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After two aftermarket fuel pumps, I just ordered an a Mother Honda pump. The first aftermarket lasted 3 years & started to act up 1 week before last years NASR. I bought a new one & took it with me. The first one quit going from the Motel back to the campground (NASR). I changed it in the campground. On the last ride of last year, the new started to act up like the bike was out of gas. I just happen to be riding by a buddy's house & I stopped there & bought a couple gal of gas. On the way home I filled it up for the Winter.

Yesterday, I took it out for the first ride of the year for about a 130 ride to Galena. On the way home it quit again 4 blocks from the house.

I'm done with it & hope the big bucks for the OEM pump is worth it.
 

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I'm done with it & hope the big bucks for the OEM pump is worth it.
They usually are. I don't know why the aftermarket can't make parts that last.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Are your vacuum lines to the petcock and gas cap okay?

i would think so. I replaced the petcock when I replaced the pump the first time & all the vacuum lines when I put a carb kit in a few years ago.
 

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There is a NAPA P72190 fuel pump that people have been using because it is a lot cheaper than a direct replacement. I know I've seen a few people on this forum use them and seem to have very good luck with them. The conversion looks simple.
 

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There is a NAPA P72190 fuel pump that people have been using because it is a lot cheaper than a direct replacement. I know I've seen a few people on this forum use them and seem to have very good luck with them. The conversion looks simple.

I did this on my 98SE and it is a very good alternative fuel pump.


easy to do, although I highly recommend using a 90 degree brass elbow near the pump's outlet to avoid the line getting crimped and burning up a brand new fuel pump..... and I know this because? :|
 

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Discussion Starter #7
There is a NAPA P72190 fuel pump that people have been using because it is a lot cheaper than a direct replacement. I know I've seen a few people on this forum use them and seem to have very good luck with them. The conversion looks simple.

4 years ago when the OEM pump quit, I bought a Carter pump. It took a little re-engineering to get it working. That pump lasted until a week before last years NASR. I got on line & found another Carter & paid for 2nd day delivery. Well FEDEX lost it, & Friday I went to NAPA & got their pump. That is the one I installed at NASR. It didn't last 1500 miles. Mike (Pwhoever) tried a NAPA pump & said it only lasted a month. As far as NAPA's pump, been there & done that. Aint doing it again. :lash:
 

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4 years ago when the OEM pump quit, I bought a Carter pump. It took a little re-engineering to get it working. That pump lasted until a week before last years NASR. I got on line & found another Carter & paid for 2nd day delivery. Well FEDEX lost it, & Friday I went to NAPA & got their pump. That is the one I installed at NASR. It didn't last 1500 miles. Mike (Pwhoever) tried a NAPA pump & said it only lasted a month. As far as NAPA's pump, been there & done that. Aint doing it again. :lash:

Now that you mention it, Carter does sound very familiar. Mind you, these are very low pressure pumps. As AZ said, make sure you use an elbow to prevent the fuel line from kinking. Also make sure the fuel line is rated for a submersible pump. The difference is that the submersible is rated for fuel both inside and out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I received the OEM pump yesterday,. Will install tomorrow.
 

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Now that you mention it, Carter does sound very familiar. Mind you, these are very low pressure pumps. As AZ said, make sure you use an elbow to prevent the fuel line from kinking. Also make sure the fuel line is rated for a submersible pump. The difference is that the submersible is rated for fuel both inside and out.



the pump failures with this mod can be traced to the line kinking.


I burned up 2 pumps before I glommed onto what was happening.....
both were warrantied.


a brass tee stopped that problem, and it never reoccurred.


a plastic tee should work as well, and would be cheaper.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
the pump failures with this mod can be traced to the line kinking.


I burned up 2 pumps before I glommed onto what was happening.....
both were warrantied.


a brass tee stopped that problem, and it never reoccurred.


a plastic tee should work as well, and would be cheaper.

I did install the brass elbow on the first replacement pump.
 

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That's a shame if the Carter NAPA P72190 pumps don't last. I was planning to get one when mine fails.
 

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Those pumps might work out great for you. I just have a knack of finding the bad apple most of the time. I have a next to zero tolerance for UN-dependability. If this OEM pump quits, it will time to send the bike down the road.
 

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That's a shame if the Carter NAPA P72190 pumps don't last. I was planning to get one when mine fails.
This particular pump is a low pressure, rotary vane pump, and it requires the stated flow rate to keep the motor cool...

it is not the motor's windings that burn up, it is the vanes themselves that get hot from friction against the pump's sidewalls when flow ceases.

once the vanes stick against the pump's wall, it can't be moved again, even with force.... I tried it to see what was happening.

the trick to to make darn sure, that the outlet hose is the correct diameter, and that no restriction ever occurs. that means using a Tee connector that allows the outlet line to be straight, or nearly so.


This has the caveat that you must never allow the gas tank to go completely dry..... However, the pump will be turned off the instant the engine quits anyway, it is controlled by the ECM, not the ignition switch.
 

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This particular pump is a low pressure, rotary vane pump, and it requires the stated flow rate to keep the motor cool...

it is not the motor's windings that burn up, it is the vanes themselves that get hot from friction against the pump's sidewalls when flow ceases.

once the vanes stick against the pump's wall, it can't be moved again, even with force.... I tried it to see what was happening.

the trick to to make darn sure, that the outlet hose is the correct diameter, and that no restriction ever occurs. that means using a Tee connector that allows the outlet line to be straight, or nearly so.


This has the caveat that you must never allow the gas tank to go completely dry..... However, the pump will be turned off the instant the engine quits anyway, it is controlled by the ECM, not the ignition switch.
I agree letting the tank get low is hard on the pump but there are times there is very little or no flow through the pump, such as deceleration or at idle, should not hurt it.
 

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