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1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
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Discussion Starter #1
My 1985 GL1200 is having a charging problem. The other day I was cruising down the freeway and when the cooling fan kicked in I started to loose power. I got off the freeway and headed to a parking lot. When I tried to start it again I noticed that my battery was low - almost dead. I was able to get it started and back home. On further inspection, i noticed that one of the alternator wires was burned and disconnected. Today I was able to repair the connection.

Here's the question: After the repair I started the engine with a voltage tester on the battery terminals. I noticed a high voltage over 16.5v. The wires coming from the alternator are warm to the touch. Is my voltage regulator bad? I have other wires that seem warm to the touch too going to/from the solenoid. Any ideas would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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3 factors can make the charging voltage high, a bad ground to the regulator, low voltage on the black wire to the regulator or a bad battery. The wires from the alternator to the regulator do get very warm normally, the wires on the solenoid should not, look for bad connections at the solenoid.
 

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1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
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Discussion Starter #3
3 factors can make the charging voltage high, a bad ground to the regulator, low voltage on the black wire to the regulator or a bad battery. The wires from the alternator to the regulator do get very warm normally, the wires on the solenoid should not, look for bad connections at the solenoid.
Thanks. I'll check out your suggestions. The battery is good and holds a charge well. The solenoid connectors had melted a few weeks back, not sure why. I fixed that. I'll check the regulator ground and the voltage on the black wire. Took it for a spin anyway and it died on me 1/2 block from work. I was able to get it started again. I'm at work now. Hopefully, I can cripple it home this afternoon and check out the ground. It's a little complicated since I have made my Goldwing into a reverse trike. I'm a little worried about the loads on the wiring. So far things seem ok, but I need to keep monitoring it.

323351

323352
 

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02 GL1800 w/Auto Pilot
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Nice job on that trike build up Ray,
really enjoyed our phone visit.

Best to you

John
 

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Cool ride. Is that a VW front axle?
 

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1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
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Discussion Starter #6
I used a Karmann Ghia front end because it has disk brakes. The pan is from a vw bug. I cut it off just behind the front seats.
 

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1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
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Discussion Starter #7
3 factors can make the charging voltage high, a bad ground to the regulator, low voltage on the black wire to the regulator or a bad battery. The wires from the alternator to the regulator do get very warm normally, the wires on the solenoid should not, look for bad connections at the solenoid.
The black wire has 14.25 volts. Checked the ground and the connections. Had a bad connection on the regulator plug. I was able to clean it up somewhat, but found a good used one online. Should be here this week.

I took it out for a spin on Friday and it ran ok, but yesterday it wouldn't start. No spark. I hope I didn't burn out the Ignition Control Module. I will need to go through all the wiring again.
 

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1993 GL1500 Aspy 1980 GL1100 STD
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You didn't maybe bump the "kill" switch? o_O
 

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I think there is a chance you have 2 separate issues. The not start sympton is typical of a common failure on those bikes. Maybe the pulse generators are failing.

As for the high charging voltage I see an issue. The circuit the regulator uses to sense battery voltage flows as follows on a regular Wing. The current flows from the battery to and through the ignition switch. From the ignition switch ,if on, current flows to the regulator. Using this information you can see that if all is well the voltage at the regulator should be very close to the battery voltage. You mentioned that the battery voltage was 16,5 volts while the black wire was just over 14 volts. That is a problem as when the battery is at 16.5 volts the regulator things all is good at 14 volts or so..

You mentioned that the battery voltage was 16,5 volts while the black wire was just over 14 volts. That is a problem as when the battery is at 16.5 volts the regulator thinks all is good at 14 volts or so.. Obviously there is high resistance in the circuit from the battery, to the ignition switch or from the ignition switch to the regulator. Most common on a stock bike is the ignition switch has high resistance. (poor connection internal) If that is true most just add a relay from the battery positive to the regulator.

With all this taken in to consideration it is at least possible that the ignition switch is bad enough that it does not have the ability to supply adequate voltage to start the bike at times. I would be interested to know if the voltage at the coils is 10 volts or greater when the thing won't start?????? :unsure:
 

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1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
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Discussion Starter #11
I replaced the regulator and the solenoid and everything is working again. It started fine and the voltage was back into the normal range. I'm still concerned about the heat generated by the alternator wires. But I ran it around for 30 minutes and it seemed to be ok even though the wires were kind of hot. I did have a falter on the engine but it recovered and didn't do it again. I'll need to do some more short runs before I can trust it fully.
Thanks for all the advice.
 

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Do you have a stock stator charging system or a poorboy alternator?
 

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I replaced the regulator and the solenoid and everything is working again. It started fine and the voltage was back into the normal range. I'm still concerned about the heat generated by the alternator wires. But I ran it around for 30 minutes and it seemed to be ok even though the wires were kind of hot. I did have a falter on the engine but it recovered and didn't do it again. I'll need to do some more short runs before I can trust it fully.
Thanks for all the advice.
That system is known to hake heat. The system runs wide open all the time. Any unused power is shunted and returned to ground. It never slows down or shuts off current regardless of the battery charge condition. It os too bad you did not find out that there is an improved regulator before you purchased the one you have. The nrw MOFSET type regulators actually turn down or off the stator when the battery is fully charged. Easier on the stator and runs much cooler.

 

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1985 Honda Goldwing GL1200
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Discussion Starter #15
That system is known to hake heat. The system runs wide open all the time. Any unused power is shunted and returned to ground. It never slows down or shuts off current regardless of the battery charge condition. It os too bad you did not find out that there is an improved regulator before you purchased the one you have. The nrw MOFSET type regulators actually turn down or off the stator when the battery is fully charged. Easier on the stator and runs much cooler.

I just bought a used stock regulator. I didn't know about the MOFSET regulator. I'll have to keep that in mind if I need to replace again.
 

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the MOFSET versions run much cooler
 

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1993 GL1500 Aspy 1980 GL1100 STD
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Just remember there's two types of MOSFET regulators, you can find both MOSFET standard Shunt regulators and MOSFET "Series" regulators, these block excess current rather than shunting it.
 

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Just remember there's two types of MOSFET regulators, you can find both MOSFET standard Shunt regulators and MOSFET "Series" regulators, these block excess current rather than shunting it.
So which would be the best choice in your opinion?
 

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Been following, best choice would be a series RR. Three that I know of, Shindengen SH847 - 50 amp unit - needs to be relocated because of size - inside of the right side saddlebag is a good location. Know of one installed in this location. Compu Fire 55402 - 40 amp unit - same location as SH847, and the SH775 series RR - older technology but a series RR - may fit in same location.
 

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Just remember there's two types of MOSFET regulators, you can find both MOSFET standard Shunt regulators and MOSFET "Series" regulators, these block excess current rather than shunting it.
SERIES IS THE BEST...

WHY? it restricts the amount of current flow to ONLY what is needed.
It is Phase Angle sensitive, and interrupts the current flow when the voltage reaches the shutoff point of ~14.3ish volts ( this means no heavy current being shunted to ground )

the rotor runs cooler, and the winds won't burn up with a Series Regulator.

Shunt Regulators were designed because "at the time" it was the best technology available.
 
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