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for anyone that lives in an area that has Fleet Farm stores they have the exact same Eureka tent on sale this week for $49, i bought a new tent a couple of years ago otherwise i would be buying one of these
 

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For the occasional user I suppose it would do, but don't expect to keep very dry in it if it rains very hard. There isn't much of awaterproof coating on both the fly and the floor. (only 800mm, where the 'industry standard' is usually in the 1500 - 1800mm range, or higher)

Marginally better than a Walmart 'special' I suppose. :baffling:
 

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Dusty Boots wrote:
For the occasional user I suppose it would do, but don't expect to keep very dry in it if it rains very hard. There isn't much of a waterproof coating on both the fly and the floor. (only 800mm, where the 'industry standard' is usually in the 1500 - 1800mm range, or higher)

Marginally better than a Walmart 'special' I suppose.   :baffling:
Usually I never go against the "meister," Dusty Boots, but I have to speak up today in defense of our Eureka 4-person Timberline tent, in which we've spent days and days and nights and nights -- and quite a few rainy days and nights -- and have never been "wet upon!" I'd buy another in a heartbeat; never spent a better $140.
 

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CJ,

I think what Dusty is saying is that this is the bottom end offering from a quality tent maker. You and I both know that the Timberline series is an outstanding tent... proven and venerated by decades of service.

I have to say... I am still very partial to my North Face Arrowhead... shown HERE without the fly orHERE with the fly. But increasingly, I like the idea of being able to stand up inside the tent at least well enough to get my leg into my pants. I cannot manage that in this tent...

I was just suggesting that for those that might be looking for a light tent, that was about the right size for MC tripping at reasonable price... this one looked like it fits the bill pretty well.
 

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You're right, T. It is towards the bottom of this tent makers product line

Like I said, alright for the occasional user, especially in a drier climate.

My fav tent for touring, while somewhat more expensive, ($249) has waterproofing of 2,000mm on the fly and 10,000 on the floor and is tall enough(55") to partially stand up in to change, has two doors and two, large covered vestibules with a full coverage fly. Much more usable floor/headroom that an A frame design.

Besides, I'd never consider a tent with fibreglass poles. :ShakeHead: (too fragile/brittle)



BTW CJ, you'd be very hard pressed to get your tent(without your optional vestibule) for under $ 170 now a days. :smiler:

How's yournew pop-uptrailer working out? I havent heard how you like it since you've bought it! :baffling:Just curious. I think it was an Aspen Sentry, wasn't it??I'm keeping my eye open for a good used one as well :ssshh:

If you are going to be using a tent fairly extensivelyduring your bike travels (or even car camping) it's better to get a better quality tent that will last/stand up much better/longer, than a cheapie that will leak/rip etcand make you miserable. Nothing worse than that IMHO!
 

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What I notice about that picture of that tent is there are about 20 points at which you need to connect the tent to the poles. I can't tell if they are loops you have to slide the poles through or are hooks you need to connect to the poles. For me ease of setup is an important item. If it takes too much messing around to set up or pack when ready to go it will cut into your enjoyment.

Also, for me, when I get up in the morning I am a bit stiff in the joints and need to be able to move around and stand up so I can get moving to get dressed. That tent doesn't look to have room for that.

I'm not saying this looks like a bad tent, I am saying it would be unsuitable for me. It doesn't matter how inexpensive something is, if it is not suited to your needs it is an aggravation and/or a waste to buy it. This tent is probably Ideal for some people here, I just think it is a good idea to compare your needs to the features available before making a choice.
 

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Dusty Boots wrote:
You're right, T. It is towards the bottom of this tent makers product line

Like I said, alright for the occasional user, especially in a drier climate.

My fav tent for touring, while somewhat more expensive, ($249) has waterproofing of 2,000mm on the fly and 10,000 on the floor and is tall enough(55") to partially stand up in to change, has two doors and two, large covered vestibules with a full coverage fly. Much more usable floor/headroom that an A frame design.

Besides, I'd never consider a tent with fibreglass poles.  :ShakeHead: (too fragile/brittle)

 

BTW CJ, you'd be very hard pressed to get your tent(without your optional vestibule) for under $ 170 now a days. :smiler:

How's your new pop-up trailer working out? I havent heard how you like it since you've bought it!   :baffling: Just curious. I think it was an Aspen Sentry, wasn't it??   I'm keeping my eye open for a good used one as well  :ssshh:

If you are going to be using a tent fairly extensively during your bike travels (or even car camping) it's better to get a better quality tent that will last/stand up much better/longer, than a cheapie that will leak/rip etc and make you miserable. Nothing worse than that IMHO!
We like it, Dusty, like it a lot, but I've only towed it for about 150 miles total, and we were only able to put up one weekend in it.... But I think it's gonna be the bees knees, especially as time marches up on me. Although this coming summer we're really trying to get over again to Europe, and there it will be a tent, hostels, and third rate hotels! Lol...
 

