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Chevron DELO is found at Walmart for 10 dollars a gallon! Those stores seem to be everywhere~

Has anyone on Delo done the Blackstone analysis just to see what the numbers are?

I think 2500 miles is way too soon for an oil change, unless you are riding thru Death Valley all the time!


What does a oil analysis cost ? And where do you get one ?

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What does a oil analysis cost ? And where do you get one ?.
This is who I've always used - http://www.oaitesting.com/

$20 dollars thereabouts, depending on how you go about it. I spend $22 each time because of how I package and ship.
They'll kepp a log of each, send you the same for your own independent records and interpretation, and give you their meaning of the results from their relevant database history.

One example of a good use is: Do I have coolant contamination in my oil, and how much?
The reasoning's are endless in my opinion. Especially on a new engine.
Another example would be for a "health" report on a used engine...

The more samples logged for a engine, the better understanding of the engines health and longevity.

A sampling of your next three oil changes will give a EXACT picture of your engines health.

This how I approach it:
First sampling is a baseline.
Second is comparative.
Third is confirmation.
Subsequent sampling observes wear.

...best insurance around in my opinion.
 

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This is who I've always used - http://www.oaitesting.com/

$20 dollars thereabouts, depending on how you go about it. I spend $22 each time because of how I package and ship.

Thanks for the information, that company has a lab in Canada and will do the test.

I won't be getting the test done, $62.00 CAD.


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There should be something in your region more cost effective I would think.
Find a trucking, cab or bus company and see if they use anyone local to you if interested in doing it.
Maybe a search in the phonebook for gas chromatography labs can yield something?
Your local hospital might even be able to point you somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
One thing the article I posted mentioned is that the Delo 400 LE and Rotella-T on shelves today is not the same formulation as what it was pre-2007 which had notably better specs.
You can still get the older Delo, I believe it is called Delo 400 Multigrade 15w40, from distributors or special order. That or Valvoline Premium Blue (if cheap enough) would be my go to in lieu of synthetic.

I am not an expert on oil, so the layman's explanation is that they needed to remove things from the oil that could potentially contaminate the DPF in diesel vehicles. They added other things to the oil to make up the difference that are not as robust, and overall reduced the Total Base Number of the oil, which relates to how much it can neutralize acid build up that occurs as the oil is used.

However, this is when comparing the oils to other DIESEL rated oils. Compared to Car oils or non-performance gasoline engine oils these are still on the high end with their additive packs.
As one of the other members pointed out Goldwings are not diesel, so I would surmise that these two oils are still just fine for this use.
Further, as long as you are changing the oil regularly, the point is further mooted.
As long as you have had good service with the oil you are using there is no point to change unless you want something better or have another parameter you wish to achieve, like cold weather starting or cleaning out your engine.


As far as oil analysis for motorcycles it is not worth it in my case because I don't put on enough miles in a year to meet the oil change interval anyway so I just do the annual change. I also have a stove that can burn waste oil, so old oil won't go to waste.
 

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Old oil kills the grass under my fence :)
I've a neighbor that has an elaborate filtering set-up for used oil in his garage.
He uses it in his ex-Army Chevy 1-ton.
Same fella I bought that Big-Mow lawn mower from that ran it on E-85 for over a decade.

I'm always on the lookout for a decent old VW Rabbit diesel truck to do the same with.

I can get unlimited used oil and bulk store it. He'll let me copy his set-up and processes.
I should've kept my Scout. It had a Mercedes diesel in it...
 

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www.blackstone-labs.com for analysis - see site for details but its wealth of info and sample is compared to every sample of same type they have ever done, then a human writes an interpretation of all the data for you.
My car club is big on these test,, to run long interval oil change ~15kmiles
$28 USD for a standard analysis- thats all we need.

From their site:
Oil analysis is a quick, nondestructive way to gauge the health of an engine by looking at what's in the oil.

What does a standard analysis include?
In our standard oil analysis, we perform four tests:

Spectral exam:
In the spectral exam, we take a portion of your oil sample and run it through a machine called a spectrometer. The spectrometer analyzes the oil and tells us the levels of the various metals and additives that are present in the oil. This gives us a gauge of how much your engine is wearing. To learn more about the elements we look at and where they come from in your oil, go to our Report Explanation page.

Insolubles test:
The insolubles test measures the amount of abrasive solids that are present in the oil. The solids are formed by oil oxidation (when the oil breaks down due to the presence of oxygen, accelerated by heat) and blow-by past the rings. This test tells you how good a job the oil filter is doing, and to what extent the oil has oxidized.

Viscosity test:
The viscosity measures the grade, or thickness, of the oil. Whether it's supposed to be a 5W/30, 15W/40, or some other grade, we will know (within a range) what the viscosity should be. If your viscosity falls outside that range, there's probably a reason: the oil could have been overheated or contaminated with fuel, moisture, or coolant.

Flash Point test:
The Flash Point test measures the temperature at which vapors from the oil ignite. For any specific grade of oil, we know what temperature the oil should flash at. If it flashes at or above that level, the oil is not contaminated. If the oil flashes off lower than it should, then it's probably been contaminated with something. Fuel is the most common contaminant in oil.

