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Look for a starter from a Honda that has the engine facing left, all the older 4 cylinders turn the same direction as the 6 cyl wing.
 

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1965 Hillman Imp
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Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Yeah I'm hopeful that the counter clockwise rotating honda engines use a starter that also rotates backwards. However I imagine they just use a standard direction starter but mount it from the other side.

If so and honda starters aren't an option to get me out of this pickle then I've got a solution that should work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #63 ·
So in a mild state of panic I leaped out of bed and while Hannah cooked our porridge for breakfast I coupled the block to the gearbox. Luckily there is plenty of room to mount the starter from the engine side. In fact - it may well be a better place because the stock position on the subaru bell housing has the rather large, reduction geared starter sit quite high and close to the underside of the Imps parcel shelf.

I'll take some photos soon and pop them up.

@DaveO430 - I'm just very thankful that you had thought about my project enough to spot my error! The power of a good forum and how we can help each other! 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #64 ·
....and yes! It does indeed look like Honda 4 pot starters must rotate backwards because a 1992 honda accord has the starter slung over the gearbox...
326553


At a glance that image above looks like it shows a starter very similar to the Subaru item I have.
The pinion tooth pitch will be the next issue - there is every chance that Honda use larger or smaller teeth on the ring gear.
I will pop to a car wreckers yard and compare a few starter motors against my Subaru one and see how they might match.
 

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Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Update time! But to save my sanity I might do it in two lots.

So a fella on oldschool forum here in NZ pointed out that many bikes don't run tensioners. So I looked into motorbike oil pump chains and yeah- bugger all have tensioners and they actually run quite loose. I then decided to scrap the idea of spring loaded tensioners because even with the ones I had they were still a bit awkward to fit and didn't quite work in the angle I would have wanted.

So enter stage left my new adjustable tensioner device...



which fits like this...







The bolts that clamp it down are actually accessible from below with the sump plate removed so once the chains wear to a point that I'm not happy with I can tension them independently. The will be nyloc nuts replacing those normal nuts on the tensioner bolts when the final assembly takes place.

So with that finally finished I moved on down. The sump cover. It has to be fairly beefy because it could see some hits plus the engine will rest on it when on the bench. It has to be alloy so It can be used as a useful heat sink to pull heat from the oil. It has to look cool for when the Barries look under the car. So some fins were in order.

I bought a big lump of alloy from Ulrich aluminium.

That hurt.

I put it through the old table saw and did some rough cuts just to save on time milling...



Into the mill and did milly things. It was going to take bloody ages thought so I made a new tool which I shall call the DDC.

'Dewalt drill control' ...



It could always be an MDC. Makita drill control. My cunning design is adaptable.

In action...



Groovy man...



Then the sides taken down...



I stopped there. The bit that is left unslotted will be machined to suit a recessed sump plug. I wont do any more until I finish the front cover below the cambelts where I'll also be adding some engine mount points.

Next up was to finish the adaptor plate that connects the engine to the gearbox bellhousing.

I had machined a bunch of pedestals to an exact length I had worked out to suit the positioning of the spigot shaft on the end of the first motion shaft into the spigot bearing. These pedestals have been machined on the gearbox end to locate within the dowel like spot faced bolt holes on the bellhousing. This way there was no chance of any float in any direction - the box would always be perfectly concentric to the engines crank and the bolts are really just clamping it.

I bolted it all up together...







Then cut some strips of 4mm alloy plate and started bending them to suit. Connecting the pedestals...







 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Once I was happy with the fit up of those filler strips I ran a marker pen around them and took it all apart. Then cut the plate back to the lines in the bandsaw.

Well I did so for a while but due to several things including the bandsaw having a totally rooted bearing collapse in the saws gearbox so making blade run off the driving wheel. plus the only course pitch blade having some missing teeth I ended up using the jigsaw.

Anyway- got there in the end. Pieced it back together and it looked like this...