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us385south wrote:
I have never used or seen this tent, but I am a big fan of Eureka tents and this one is about the right size and I would suspect is well built.

Oh... and an excellent price too...

http://www.campmor.com/eureka-tetragon-7-three-person-tent.shtml?cm_cat=TRAILMAIL&cm_ite=TrailMail-November302011&cm_pla=46746&cm_ven=EMAIL
Amazon has the same tent for $38.97

http://slickdeals.net/permadeal/52881/amazon.com-additional-20-off-select-eureka-tetragon-tents-tetragon-5-adventure-7x-5-twoperson-tent



As has been pointed out if you intend to camp while traveling and stay dry or have the tent remain standing in a storm, buy quality. There is nothing, absolutely nothing that will ruin a vacation more than being miserable from nights spent in a tent in wet bedding.
 

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DougW wrote:
What I notice about that picture of that tent is there are about 20 points at which you need to connect the tent to the poles. I can't tell if they are loops you have to slide the poles through or are hooks you need to connect to the poles. For me ease of setup is an important item. If it takes too much messing around to set up or pack when ready to go it will cut into your enjoyment.

Also, for me, when I get up in the morning I am a bit stiff in the joints and need to be able to move around and stand up so I can get moving to get dressed. That tent doesn't look to have room for that.

I'm not saying this looks like a bad tent, I am saying it would be unsuitable for me. It doesn't matter how inexpensive something is, if it is not suited to your needs it is an aggravation and/or a waste to buy it. This tent is probably Ideal for some people here, I just think it is a good idea to compare your needs to the features available before making a choice.
Doug... if you are talking about my tent bear in mind that 30 years ago things were different. If you are talking about that Eureka Teragon I can assure you those are clips. I concur with Dusty about the fiberglass poles, they are typically very heavy and subject to breaking in high winds.

I would point out that at the time of it's purchase that North Face tent I had was second only to the NF VE-25 as the best tent of that era. These were mountain rated... high wind... summit assault tents. (I'm talking Everest or K-2 here!) Also note that the crisscrossing "geodesic" pattern of the poles is what continues to give this tent superior rating in high wind environments. A bit heavy by today's standards but absolutely bullet proof.

Dusty... that MEC tent looks like a winner... I would point out that the extended ridge pole for the fly is VERY similar to the Eureka Timberline.
 

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us385south wrote:
Dusty... that MEC tent looks like a winner... I would point out that the extended ridge pole for the fly is VERY similar to the Eureka Timberline.
Actually T, they are nothing alike at all.

The Wanderer series (I have both the 2 and 4 person variety) uses a 'Central Hub' system, that all the shock corded aluminum poles attach to with the allshock cords passing through the 'Hub'.

Here's a better shot of it;







Neither of them are suitable for backpacking (too heavy), but they do make excellent canoe tripping/MotoCamping/car campingabodes.



For backpacking, I useone of Henry's Double Rainbow TarpTentsAll 43 ozs of it. :smiler:





It packs down very small! ..... but lacks the overallroom for getting changed/removing/storing my riding gear, like either of my Wanderer series tents provide.
 

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While they are a nice, typical European designed tunnel tent, with good attributes and materials, they are relatively short in stature (in comparisson to their sprawling length), not allowing you to stand/stoop toget in your pants/riding gear very easily.

Besides the lack of height, their biggest drawback is their length, which is due mostly to their large, hoopedvestibule. Good luck in trying to find a spot to set them up in at most parks, as the tent pads most parks now require you to set your tent up on avaerage 10' x 10' with some 12' x 10'.

Even your 2 man tent, with a length of over 13.45' (and a height of just 45") will be too long for these pads, unless you collapse the vestibule. Nice tents, though!!
 

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Dusty Boots wrote:
While they are a nice, typical European designed tunnel tent, with good attributes and materials, they are relatively short in stature (in comparisson to their sprawling length), not allowing you to stand/stoop toget in your pants/riding gear very easily.

Besides the lack of height, their biggest drawback is their length, which is due mostly to their large, hoopedvestibule. Good luck in trying to find a spot to set them up in at most parks, as the tent pads most parks now require you to set your tent up on avaerage 10' x 10' with some 12' x 10'.

