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Hello all! Ive recently came to own a 81 GL1100I. Its got 40k mi on it and has sat for long time. I've managed to get her running but not for very long between issues. So far they have been minor and fairly easy to fix. I plan on gettin dirty and gaining some intimate knowledge about her this fall. I do have limitedmechanic skills. My question is where shouldI start and what order should I go in? Dont wanna start something and find out that component relies on something that may not be working right either. Please help a newbie!!! Thanks for all your future help.
 

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JB. The first thing I would do is pull the carb rack-clean the float bowls and vacuum pistons, then take the seat off- remove the sending unit and have a look into the gas tank.

How's it run ?
 

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The Irish Crew
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Welcome to the forum. Have you tried running carb cleaner through the system first? Did you replace the old fuel with fresh?
 

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Here's the complete guide to getting a bike back on the road..

http://www.randakks.com/TechTip24.htm

It's for a GL1000 but most of the stuff applies..

minimum..replace timing belts, clean/rebuild carbs, clean/derust gas tank, new gas filter, plugs, change oil, drain and bleed brakes, check front forks replace seals if needed same on rear, pull rear wheel check and regrease splines with moly-paste 60%
 

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Thanks guys for the quick responses! Here's a rundown so far. changed oil, filter, fuel, fuel lines, & fuel filter. Ran seafoam thru carbs. and changed the starter. for awhile she ran great then started to have idle issues. after that, she would start fine then after 20 min or so would lose power and not rev past 1.5k. Still not sure what that was. thanks again for the guidance.
 

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Did you check for rust/crud in the fuel tank. Might be getting something past the filter and clogging the jets again.
 

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Ill definitely check the tank again. how hard would it be for a novice to rebuild the carbs? Biggest one I've ever messed with was on my lawnmower. How much should I expect someone to charge for doing that work?
 

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If you are a bit mechanically inclined you shouldn't have any trouble rebuilding the carbs. They are not that bad to take apart and clean up. If you do a search on this forum you will find lots of info on how to clean the carbs. Be especially careful to clean up the passages for the idle jets. There are a lot of small passages in them and they tend to clog up with old fuel. Take your time and take a lot of pictures of how they look and you should be able to put everything back like it was. If you get stuck come back on here and ask. Someone will get you some help.



I forgot to mention that most motorcycle dealers will not work on these old bikes. If you find someone willing to work on the carbs it will cost somewhere around $400-500. Even then some have had trouble with them after spending that much money. Best to do the job yourself if you want it done right.
 

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Yeah... Don't think i'm gonna be payin anyone that much to rework the carbs. $400-500 is half what I paid for bike. thanks for link. I've joined that forum. this seams a bit better.
 

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Vintage Rider
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All good advice. But the first thing I would do is check the compression of the engine. It should be around 150psi, and not vary more than 10psi between cylinders. Bad compression indicates internal engine problems which you may want to address before continuing with other things. On the other hand, compression is not an absolute, I have seen engines with low compression run just fine, but it still needs to be fairly consistent between cylinders.


Some things need to be done right away, while others can wait. First up is the timing belts. These things rot, especially if the bike has been sitting for a long time, and if one breaks, it will take your engine with it.

Second thing is to completely disassemble the rear end, remove the rear wheel, final drive gear case, and drive shaft, and inspect the splines on the shaft. Clean everything, and lube all the splines with moly paste, most people use Honda moly 60, you will have to order it from a Honda dealer, strangely they rarely stock it. Check your wheel bearings for proper operation, smooth, no rough spots, and make sure they are tight in the wheel. Then put everything back together, and change the oil in the final drive gearcase. Be aware that when you remove the driveshaft from the gearcase, oil will probably run out, so be ready for it. I wasn't and made a mess.


Once you have checked the compression, replaced the timing belts and rear end squared away, you can take more time on the rest of it.

Check brakes for proper operation, check and replace pads if necessary

Change oil, filter, coolant, spark plugs, air filter

Check all the connections in the charging system, from where the stator wires come out of the engine to the R/R. If any are burned or melted cut them out and solder the wires together. Check to make sure it is charging. You should get 13.5V-14V measured across the battery terminals.

Now you can begin the more mundane task of cleaning/rebuilding the carburetors. If your bike is running poorly, this will make a HUGE difference in how it runs. A bike cannot run right with dirty carbs. After sitting there all that time, there is no telling what you might find in there. Cleaning/rebuilding carbs is not as difficult as it might seem, even for a beginner. You can still get kits for these carbs. Get a manual, and take your good easy time. have a lot of patience. The soft metal carbs are made of is easily damaged, so don't try to force anything. If something doesn't want to come apart, soak it in something. I use Kroil, but that is primarily a commercial product. PB Blaster works fairly well. Remove all the carbs at once, mark where they go (I use an electric engraver), and do them one at a time, following the directions in the manual. There are lots of little parts, and they all do something. By the time you get done, you should understand motorcycle carburetors fairly well.

Even after you get it all running right, if you are the least bit mechanically inclined, plan on tinkering with it for a long time. There is a LOT of stuff to do on a Goldwing. You have a classic. Those 1100 Interstates are real lookers compared to later models
 

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yeah, what jerry said, and pretty much in that order
 

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Man, you guys rock! I'll be gettin some time with her this weekend. Really lookin forward to getting my hands dirty. Hope i can get some riding time before it's too cold.
 

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Along with the charging circuit connectors, as you are going through the bike and taking parts off, clean every electrical contact. A brass bristle brush and a quick squirt of brake cleaner into each connector. Clean the crud off and connect and disconnect a couple of times. I have an old points file and use that to scratch each individual pin. It is tedious but necessary to keep the connections clean.
 

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The guys are offering good advice. When the motor runs does it run for long enough time to come up to temperature? If so the temperature may be causing the ignition modules to heat up and fail.

A 1981 has many faults that manifest as a no run. Tackle things one at a time. Verify each.

To start, a compression test will indicate whether the engine makes power, a leak down test tells you more, but at least do a compression test. Understand the compression will go up with an at temperature motor compared to a stone cold motor but make sure the throttle is wide open. Your looking for consistency between cylinders more than a high number. Good numbers are 165 PSIG, but even 120 PSIG will still work at repairs at about 135-140. Bjut these numbers are only indicators.

Biggest problems that do occur stem from: carb, cylinder balance at low RPM, dirty fuel system, bad rubber on belts and seals, pressure release or vacuum release within the tank.

Low voltage will also cause what is taking place. Easy diagnoses: Measure the battery voltage across the battery terminals at start, idle and 3000 RPM. This easy method will indicate if your battery and charging system is goog.
full stop----12.7
While starting---no lower than 10
At idle----from 12.7-14
At 3000--at max----15

All systems within that bike must be in good shape: mechanical, electrical, hydraulic, all wires, cables and all joints.

Experience has proved to me that the electrical system and its normal aging wears down the ability of the bike to run properly. Be sure to check every system and don't over look anything, the happy result will be in the details you work on and verify.

Happy riding!
 
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