Now time to weld it all together. I knew this was going to be tricky because the whole lot is like one huge heatsink and our current power cable to the workshop and the subsequent circuit breakers I have installed as a safety net wont allow me to run the welder at enough amps for such a mass of alloy - sit on 150 amps for any longer then 20 secs and it would trip. If I had a big enough oven I'd heat the whole lot up together nice and slowly. But I don't. So I just had to be strategic about it and work fast because once I stopped welding the heat soon dispersed. Luckily the welds just have to be strong and functional because it would all be smoothed down with a flap disc for a more factory casting look I wanted.









It turned out good and best of all it hadn't warped so the box still fitted correctly and neatly. I was happy with that and it was now time to move on to the next stage which was the starter motor fitment. That will be in the next exciting instalment :)
 

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That is going to be the most modified goldwing engine in history. Wish I had you machinery and talent.
 
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Nice work boots!
 
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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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that is one awesome job you have done there, looking forward to more episodes on your progress
 

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Discussion Starter · #72 ·
I'm sure he does that to insure a good ground for welding.:cool:
Rayjoe
Haha - that's exactly what I had told someone elsewhere when they commented. Makes for better welding..... :)

Thanks everyone for the nice comments- I'm glad you're all enjoying the progress reports. I think what will really be interesting and more useful to you all will be when I start on the induction and engine management. I'll be looking to build a setup on a sensible budget using easily available parts so that the Goldwing bike owners can replicate it if they want. Not that there is anything wrong with the two carbs found on a 1500 but we cant deny that injection with full management including spark opens up a whole world of easier, better tuning, better economy and potential for performance gains.

Alex
 

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This is crazy fun to follow along with.
 
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Piaggio MP3, was 02 GL1800
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Did I really see someone welding and standing on their Bare Feet ??


 

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1965 Hillman Imp
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Discussion Starter · #75 ·
Yep. Often grinding etc too. I do wear boots when doing things like tree work with chain saws, mowing and when its bloody cold or having to dress up for town etc but yeah - I and quite a lot of Kiwis (especially in the district we live in which is sort of a bit hippy spec) are barefoot a lot of the year. Cant explain why - its just a thing we've grown up with since being free range kids at the beach etc. I just so happened to be shoeless when starting the welding and there's a wood stove nearby in the workshop so it was warm enough.

I do keep the shop floor swept very clean and am well aware of risky metal shards created when doing some machining so that's a no go zone even for my leathery feet :LOL:
 

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I grew up in the sandy part of Oklahoma, and was mostly bare foot except for going to school.
My parents told me to "take off your school shoes now!" the minute we got home, we were only able to get one pair a year back then.

Today, I wear flip flop sandals nearly all the time, unless riding a bike, or the weather is very cold.
 

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Discussion Starter · #77 ·
It must certainly be to do with where kids grow up and the attitudes in those areas. Its the same here- especially in our region that has pretty temperate weather with long hot summers. We always see kids school groups in town, led by the teachers. All the kids will be wearing sunhats, which is a big thing done for years now in NZ due to risk of sunburn etc and many of the kids will be barefoot. We see kids throughout summer walking to and from school barefoot, shoes in their hands. They are just used to it. It does feel nice to feel the ground- not in a hippy sort of way. Its just a nice connection.
Flip flops are the default safety shoe here.. That next level of protection :)
 

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I grew up on "truck farm" meaning if it has roots we planted it and harvested it and set it on the back porch, a sign out front showing what was in season.

I sold milk for 85 cents /gallon.



Our place was pure white sand

, add rain and anything grows.

Oh, Straw hats were always on our heads
 

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Welding barefoot, teaches you to be a good welder.
Just like welding on your lap in shorts. 🤡

326905
 

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Very impressive and nice work to fabricate this new drivetrain.
I remember these Hilman Imp cars from my youth, where some were also used in motor sport, - with "Fracer" tuning kit (if you could afford it) which could also include a roof lowering kit!
I can see on your footwear (missing) that your broom and vacuum cleaner must be more effective than mine!
 
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