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I am currently working on an '85GL1200 Limited. Without the headlihgt plugged in the onboard voltmeter reads 14 volts when the engine is around 3K rpm. With the headlight plugged in it reads 11.5-12 volts at 3k rpm. I pulled the headlamp bulb. It is a 55/60 w halogen. I'm guessing this drop involtage isn't normal and I either have too much of a load on the system or the charging system is weak for some reason.



Supposedly the stator was changed in this bike recently.
 

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LongRider,



There is a history of charging issues on many of theses bikes , not just your 85 or my 86 sei. These two bikes are generally twins and I will tell you my experience.



There are several plastic factory connectors on the left side inder the side cover that my mechanic either cut out and soldered direct or told me to, which I did. They get old, brittle, cause a heat issue, break down further and cause all kinds of gremlins in your charging numbers.



I bought my bike with 40,000 on it and it now sits with 102,000. I have had charging issues twice and both times it was the rectifier. They can go out slow over time and start reducing the volt number registered on the on-board meter (similar to the numbers you listed) or they can go out relatively quickly and just indicate the voltage left in your battery as it slowly drains to a level that won't support operation of the bike. The rectifier is not hard to find, under the fax gas tank and in the far upper left hand corner. But it is hard to manipulate the bolt to mount it properly.



By my experience your numbers sound low. The first rectifier I bought held my volts at about 13.5 near 3000 rpm with all the usual equipment running. I do not have a bunch of extra anything on the bike but the headlight was operating. The current rectifier hold the voltage at about 14.8 to 15.1 in that rpm range. I'm not sure if there is an exact number, but your sounds low.



Somebody once told me that when the stator goes, a wire breaks and the field is shorted and it goes completely and quickly.
 

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1985 GL1200 Limited Edition
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The first thing to check is the stator, 50-70vac per leg with no shorts or open windings. If that's good, check the stator connector AND the regulator connectors for evidence of burning. That might be the problem. If it turns out to be the regulator, Use an OEM (Honda) regulator. Do NOT use an aftermarket one as they don't last!!



If you need any help testing the stator, ask and I'll post the proccedure.



Good luck!!
 

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Get youself a test meter & a copy of the service manual. A picture is worth a thousand words.

The more you learn yourself the better off you'll be.
 

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Digital meter, downloaded honda manuals, stator and recitifer tested-no apparent problems.
 

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Would you post the procedure for checking the stator please. I'd like to see how you test the stator output. At this point I've only conducted the continuity test. Thanks,
 

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here you go



GL1200 Stator Testing

By Neil









Get a digital voltmeter that measures A/C and DC as well as resistance

Pull battery cover (left side) off and put bike on centre stand



Have battery load tested at battery shop if OK charge overnight measure DC volts straight across battery after charge should be about 13.5-13.9 VDC Reinstall battery.

On the left side of the battery you will see three yellow wires either going to a plug or wired straight thru by previous owner


Disconnect the plug OR cut the three yellow wires one at a time VERY important ONE at a time mark wiresA; B: C; You have to disconnect to get true readings. If left connected a lot of other problems could mislead you. Clean wires leading to stator by about ½ inch. You will be soldering later



Start The bike



This will not hurt the bike in anyway. It will run on the battery

Put meter on A/C scale across any combination A-B;B-C;A-C rev bike to 3000 RPM. You should see 45 to 60 volts A/Cacross any of above combination

If OK shut bike offmeasure on resistance scale (50K is good) from each of three wires to ground It should be infinite EG open must not have any shorts to ground

Measure from A-B; B:-C; A:-C; measurement should be in the vicinity of 1.2 ohms on any of the legs

If all measurements are ok (volts and resistance)your stator is good



Bad News Scenarios



1 A/C volts under 40 V A/C (with wires disconnected and at 3000 RPM)

2 Any leg A: B: or C: shorted to ground (Low or no resistance to ground)

3 Any combination A:-B: B:-C: A:-C: open (infinite resistance)



If stator is bad you may consider the alternator alternative See separate post on that subject

Or it entails pulling engine to replace stator



Ifyou havethe plug cut it out and solder each of the three yellow wires straight thru cover with heat shrink. Follow wiring all the way down to where it enters engine(under sleeve) just to make sure there are no other hidden splices (throw the plug at the neighbour’s cat or some thing it’s a piece of crap)



While you are in the area it is recommended that you change the fuseable link (30 amp main fuse) to a heavy-duty fuse holder with bayonet style fuses. These old fuses have a tendency to corrode and fail at the worst times leaving you with a dead bike



Start bike with meter still attached to battery voltage will go down while cranking over but should come back up to 13 VDC plus when you rev bike turn on Hi Beams volt should drop slightly but still be over 13 VDC if not e.g. 11 to 11.5 dc replace regulator 10 min job (lots on ebay)
 
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