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I just bought one of Harbor Freight motorcycle lifts , I am going to build a better clamp to hold the front tire. I have never used a lift before and would be glad for any advice or tips. I plan to buy an air over hydraulic jack to replace the manual pump. Thank You
 

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I've got one and love it. One person on here built wooden boxes to put on either side so you have a place to put your feet while loading bike. No problems with mine my legs are long enough to reach floor. Mine tilts a little right when lifting but never been an issue. Would be interested in knowing how much your conversion costs. Pics also. Everyone likes to see pictures.
 

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drive the bike up and put on center stand.. most people ive seen use them dont bother with tie down. But I always tie down just to be safe even on the jack. dont want a 1000 pound bike falling on me. I know of a horror story about bike falling on a kid and it killed him... sad..
 

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Picture for the rest of us would be nice.

I've used sizzor lift before but on on a bike of this weight.
 

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I built this for mine. It allows you to run the bike past the platform and then when you put it on the center stand it has the rear tire over the deck hole. It also gets the center stand off of the removable plate. I also moved the vise forward to corellate with the move forward.

I originally had it permanently bolted on but now it tips off and hooks on. I tripped over it and cut my leg so then modified it to be removable.
 

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Hey Lane...



I don't "ride on" at all preferring to walk the bike up from the side, but that'll take a better wheel clamp than the HF table comes with: (12" x 3" 13-gauge) -- Stole the idea to "borrow" the acme screw from a trailer tongue jack.The stop plate is just a bit of 0.25 scrap (an airbag mount, actually, with a little bend in it)...



Wish that I had cut the other end off the crank handle (you don't need the crank length, but having it kinda "fold" when you whack your knee/arm against it would be really NICE (lesson learned & shared) -- shortening the crank-arm will help you 'spin' it tight more quickly and you totally do NOT wanna have the clamping force that the long crank would get you - no need. The stop plate is just a bit of 0.25 scrap (an airbag mount, actually, with a little bend in it)... the neighbor's kid thinks it looks like a metal ninja or one of the ghosts from PacMan



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Also ths shows a 6" table extension (like 11-gauge?) with some 1/2" x 1" tubing underneath scabbed into the table's existing structure. the extension really doesn't see weight ; tire contact is about where the center mounting bolt is located...Of course the extension in broke 90* for additional stiffness and to match the table (about, 1/2" IIRC) -- the 6" extension sets the 1500's rear wheel just forward of the center of the dropout (below) to allow for easy tire-dropping...



From other posts, I seem to remember there needing to be a 12" or 14" allowance at the front of the table to address centerstand use.





I will not use a center stand on these HF tables (OPINION) - decking is thin for concetrated weight, the center stand gets in the way of other operations, and the wobel has been mentioned (of course, you will strap the bike down for working or lifting, but strapping down would add to the point-pressures on the center stand) ... Also, I just never did use a centerstand on a table... so I'm not used to it. If you plan to run the centerstand then you will need more extension length to accomodate the back-travel from the stand and a standard wheel vise will need to address the same over travel or be of little/no use to you.



I prefer a table-jack (service jack) for the versatility and selection of lift point (not to mention stability and distributon of load into/onto the table) kinda like this...



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FWIW: The deck is painted with a slip-stop additivein aRustoleum-type paint. For me, the deck was not only slippery, but RED is a horrible color to work with. Maybe just my eyes, but tough to see dropped stuff and it kinda 'sucks-up' light -- lighter gray feels kinder to my eyes and not so dark.. Slippery is good for cleaning, but crappy for other stuff... since the deck is already diamond plate - squeegee-cleaning was already "off-the-list" 7 thickness of teh paint job over the traction stuff still allows for shop-rag cleanups.





... just some thoughts ...
 

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I bought one a while ago from HF, the 1000lbs capacity lift.
The supplied wheel vise was not to my liking, so I bought a K&L Wheel Vise and also a K&L Fat Jack.

The only other change is that I added some short pieces of 4x4 under the front of the deck where the front wheel normally is.(used as legs)
With the lift all the way down, if you happen to step on the front of the lift (without a bike on it) the lift would tip forward. The legs just support the deck when the lift is down.

Not sure how to post multiple pics on one post, so I'll post twice I guess...

First the wheel vise...
Look closely as it is adjustable from front to back, makes it ideal for different bikes...
 

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I have a jack similar to the one you mentioned. I usually slide the jack from theright side and go up slow checking for center and balance. if I'm pulling the front wheel i block the back so it won't drop and I always stabalize side to side.
I had one fall when changing the front fork seals on a 78Gl 1000 one time talk about a pain to pick up. Always be careful. I have a wood floor in my shop so I nail blocks to tie of to.
 

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Dutchman, Do you use a battery drill with a socket to raise that jack. Or does it take more torque than that. That is a sweet looking jack.
 

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FeButter wrote:
Dutchman,  Do you use a battery drill with a socket to raise that jack.  Or does it take more torque than that.  That is a sweet looking jack.
I use a Cresent Wrench to raise and lower the bike(s) on the jack. The GL1500 is quite heavy so a drill won't quite do...
 

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Thank You all very much for the great ideas ,I have three sons and they all have motorcycles and they will be using the lift to maintain them ,that's why i want to make it as safe as i can. the main thing i am going to start with is the front wheel clamp .I will post some pics when i have it done and the slip proof paint sounds like a good fix also .

Thanks again
 
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