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I NEED HELP! I REBUILT THE TWO FRONT CALIPERS ON MY GL1200 . THE LEFT CALIPER I USED THE SPRAYER HEAD METHOD WITH CLEAR TUBING ATTACHED TO THE BLEEDER WORKED OUT GREAT. NOW I AM TRYING TO BLEED THE RIGHT SIDE AND ALL I GET IS A SPONGY PEDAL THAT FALLS TO THE BOTTOM WITH LITTLE RESITANCE ANY IDEAS?
 

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The right side caliper is compbined with the rear caliper.

Bleed the rear first, then the front right.
 

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THANKS I WILL TRY THAT TODAY
 

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tricky wrote:
The right side caliper is compbined with the rear caliper.

Bleed the rear first, then the front right.
I just finished my brakes yesterday and this worked best for me. I used the cheap 7.00 autozone speed bleeder kit and had my wife do the pedals :action:New brakes all around is a wonderful thing :)

Ride Safe, Ray

:waving:
 

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let the system sit overnight . blead the rear then right front seems to be o.k.
 

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Seems to me that it would be best to bleed the front first as it is farther from the master cylinder. That's the way I do it but then I'm no expert. :?
 

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[/b]This method uses a strong and constant vacuum to pull the fluid and air out through the bleeder quickly and easily -- there is no pussyfooting. The vacuum method is not new, but this method is inexpensive and the surest method to purge trapped air. With strong and steady suction, the both air and fluid are swiftly sucked out the bleeder.



[/b]Two snug holes are drill in the jar lid and then two pieces of hose are cut to length as needed. The 1/4” hose is the vacuum hose and it goes in one inch. The 3/8” hose is the bleeder suction hose and goes to the bottom. The 3/8” hose is used here because it fits on the bleeder fitting. Don’t add fluid to the jar -- it fills quickly. Open the reservoir filler cap and fill to brim. Open the first bleeder wide for maximum flow – it’s important. Attach the ¼” vacuum hose below the throttle plate vacuum somewhere and then apply the 3/8” bleeder suction hose to the first bleeder. Suction out a few ounces or until its looks clean then move to the next. If your system has any of the extra components like equalizers for front/rear brakes or anti-lock brakes, you must find and bleed them, they could be the reason for trapped air.



The ¼” and 3/8” hose can slip together as in the picture and small piece make good adapters. You can use any size hose you want. The jar doubles as a collection container and vacuum reservoir; and captures the waste fluid so it does not enter the engine. Don’t over fill the container and suck it in the engine -- it smokes! Open the bleeders wide for maximum volume flow -- this is most important. Swift, steady flow sucks out the trapped air. The pump-and-squirt method pressurizes the system and the air is forced into the high cavities. Suction depressurizes and siphons the air away! You will only see foaming vacuum bubbles coming from the bleeders – the air bubbles blend in. The fluid never gets clear -- just streaming foam. You should really have an assistant to pour in brake fluid -- as it goes down fast, but you can manage alone. An uncapped reservoir will shoot fluid out if pumped -- watch the eyes. You probably can skip applying grease around the loose fittings. Small leaks in the hose setup are okay with plenty of vacuum to spare, no need to get fanatical. If you really want to make sure all air is purged, pump-and-squirt one last time with a small crack of the bleeder.



[/b]If you a Shop VAC, a flat piece of material will firmly plant itself against the end of the vacuum hose, so drill a ¼” hole and insert the vacuum hose, then turn on vacuum and it will hold itself in place.



[/b]Bleeding the system is to purge air. Spongy or no brakes means air in the system. Bleeding is simple if there is no trapped air. First, try the simple method as it does work often. Pump the brakes, hold the peddle down, then open and close the bleeder. If you release before closing the bleeder, it sucks air in. Repeat until only fluid squirts out. If this fails, it’s because it moves too little too slow. One pump equals one squirt – it only nudges trapped air. One vacuum application can suck the system dry in less than a minute or two. It’s a breeze changing and flushing fluid. The idea is to move trapped air faster than it can move backwards. Vacuum action leaves no bubble behind.



[/b]After much wasted time and frustration I made this gadget. It’s never failed me on any vehicle, even anti-lock systems. It’s one of the best homemade devises I have made. I still have the original Lipton Instant Tea jar with plastic lid. I never tried it with a Shop VAC, only my 4-cylinder S-10. Finally, after years of trying all the tricks of the trade, I beat a most frustrating job with killer simple homemade jar gadget! It makes me smile.

 

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