Even your 2 man tent, with a length of over 13.45' (and a height of just 45") will be too long for these pads, unless you collapse the vestibule. Nice tents, though!!
I've never seen the limit of 10'x12' or 10'x10', but then again I have not camped a lot in the US, and is learning what I can from you and other mebers here. The larger tent is a "want" due to the huge difference I see in quality and compactability from tents sold in the local gear stores hereand the ones sold in Europe. The bigger tent I mentioned is actually 15' long and 9' wide and the inside height is 5'11". It packs up to 9,4" by 20,8" with a weight of 15,6 lbs, and will fit easily in the top box. The cost of this tent is $1000,- and the cost of the tent I have now is $1250,-. It would be nice to add another biggertent but this is the best I have seen so far. What would you choose for a larger tent ? I ride two up, no trailer and I can't stand low quality stuff.



I am listening...
 

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Dusty knows his tents. Mrs. Rudy says his is the best.
Give it up Mel.
 

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Tents are such a personal thing and what works for me, may not work for your application and vice versa. Do you want a large 'garage' type vestibule, no vestibule, 2 person, 4 person, 6 person (or larger),single wall, double wall, lots of height, tunnel, dome, A-frame , cabin ???? There are a ton of tents out there in the North American market, never mind other countries

You will probably be able to work with your smaller tent, having the vestibule run off and over the edge of the pad. You may get lucky enough to even work your large tent in at the odd campsite, using the above method of pitching.You may find the park you choose doesn't have these pads. It's a crap shoot. Never know what you'll run into, until you get there.

While not all parks have pads, a lot of them do and their rules state that all tents must be on/within these 'pads'. Not bad for just me and my tent, but if you have a large tent, or more than 1 tent at the site .....

Nobody said anything to us at Glacier when we had to pitch one of ourthree 2 person tents off of the pad, but it was early in the season, so I don't think they were really enforcing it at that point.





At Snow Canyon State Park, the rangers were kind enough to direct Dave and I to their campsite (#23) with their largest pad, so we could pitch both of our tents on it. Mine is the 2 person Wanderer, while Dave's is the Eureka 4 man Timberline. While we had enough room for them, there wasn't a whole lot of extra space.





A lot of the campsites are fairly small and a large, expansive tent would be a problem to find enough room to pitch,



.....like this campsite in OR. Just enough room for my 2 person tent.



While not all parks are instituting the 'pad policy' more and more are. US National Parks are notorious for their small campsites Most National Forest campgrounds are not 'padded' yet and most of them have a fairly decent sized campsite (but not all!), provided you can find a spot suitable enough for pitching. (rocks/roots/holes etc)



I like the Wanderer series of tents from MEC, as they suit my needs well. I did a review earlieron the Wanderer 2 here - (The Wanderer 4 is just a larger version of the 2and has one detachable vestibule, which is now standard equipment, but it looks like MEC is going to redesign them after all these years, as they no longer have the Wanderer 2 listed and the 4 is listed as a clearance item at the moment) -

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/forum9/70637.html
 

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I have to agree that both those European tents seem huge to me. Especially the vestibules. (what are you storing in there?) I also agree that their height seems limited... I am too old to be rolling around on the floor while getting my pants on and most camp grounds are more

However... I have to stand with CJ in defense of the Eureka Timberline. It has the height I need to get a leg into my overalls... it has a small but usable vestibule... it's affordable... it has lots of accessories that are readily available all over North America... and it has a limited foot print, even in the four person version.

T
 

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The Eureka Timberline 4 is the "Great Compromiser" for us, but it does all those things we really need! It's big enough to stand in (sorta) to get your pants on, and to store all of your equipment out of the weather, but not too big to pack; it's cheap, I still see them on Campmor for $170, but it's not cheaply made -- we've been in torrential downpours and strong winds, and it's never given us cause for concern; you can buy extra poles and equipment for it, flies and vestibules even, almost anywhere; and we've never found a pad yet that it couldn't be shoehorned onto.... Finally, the A-Frame design is time honored, and strong, and doesn't deform down onto your face in strong winds like some dome-ers do. I've seen the Timberlines rated in some catalogues at 3.5 season tents. I've been up at Camp Muir on Mt. Rainier many times in a Timberline 2, once during a heavy, heavy snow fall. Every once in awhile one of us would reach up and slam the tent wall, causing accumulated snow to slide off harmlessly. It's enough tent for 95% of all conditions..... And, as you can tell, I love the thing; I have a strong emotional attachment to my tent!




In fact, I love our old T-line so much, I almost feel like a traitor going to the Aspen Sentry! (I never claimed to be logical, guys!) And the old Timberline will always have an honored nail of it's own from which to dangle in our new garage. Also, if we do get over to Europe this summer? Guess what will be coming along with us?

:ROFL::ROFL::ROFL::ROFL::ROFL::ROFL::ROFL::ROFL:
 

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