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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There have been quite a few questions being asked on here lately on how to bleed your brake lines and clutch lines. A few years ago I posted to an existing thread about my fancy pants electric homemade electric vacuum bleeding machine that I used to replace my Brake fluid and fork oil with.

It was a little air mattress inflator hooked up to a mason jar. The little diaphragm pump sucked the air out of the mason jar and that in turn drew out the fluid out of the system being worked on. The old fluid was collected in the Mason jar. A great little set up… until this year. (Pic 1)

I went to use it this year and found that the pumps rubber diaphragm had rotted out – probably from the fumes from the items I was sucking up.

Earlier in the spring I was going to replace my brake and clutch lines with stainless steel braided lines. As usual, life kicked in and I had to put that money else ware and the sheer amount of time I was going to need to replace these properly did not interest me at the time. That is until I found this balloon ready to pop. (Pic 2)

Long story short I had to replace the lines. I also had to come up with a way to evacuate the air out of the lines in a way that I could bleed them in one shot and be done with it, without having to go back and do it over and over and over until they were finally air free.

Time to put on the old thinking cap…
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I knew that I wanted to have the same style of setup… a vacuum of fluid into a glass jar. I also wanted it robust so that it would last. I also wanted it adjustable for the delicate work and slow draining.

BEHOLD FLUID VAC 2013 !! ;)

This adjustable vacuum bottle cost me about $10.00 in parts. I needed the plastic “tap” and the ABS compression fitting. The rest I had from the old set up.

As you can probably tell from the pictures, I took the ABS fitting and heated it up with my heat gun and then took a hose clamp and tightened it around the “tap”. It made a relatively good seal and there was no need to finish sealing it with silicone or other such sealant. I then took a drill and made a hole in the ABS fitting to attach the large hose that goes to the “pickle jar”.

Inside the pickle jar the smaller hose extends, via brass fittings, into it by a few inches so the fluid will not make a 90 degree bend in mid air and get sucked right into the vacuum cleaner. Yes… you read it right… vacuum cleaner. The smaller hose attached to the bleeder nipple of the system you’re working on.

This is all powered by a regular shop vacuum with its hose pushed into the ABS compression fitting. I figure I might as well use a good vacuum source to start with… one I already had.

Basically, it works like this… Normally, with the size of vacuum I have, I use it with the valve open. Most of the air is being drawn through it. Still, enough vacuum is being created to effectively drain your lines. If I need to suck up a thicker fluid, I can start to close the valve and gain more suction. There will be more “draw” on the “pickle jar” side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I can tell you from my experience that I can add fluid to an empty reservoir and set the valve to “medium” (1/2 way) and just add more fluid to the reservoir as it goes down. It took about 45 to 60 seconds to do my clutch before fluid was coming out of the bleeder nipple. At that point I simply closed the bleeder nipple, topped of the reservoir and slowly worked the clutch handle a few times to release the small amount of air that was at the top of the ribbed piston (the only way to get that air out). That air bubbled up into the reservoir and minute bubbles.

The front brake was done the same way as was the linked back / front ones were. No further bleeding was necessary. PERIOD!

I even made a video!

http://youtu.be/jHnEkIyAozU

Tim
 

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:claps:

Keep a spare jar or two on the shelf in case of original breakage.

You don't want to find out a few years down the road that your good cap will not fit a replacement PLASTIC jar.;)
 

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Great Idea!
 

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Nice job.

Any concern warrented, for using an electric motor within a flammable environment?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Alex,

I would never suck up a volatile substance like a fuel, alcohol or paint thinner or solvent.

I do not believe that the vapors off brake fluid are flammable… ummm… I hope not!

I have not had any issues with it to this point in any respect. Good caution to bring up though.

Tim.
 

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Of course, you could use engine vacuum...........all you would need is a jar and some tubing. Any "vapors" would be burned, and 8-10" vacuum would be easier to control.

**This looks suspiciously like the alcohol injection system I used on my '68 barracuda.....**
 

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Here is my commercial duty one, an A/C evacuation pump and ER Room medical suction container.:coollep:

Up until about 2002 is when Ford stopped putting AT torque converter drain plugs in. Prior to that the severe service vehicles would get an AT fluid change every 50k and was easy to do without pulling the pan. While in the air drain the converter, bring it down and suck the rest out (5qts) the trans dipstick tube emptying the pan.:ssshh: Throw your 12qts in and down the road.

Ford AOD fluid filters never plugged up unless there was a major failure.:)

Nowadays you got to hook it up to a special machine to change fluid.:whip:
 

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That's an idea..hook up a hose to the vacuum port on the intakes then to bleeder value, starter her up and open the bleeder...rev her up if needed until fluid flows w/o bubbles..now why didn't I think of that.
 

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That's an idea..hook up a hose to the vacuum port on the intakes then to bleeder value, starter her up and open the bleeder...rev her up if needed until fluid flows w/o bubbles..now why didn't I think of that.
I was, of course, suggesting using the bottle. I don't think I'd want to burn too much brake fluid in the cylinder..................
 

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Mity Vac - About $30.00

 

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Kool Idea ya...

I have the same basic principle with the jar and (shopvac) and I have mounted 2 adaptor

One To bleed brakes & Clutch and second with a steel brake line and a stopper at proper lenth to remove or ajuste proper level of fork fluid.

So every spring this kit is used to flush brakes,clutch, and fork fluid

I love it.
 

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I've had a couple of vacuum bleeders, including a Mity Vac. When I got the Goldwing I discovered SpeedBleeders, and now don't understand why anyone would do it any other way.
 
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