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First, let me say hello. Have a new (still only 535 miles) 2008 Goldwing with Navi/comfort/ABS package. Just graduated from a BMW R1200RT, and I must say what a fine bike the Wing is, comparatively. My question is about brakes. I understand the brakes are linked, as they were on my RT. Do you know what the percentage is of bias, front to rear? Is anyone just using the front brake lever to routinely stop (which many of us did on the RTs)? Is that not a good idea, and why?



Thanks in advance for your help.



Hugh
 

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I read somewhere that its a 70/30, 70 being the front. But the fact is that the front brake alone won't stop the GL1800 fast enough at anything over 30mph and will only slow it down.
 

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Due to the shear size of the wing I also usually use both brakes.
 

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I use the front lever to stop when I'm running around town at low speed. It works for me, but I do tend to pull on the lever harder than if I am using both brakes.
Seeing how front and back are linked, I see no danger of the back wheel sliding out by using only the front lever.
 

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Most of the braking is defiantly in the front, but I don't know what the percentage is. I often catch myself using only the front brake lever for normal stopping or slowing down. I will ride just the rear brake when making slow speed tight turns or U-turns.

For emergency stops I use both brakes, I'm amazed at how good the brakes are.
 

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Thanks for the replies. This was a controversial topic on the BMW forums....just wondered what the consensus here was. Love that Wing....I definitely made the right choice.
 

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On the Honda GoldWing, there are two front disc brakes and one rear disc brake. One of the front brakes is independently controlled by the front brake lever while the other front brake and the rear brake are both activated by the rear brake pedal.



Hmm, the front brakeactuates just one front disk brake and ONLY one front disk brake while the rear brake applys the Rear brake while also appling the other front disk. I would not want to be applying only the Front Brake MOST of the time. Where is the Safety Officer to clear this up?
 

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As I understand it: Each brake caliper has 3 pistons that pump the pads against the rotor. (BTW the pads that actually gets pushed by pistons wears quicker than the other side which is actually being pulled against the rotor). When you compress the front brake I think 2 or maybe all 3 of the pistons on the left front extend (I believe it is usually the quickest of the 3 sets of pads to wear out) and 1 or 2 or the pistons on the right front compress. When you compress the rear brake all 3 of the back brake pistons and some lesser combo of the front pistons extend. The only way you completly get all 9 pistons in all 3 brakes to extend at the same time is to use both brakes in conjunction. At least that is my take on it.
 

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The GL1800 brake system is quite complicated. It has 3 master cylinders; front, rear and secondary. The secondary master cylinder is activated by the upward rotation of the left front caliper. There is also a proportional control valve and an anti-dive valve.

When you squeeze the front brake lever it activates 2 of the 3 cylinders on the right front caliper and 1 of the 3 cylinders on the left front caliper. If the bike is moving the left front caliper rotates up and engages a secondary master cylinder that activates 2 of the 3 cylinders on the rear caliper.

When the foot pedal is depressed it activates 1 of the 3 cylinders on the rear brake caliper, 1 of the 3 cylinders on the right front caliper and 2 of 3 cylinders on the left front caliper. If the bike is moving the left front caliper rotates up and engages a secondary master cylinder that activates 2 of the 3 cylinders on the rear caliper.
 

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Although the GL1800 brake system is quite complicated, it makes me want to go out and buy a new Goldwing, just for the experience. The brakes sound really refined and quite an awesome system. Does the ABS system work exactly the same way, just controlled by a computer generated pulse to keep them from locking up?

FerrariMX5
 

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Ferrarimx5 wrote:
..... Does the ABS system work exactly the same way, just controlled by a computer generated pulse to keep them from locking up?

FerrariMX5
Yes, the ABS bikes work the same way. With the addition of front and rear wheel speed sensors, an ABS control module and front and rear ABS modulators.
 

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Thanks aht_six, for thedefinitive reply which completely answers my question. This is much more sophisticated than the BMW system. I will be using both brake pedals in the future. Thanks so much.



There certainly is a wealth of knowledge on this board!:15grey:
 
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