a mile or so.

In my time workign with the OEM CBs on Wings, the #1 issue (after antennas being out of tune or not grounded properly) is that the microphones just don't seem to drive the CB hard enough (low modulation levels) - As CaptMidnight posts -- most often a professional 'tuning' of your transceiver will often set this to rights.


some reading on the propogation stuff: http://www.hamqsl.com/solar.html
 

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The Honda CB on the GL1800 has less range than on the GL1500, most say it is because of the aluminum alloy frame. Looping an extra ground strap from the antenna base to the frame is said to help, but I didn't try that yet myself.
 

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F16Jock wrote:
Just accept the fact that the effective range of a motorcycle mounted CB radio is measured in yards, not miles.
F16Jock Welcome to this Great Site:waving:
 

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Ah the memories. My call sign was AK9664 (Auckland NZ)
 

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satan wrote:
On items mentioned above that will really knock-down range is the "skip" factor....
Propagation characteristics at 27 MHz are a factor, however I'm inclined to think that what really knocks down range is trying to fit an 8.5 foot long radio wave into a 30 inch antenna dressed up with a loadingcoil to look like it's 8.5 feetto the transmitter. Then add to the combinationthe woefully inadequate ground plain presented by a motorcycle frame and the whole mess located pretty close tomotherearth, you really can't expect much. Topped off with less than 5 watts of RF (if you keep it legal) and AM modulation, it's a combination that simply can't work very well because of those pesky laws of physics. If you think noise is bad now on CB radio wait until Broadband over Power Line gets in full swing.

I’m really surprised that FRS hasn’t caught on as a motorcycle communications method other than the little helmet mounted gizmos.
 

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:waving: The Honda CB on a motorcycle if you get a range of 1.5 miles , consider it excellent. That is it. No more. That is all you get.

You can receive stronger signals and hear sometimes, but you cannot transmit or receive from other bikes very far.

The CB is simply a tool for group rides, that is all it is good for. It has no range an no amount of tuning or tweaking will extend it range.

Kit
 

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as for the channels it is usually up to the group of riders in what channel they want to talk on.we may use channel 2 today and use channel 5 tommarow.We try and find one not to busy so it is just us talkin to each other.
 
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