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I know, just another alt connector story - this time a po had replaced it with another stock conn. and spliced it in with butt conn....badly.
I've used butts, but soldered them in and covered with heatshrink (esp when exposed to weather).
So for now I've got #14 jumper wirenuted in, but plan on changing to high flex wire with Sermos or Deans conn.

Now I'm showing a charge of 14.9V to 15.15V pretty much from idle to 3K rpm.
 

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Good quality connectors done with the right tool can work OK but sometimes people buy the cheap ones and crimp them with a pair of pliers and wonder why things don't work right. A bit of solder usually helps.

On the downside of solder, it can be a problem as it creates a rigid point that can fail under vibration. Heat shrink can act as a strain relief at these points.

Wire nuts do a good job of connecting but I don't trust them under vibration. They also have a steel spring and don't like being wet.
 

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...If you use the proper type crimping tool (Molex dual stage) on stranded wire, you will have a gas tight, permanent connector that will resist breaking for many years.

The first stage crimps the conductors, the 2nd stage crimps down on the vinyl jacket of the wire creating a very solid, permanent fixture.

I have been using these for years on fire trucks, and nothing in the world vibrates as badly as a fire truck.
 

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AZgl1500 wrote:


I have been using these for years on fire trucks, and nothing in the world vibrates as badly as a fire truck.
I don't know about that, you never drove the 88 freight shaker I use to run.:cheeky1::cheeky1:
James
 

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I've soldered connections for years and never had one fail. From my washing machine to my motorcycle.... and they always work just fine.,
 

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I used to install car stereos to work my way through college. One thing I learned is to use butt connectors for speed. As has been stated, using the right too and doing it right makes all of the difference. I usually don't put wires into both ends of the connector. I strip the insulation, twist the wires together, and slide the connector on and crimp. That way you have a good wire to wire connection that will not fail. Of course, you have to use a larger connector. They also make end connectors for this type of splice, but they are expensive.

I do connect into both ends at times. The key is to make sure the wire is twisted tight before crimping. That makes it so the wire can't fray out and pull loose.

Here is another little tidbit:
If you are working on a stereo, you can solder a red wire to the positive on an AA 1.5v battery, and black wire on the negative. Fold the wires along the battery and tape down with duct tape. Strip the wire ends and solder. Now, you have made a speaker checker. When you connect this tool to a speaker you can hear the small noise it makes moving the cone. Positive to positive moves the cone towards the front of the speaker and positive to negative moves it back into the speaker. So, you can check which wire go to witch speaker, and you can ckeck polarity.
 

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Little tips just keep popping forth all the time. Thanks for the idea Marcus... :gunhead:
 
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