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Hell again fellow goldwingers seeking some advice on hea gasket intall and any tips for the procedure my main concern is making sure the valves dont interfeir with the piston im tackling this job in the morning so any help would be great.
 

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goodcharlotte21 wrote:
Hell again fellow goldwingers seeking some advice on hea gasket intall and any tips for the procedure my main concern is making sure the valves dont interfeir with the piston.
Correctly lining up the timing belt marks will be the key to that. There are serveral threads on setting the belt timing. You will find some in the Reference forum, and manyothers in the Technical forum if you use teh search box provided.
 

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There's a couple hood tutorials at ngw.com with lots of photos in their section of "shoptalk." Good info at Randakks. Most important is to get the revised Honda torque settings and to grease each headbolt before tightening. There are lots who recommend OEM head gaskets only. I did my 77 last summer and it was the biggest job I had done on my own on a motor. Read tons first, take your time, and check in here and it is doable. I think the recommendations are to run it to operating temp, and retorque the heads. A lot of people forget the small bolt at the bottom of the head under the oil gallery return and it's easy to break the two small bolts of the cooling tube elbow on the top of the head. Separating the head from the block is difficult but it's because the only spots you can get to tap on are at the top. After a few taps on the top, lift the head from the bottom or tap with a mallet with force to move the head up. A few cycles and they come off.
 

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Just follow the manual (you have one, do you?). A few tricks to make it easier. Do this BEFORE you start removing the timing belts for the job and keep it that way until the belts are on again.

- move the crankshaft approximately 90 degrees (1/4 of a turn) out of T1 position, this will take all the pistons in the position where they cannot interfere with the valves
- loosen all the valve clearance adjustment lock nuts and unscrew the adjustment screws all the way out (thus making as much clearance as possible), this will reduce the spring effect thus making the job easier and safer.

As for the valve interference concern, there is no difference between changing the timing belts and removing the heads. So just follow the timing belts installation procedure (you have a good tutorial in the FAQ section) and you'll be fine.

Anyway, read the factory service manual and do what they say. Pay attention on cleaning the matching surfaces, making sure the bolt holes and bolts themselves are clean, using Moly grease on the bolt threads and under their heads etc.
When you have the heads off it is recommended to get the valves apart and clean them and their seats and gently lap them and change the stem seals. Again follow the manual for these operations. Cleaning&polishing of the piston foreheads would be nice. Of course make sure to completely clean up the heads (there will be much carbon on the inside) and wash them with a hot water and detergent until shiny, especially if you were lapping the valves.
Yes, don't forget to change the oil orifice o-rings, there are two of them on each head.
Good luck!
 

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I would add this just as my own opinion, from my experience: if you are using OEM gaskets that forget this. But if youre using aftermarkets, then if it were me, I would put some liquid sealant on them (like Permatex "spray on copper sealant") to improve sealing of the coolant chambers. I say this because I used aftermarkets which seems to be too hard and I did not use any liquid sealant so it took them a lot of heating/cooling cycles and re torquing two times after installation to stop leaking. Just my own experience though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
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Thanks everyone for the advice im gonna have to start buying everyone donuts lol. One more thing I buy all my stuff from honda unfortunately they didnt not have honda oem gaskets for whatever reason but were able to sell me a versah gasket kit are these kits any good?
 

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goodcharlotte21 wrote:
Thanks everyone for the advice im gonna have to start buying everyone donuts lol. One more thing I buy all my stuff from honda unfortunately they didnt not have honda oem gaskets for whatever reason but were able to sell me a versah gasket kit are these kits any good
I found the Vesrah Gaskets from George fix to be the closest looking to OEM.
Worked great for me The Vesrah Hd Gaskets have what appears to be re-inforcement woven in, where as some of the aftermarkets like the ones I got from Houston, had no thread like re-enforcement at all, and failed in one day.
 

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I used the ones from GeorgeFix also. I have about 4k on them and they're good so far. I hammer mine up to 10k rpm fairly often.
 

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Im glad to hear the versah gaskets are good and holding up because I would hate to have to change them anytime soon.
 
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