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It is not the meter you are using, it is just the phrasing of how you worded it.
We can't see where, or how you are testing the stator.

The stator must be tested independently of any other wiring on the bike, the regulator must be disconnected from the 3 yellow wires coming out of the stator.

Grounding one lead of the Fluke, and touching any one of the 3 yellow wires (from the stator) with the Ohm Meter position on "say, the 1k ohms scale" and you see any continuity to ground at all, the stator is bad...

And, as Ken said, since all 3 windings are tied to a common point, if any one of the 3 windings has a bad place, and the winding touches the frame, all 3 windings will show a path to ground.
Or, "shorted to ground" in laymen's terms.

I'm a life long electronic's tech, and showing someone "hands on" is a lot easier than trying to explicitly make sure that the words we write down make it clear to someone else what we are doing.
 

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Here's a YouTube link to check the wires,
 

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The YouTube link is just one way to test a stator, it obviously can be done "live" while the engine is running. All 3 yellow wires should give an equal A/C voltage reading to ground.

The video states 4 VAC, so I assume that is "typical", but I have never had to test a stator on any of the two 1200s that I owned.


If the yellow wires are disconnected, and you make a running voltage test, from any yellow wire, to any other yellow wire, all 3 legs should be equal..... somewhere between 50 VAC and 70 VAC.

and the engine running 2500 rpm or more.
 

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Junior Grue
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The video states 4 VAC, so I assume that is "typical", but I have never had to test a stator on any of the two 1200s that I owned.
In the video Steve is testing for VDC. :surprise:
I've always felt that his test tells you more about the rectifier diodes than the stator but what do I know?:ROFL:
 

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In the video Steve is testing for VDC. :surprise:
I've always felt that his test tells you more about the rectifier diodes than the stator but what do I know?:ROFL:
That to me, has always been a very squirrelly type test, and I personally would not put any faith in it at all for DC from an AC source.

so, yes, it is the result of the rectifiers, and therefore, you have no way of knowing if the stator is bad, or if the regulator is causing the problem.

so, back to basics, Divide and Conquer..... that has always been my moto....
Ergo, open up the Yellow Wires and test ONLY the stator for AC voltage... nothing else is accurate.
 

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Just Winging It
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I never tested mine for continuity.

I test at the battery with a fully charge battery at 3k rpm should have 14V no more than 15v and no less than 13v.

Have you done this test?

 

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A stator exchange including the reg/reg and gaskets can be done in one day. Dropping the engine is not that hard because part of the frame unbolts. The cost would be under $400.

The poorboy seems to take 3 days to a week and cost just over $600.

The stator issues on these bike was due to the stator plug over heating otherwise the stator last 200k miles or more.

I think the poorboy is more difficult than pulling the engine.

Test the volts at the battery at 3k rpm
 

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Ergo, open up the Yellow Wires and test ONLY the stator for AC voltage... nothing else is accurate.
Even that can be misleading.
I once had 300 yards of wire with 26VAC at the input end measured with a digital multi-meter and the same at the output end with a known to be good relay connected but it wouldn't power the relay.
I attached an analog volt meter in parallel with the digital one at the relay and at first it showed the same 26VAC but slowly dropped to zero while the digital meter remanded at 26VAC.:surprise:
 

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the world of electronics can be confusing at times, and with a long wire run like you just described, there can be inductance situations to be considered, and possible poor connections in between that would allow a high resistance to show up with full voltage on a Digital DVM, but with an analog meter that actually requires a bit of current to make it work, it would show a lessor value.

Put a load on the end of that long run of wire, and retest again and get the true condition of that length of wire. :)

So many things to consider, when testing in the world of electricity....
Even on DC volts stuff, poor resistance connections will show "good on a DVM" and in service, be an "open circuit".
 

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the world of electronics can be confusing at times, and with a long wire run like you just described, there can be inductance situations to be considered, and possible poor connections in between that would allow a high resistance to show up with full voltage on a Digital DVM, but with an analog meter that actually requires a bit of current to make it work, it would show a lessor value.
That was exactly the case, a poor connection.

The point is that the stator has many yards of wire and even though a DVM may show acceptable potential voltage a high resistance somewhere in the wire may prevent that potential being cared as an amperage.
 
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