We can perform our standard oil analysis on any sample of oil, whether it's engine oil, transmission oil, an oil-based additive, power steering fluid, lube oil, hydraulic oil, biodiesel, or another type of oil.

There are more specialized tests we can perform on an oil sample, depending on your needs. For a complete list of the tests we do and their cost, go to our Tests page.

In My Opinion having it done once will tell you if anything funny is happening now with metal wear from various parts...knowledge is power, and safety!!
 

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Discussion Starter #29
This is the cheapest I am aware of
You prepay for a set of kits.
http://www.polarislabs.biz/default.aspx
Works out around $150 + postage to ship for 10 test kits.
Make sure the engine is hot when getting the sample

Here Bill Hewitt shows the product and gives an overview of the test
 

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I'm really liking this thread now.
I've brought this up before and felt like such an oddball for doing it here.

We get sick, we go to the Doctor. He samples our fluids for testing. He brings us back to do it again for conformation.
Our bikes are the same. At least mine are.
Inexpensive insurance to costly machines.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Wait until I start a thread about fuel and oil additives: the preventative medicine :) I will say no more about it here.

Often I use other people's data and extrapolate it to my own situation if it measures up.
On my Harley, I would have no problems taking my oil out to 5k, though I have not done a UOA (used oil analysis) and it is an air cooled/common sump. Many people on other forums have good data, and since I am running Synth I am even less concerned.

I have also heard of Goldwings out to 12k+ mile intervals (for those fortunate enough to ride that much).

So if anyone does get their oil analyzed it helps out the community as a whole, as long as they provide appropriate background on the circumstances of the bike being tested.
 

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I have also heard of Goldwings out to 12k+ mile intervals (for those fortunate enough to ride that much).

So if anyone does get their oil analyzed it helps out the community as a whole, as long as they provide appropriate background on the circumstances of the bike being tested.
That is why I included the two links up early about the guy who did the oil analysis religiously.... I doubt we ever have anyone do that again.
 

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I don't see a good enough reason in most cases to have an oil analysis done, after all the vast majority of engines run their whole lives without ever having it done and most of them go a long time without a problem. If there was reason to suspect something wrong it might help diagnose the problem but even then an experienced mechanic would probably already have a pretty good idea of the problem and a tear down would be in order anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
I think it is more inline with commercial applications or for diesels.
Both use tremendous volume of oil.

In both you can potentially save money by extending the interval required for changes.
My 7.3l used 16qts per change + filter = $60-$90 per change depending on oil. So the difference between a 5k vs 7.5k vs 10k vs 15k oil change is a lot of cost savings for the individual, and even more for the fleet.

In commercial engine applications you also have prediction of engine failure or additional wear so that you can schedule repairs ahead of time and compensate for the down time.

To me it is mostly curiosity.
 

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So it seems that no users of diesel oil in the Wing have actually had analysis done,
meaning they are going on color of oil to indicate its condition...thats not a great method~
 

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So it seems that no users of diesel oil in the Wing have actually had analysis done,
meaning they are going on color of oil to indicate its condition...thats not a great method~

Tom,
you are putting too much 'over think' into this.

Oil analysis is just simply not necessary for the Goldwing engines.
Being water cooled, and turning relatively slow RPMs, they have historically run multi-hundred-thousands of miles and never once had an oil analysis done.

And, any one who choose to use a diesel spec oil, has at least twice the protection of an oil designed for other use.

On my 1500s, I settled in on Chevron's Delo 400 10w40 and never once had a moment's worry about is the "oil okay?" I ran them to about 5,000 miles and changed them.

when I lived in Arizona, the '94SE was my sole transportation and it was changed on miles.... the '98SE was acquired after my accident with the 18 wheeler and did not see the same type use, so it got changed annually.
 

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This is fun to watch unfold.

That said, I change oil around 3,000 miles, (if not sooner for the bikes that do trackdays). I could probably run vegetable oil, and have no ill-effects.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
When it comes to diesel engine oils, most of it could be summed up as overall they are more robust than your average gasser oil.

At one point in time, certain additives in diesel engine oils could potentially have had negative ("poisoning" I believe is the correct term) effects on catalytic converters in some gasoline vehicles. For that reason those oils may not have been recommended, but not for quality of the oil itself.

From what I have seen today, most diesel oils have also gotten spec approval for gasoline engines, which means this is no longer the case.

I don't think it was a very big deal to begin with, and certainly not so much on motorcycles.

So use whatever quality of oil you like as long as it meets or exceeds spec.
Which apparently Honda is pretty vague about. Harley is more specific, but they include diesel rated oil.
 

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When I was doing diesel repairs for a Commercial laundry in Michigan, I had to do the tests religiously,due to some of their driver's habits....like cruising around with the OD locked in,in heavy traffic,or trying to scream down the highway,to their next drop.
Or,my least favorite,not letting the engines warm,before driving off.
They had 7.3 litre engines,and except for one, the analysis saved on replacement costs.
It also convinced the boss,that he had some abusive drivers.
If I suspect a problem,but it's not evident,yes I will,and have had it done.
It's how I found the water glass that the vandal put in my engine !
I just wish I had done the Bolens too.
 
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