Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Put my Valk on CL and have had 3 inquiries. All 3 responded that the mileage (62k) was too high. I know that 62k is barely broke in for these bikes but people seem to think Harley when they deal with mileage on on a bike.

Sorry, just had to rant a little.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,445 Posts
imported post

You don't want your Valk going to someone that doesn't know bikes anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,106 Posts
imported post

i dunno what high miliage really is each bike people think diffrent miliage


my old wing's got 65k on it and people go oh my god thats so low of miliage..... i dunno

a touring bike should have high miliage thats what they are built for , a street or intown bike well it shouldnt have a butt load of miles


ive been seeing goldwings 1800's ect sell with over 100k on them and they run as good as they did from day 1

you'll find a buyer
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,132 Posts
imported post

I would respond back, in a nice way, that since their knowledge of the bikes abilities, triumphs and workings are so lacking in their thinking, that its a good thing their not buying a bike capable of a few hundred thousand miles, nor in your good conscience could you sell it to them now.

Scammers are always looking for a deal, Id be willing to bet some of them will call you back and give you a low ball offer......... when they try that with me, I just ask, "What changed" The condition of the item didn't?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,910 Posts
imported post

Never saw any data on bikes, but I read, a few years ago, some Gov't stats on cars' & small trucks' longevity. They were defininga vehicle's "half-life". The half-life was determined to be the point (in time) where one half of all the vehicles built in any model year, were no longer in service or considered to be economically serviceable. For cars, the half-life was determined to be ~150,000 miles, and for small trucks, ~185,000 miles. I think that "killers" like crash accidents, fires, etc. were merely included in total life span stats, and would have an adverse effect on the stats, but so would those vehicles that got "pampered" their whole life, so a half-life should only be used without emotion, for fiscal decision-making.

Now, surely one wouldn't expect an average car, for example, with 150k on it, would be expected to have another 150k left in it. Any car with typical service maintenance, has used up the best part of its actual life span at 150k miles.

If one has taken any "statistics" type of training at all, one should have learned that most studies are illustrated with a standard "Bell Curve". There will always be stories of vehicles going with outlandish bu-ku miles on them, but one must ask...were they driven in the Northern States, where so much salt is used every winter? Not likely. A marketable used vehicle must have more to offer than a good engine.

I have seen engineering test data on sealed, caged ball bearings, for example, where the projected service life was totally dependent on the RPM they were normallyused at, along with the actual "grade" of the bearings. High RPM translated directly into statistically, predictably shorter life. Teens will generally drive anything faster & harder than Grandads will.

Oops! Too wordy...stopping now. Sorry 'bout that. :( :waving:
 

·
Postpubescent member
Joined
·
36,382 Posts
imported post

No reason in the world why a well kept 'Wing, or Valk for that matter, wouldn't run 200,000-250,000 miles without major repairs. One '93 in my area has 365,000 miles on it and is still running well. The six cylinder 'Wings especially have slow turning, relatively low performance engines for their size and displacement. This means less piston travel per mile, lower rpm operation and cooler running all of which promote longer engine life. The transmissions are robust compared to smaller, high revving sport bikes which also means long operational life. Unfortunately most people in North America seem to think that 100,000 miles is a high mileage vehicle and not worth much when in truth a reasonably well kept modern vehicle isn't half way to the junk yard at that point.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21 Posts
imported post

Hi Fritz, I have a 2006 wing and I have 66,000 miles on it already. I know it's not a lot for some wings but, I ride it thru heavy traffic out here in the baltimore and D.C. area and it runs as good as it did when it was new. So, you shouldn't have a problem at all selling your bike for a good price. The people that posted apparently don't know how good these engines really are. They are used to a Harley that usually needs a major repair by 62k. Keep it posted, you will find someone that knows how good it is.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
imported post

Thanks Red. Gonna do it but still gonna ride it till it sells. She's a sweet Valk but my Wing is sweeter.

Talk about an under appreciated Wing, She's a lowly Interstate and probably next to impossible to sell but she's been a perfect ride for the last 3 years I've owned her. I've put about 33k miles on her which is more than she had on her when I bought her. And that's been 33k miles of flawless running. Never a problem and never a let down.

And on a related note, I recently went on my annual Hillbilly ride to the mountains of Western NC. I had planned to take the Valkyrie and had her all loaded up the night before. Next morning I rolled her out the garage at 6am.

She wouldn't crank.

I ran the starter till the battery went dead and she never even hinted at firing. It was then that I realized the problem. Being used to a GW meant I wasn't used to a petcock. Yep, it was closed. :whinger: But it was too late, the battery was dead so I rolled her back in the garage and transferred everything to the Wing. In spite of doing zero prep to the Wing (didn't even check the air in the tires), she performed flawlessly and was a joy to ride.

What happened to the Valk was totally my fault. Got back, charged the battery, opened the petcock and she fired right up and ran perfectly on a 200 mile local ride. Even tho I love both bikes, I only have room for one. I decided I love the lowly 1500 Interstate more so the Valk is up for sale.

Moral of the story is... Once you've had the best, all else is chaff.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top