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glhonda wrote that a relay can be put inline at the regulator to stop overcharging. What kind of relay would this be and where can you get this from.. Thanks
 

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Its not a faulty reg. brand new still 15+ charging.. Earlier topic replied that a relay can be installed on the black wire off the reg that would help this but didn't say what kind or where you can get this
 

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Jimijet wrote:
Earlier topic replied...

You got a link to that topic? ...
 

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There are a lot of threads about voltmeters that read incorrectly or batteries that are being overcharged by the regulator. There is a common denominator and a fix.

The voltmeter isn't connected to the battery, it's connected to the electrical system. System and battery values are different due to connections and line loss. The older the bike, the more prone it is to have a wider variance between system and battery. Some as much as 1.5 volts. It's okay if you're smart enough to add 1.5 volts to the voltmeter reading, but there is downside. It causes the regulator to overcharge the battery.

The regulator sees the same voltage as the meter. 1.5 volts less than actual battery voltage. So it kicks the voltage from a nominal 14.x to 15 volts or better. And that's too high. Most charging systems are regulated to 14.2-14.4.

Here's the fix.

Break the ignition wire to the regulator, use it to close a relay that provides power from the battery to the regulator. Now the regulator sees actual battery voltage and regulates correctly. The nice thing is, you've also provided a tap so the voltmeter reads the actual battery voltage as well.

 

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The black wire with the white strip is the voltage regulator feedback wire. If it doesn't have enough voltage going to it the voltage regulator tries to keep up. Like wingsalor said, you want to take a relay and run a wire from the battery to the relay then from the relay to the black/white wire. You want to energize the relay with a switched voltage like the accessory connection on the fuse block. That way when the key is on the voltage regulator will be getting the feedback voltage feed to it directly from the battery. If the battery is good and you have good charging voltage you should see around 14.5 volts at 2500 rpm or more. Idle voltage should be down around 13.5. What does your battery show for voltage with the bike shut off?
 

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this is all that I received:?Posted: Mon Sep 19th, 2011 08:05 am 2[sup]nd[/sup] Post Add as FriendIgnore Member PMQuoteReply jwhitmore44 Senior Member


Joined:Wed Apr 12th, 2006 Location:St. Francis, Kansas USA Posts:2352 Goldwing:GL1200 Aspencade Mileage:84000 ... Status: [align=center]
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3[sup]rd[/sup] Post Add as FriendIgnore Member PMQuoteReply Wingsailor Active Member


Joined:Mon Apr 24th, 2006 Location:Manson, North Carolina USA Posts:172 Goldwing:GL1200 Aspencade, GL1800 Mileage:
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+1 for what "jw" said. I found that the ignition switch was causing a less than accurate battery voltage to the "regulator". Installed a relay controlled by the black and white wire from the ign. switch to run battery voltage straight to the regulator.

____________________
1984 GL1200A
2005 GL1800
1983 Tanzer 22
 

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Joined:Wed Apr 12th, 2006 Location:St. Francis, Kansas USA Posts:2352 Goldwing:GL1200 Aspencade Mileage:84000 ... Status: Offline Mana:
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Are you checking with a handheld meter or do you have a meter installed o the bike? Assuming the meter is working correctly and since you tried another voltage regulator, the only thing I can think of would be the feedback voltage to your regulator. I believe it's the black wire with the white stripe that is used to tell the voltage reg what voltage the battery is at. This wire usually is feed through the fuse box instead fo being wired to the battery. A low reading on this wire can cause the regulator t run at a higher level.
 

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...there's nothing automatic about that circuit mod though. It's just reading battery voltage directly because the regs input is now directly connected to the battery, not seeing thevoltage dropthrough the rest of the electrical system but at the battery voltage itself. You'd still have to have a switch on that relay (assuming a over-charge condition happens) to disconnect.

Add this circuit for automatic operation. There's enough voltage control in that circuit to additionally trigger a relay.
 

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just when I thought I was ready to fix this another wrench in the spokes. Hey captain, who sells this type of auto relay?
 

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Jimijet wrote:
There are a lot of threads about voltmeters that read incorrectly or batteries that are being overcharged by the regulator. There is a common denominator and a fix.

The voltmeter isn't connected to the battery, it's connected to the electrical system. System and battery values are different due to connections and line loss. The older the bike, the more prone it is to have a wider variance between system and battery. Some as much as 1.5 volts. It's okay if you're smart enough to add 1.5 volts to the voltmeter reading, but there is downside. It causes the regulator to overcharge the battery.

The regulator sees the same voltage as the meter. 1.5 volts less than actual battery voltage. So it kicks the voltage from a nominal 14.x to 15 volts or better. And that's too high. Most charging systems are regulated to 14.2-14.4.

Here's the fix.

Break the ignition wire to the regulator, use it to close a relay that provides power from the battery to the regulator. Now the regulator sees actual battery voltage and regulates correctly. The nice thing is, you've also provided a tap so the voltmeter reads the actual battery voltage as well.

This diagram is all you need to make it work. Get a 20 amp 4 pin relay from a parts store, normally used to operate things like fog lights or other high amp accessories.
 

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dave0430, dave if the rectifier was getting hot can it cause it to over charge? regards walkabout :)
 

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Before you start rewiring check the voltage of the black wire at the regulator with the bike running. If it's the same or very close to battery voltage your regulator is fubared.
 

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walkabout wrote:
dave0430, dave if the rectifier was getting hot can it cause it to over charge? regards walkabout :)
The regulator getting hot is normal. The only way to cool it down is to use more of the available wattage.
 
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