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Hi everyone, :waving:

I have a 1978 HONDA GOLDWINGGL1000

I am having trouble and I think it may be the end of my ride. :sadguy:

I went to top off my radiator and after a moment or so I noticed water going into the carbs and leaking out of the carbs onto the ground.

The bike was riding fine just pryor to this and I need to know if it is possible something cracked inside the engine to cause this to happen and if I can repair it?

Could there have been to much water in the radiator when it was stored over the winter and froze causing something to crack? like a car engine except car engines have freeze plugs to prevent cracking of the block.

HELP!:praying:

THANK YOU!!!!
 

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Older and Wiser
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Welcome to the forum kakoron. You really need to post your question in the Technical forum, that's where all the gurus check-in to help.
 

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:waving::waving::waving: HI!
 

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Odd. Were you topping it off at the radiator or at the overflow? That would have to be a major crack for any fluid to do what you're describing. Could it be something else for fluid and coincidental?

If it was running fine just prior to topping it off, how is it running now? It should be obvious but you didn't say. A compression check would show a bad head gasket or a possible cracked head.

Without being pressurized, I don't see how you could get a volume of water to do what you're describing...
 

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Happy Goldwinger
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Could the leak be coming from the crossover pipes on top of the engine? They are made of very thin metal and can corrode through or break easily.
 

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plus one on the crossover tube on top of the motor making it look like it was coming from the carbs
 

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Vintage Rider
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I agree about the crossover tubes. I actually see no way for coolant to get into the carbs. A bad head gasket, or cracked head or case could let coolant into the cylinder, and into the oil, but the carbs on a Goldwing are ABOVE the cylinders, and liquid doesn't run uphill, with the engine running, there is negative pressure (a vacuum) in the carbs, and an engine would not run with the carbs full of coolant anyway.
 

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HI, :waving:

The bike runs well. before discovering the problem and after drying out the carbs.

I just can't fill the radiatior full.

Why? I would sure like to know.

No, the bike was not running when I filled it it was only after I was running it and shut it down. then I topped off the radiator.

I wish I had pics of the internals so I could see what it intails.

It was suggestedI could have a blown head gasket and still not have any water in the oil.... I don't know??

Are head gaskets a pain to replace?

there was no water were the pipes cross over the top of the engine only down in the square opening under the air filter cover and pouring out bottom of the carbs.

This could be an illusion and the pipes could be leaking near the carbs... but how did the water get in the carbs???

Again bike runs fine... I let it run idle for 45 mins with cooling fan on and it did not over heat.. so there must be enough water in the radiator even tho it is very low.

Beats me???

If anyone has had anything like this happen to them or are familiar with this description the help would be very welcome.

Thank you , all of you for your suggestions and questions.

Enjoy the open road.
 

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kakoron wrote:
car engines have freeze plugs to prevent cracking of the block
As an aside- So called "Freeze plugs" are actually "Core plugs"...a place to remove the casting sand/material from the block. Core plugs may push out if a block freezes up, but that does not mean they will stop the block from cracking elsewhere.

Hope you get your Wing running soon.
 

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Thanks for the freeze plug update!
Alright I filled the radiator with water to see if I could wittness where the water is comming from, nowhere till I turned it over ... now the water is comming out of the right side exhaust pipe... no water in carbs... maybe if I fired it over but the water comming out of the exhaust will give help to figuring this out... head gasket?
 

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HOW COMPLICATED IS IT TO CHANGE A HEAD GASKET?
DON'T LOOK TO COMPLICATED...
ANYONE?
 

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It isn't a hard job but cleaning old gaskets is always tedious. You can do it without pulling the radiator but it is easier with the radiator out because the belts have to come out.
OEM head gaskets are about $45 each and they are the ones you want. There seems to be a high failure rate for aftermarket head gaskets (and waterpumps). While your in there you might as well replace the valve stem seals and the cam seals. There is an oil orifice in each head. Those little suckers get two O-rings each. If you don't have a shop manual you should get one before attempting the job.
 

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Thank you,

Do you have to pull the valve stems out to replace the seals? I imagine so and if so how diffilcult? and do you need special tools?

cam seals are simple since cam comes out regardless, correct?

are the oil orfice seals simple to replace?

can I purchase these seals separately or do I need to purchasean expensive kit that includes them.

One more thing... what are the chances of the head being cracked over the chances of thegasket being blown... your best estimate , I don't expect to know until I get the head off the bike but all the same whats your guess?
 

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my guess is you need to go ride that bike, there is no way i am aware of that you could get water in the carbs unless you spilled it in there if the bike is running good, but i will try to answer your questions,,,,,,

no you dont hasve to pull the valve stems out but you do have to remove the springs and you will need a spring compressor for that, a little tedious but not too bad
cam seals are simple but if they dont leak why replace them?
the orifice seals are simple, its jut a tube that goes from the block to the head with oring on it
the orifice seals are likely good as long as they are soft and flexible
these head dont normally crack, they do however warp causing a head gasket to leak, have the head surfaced while off at a good machine shop
 

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Thanks Randy... making a late dinner could not reply right away.

No way was water poured into the carbs , the air cover was not off and I did the pouring.

It was after riding and the bike was still warm when I poured the water in the radiator possibly causing the opening where the leak is to be expanded which could have been the reason it went into thecarbs . this is why I thought crack..Today I filled the radiator while the bike was cold and water only came out of the right side exhaust pipe when I turned it over, nothing in the carbs. didn't fire it over tho. just wanted to see where the water was coming from. The water only appeared after turning the bike over not before.

I do appreciate your advice and will take the head down to ridge to have it checked.

I suppose this should go well considering where the heads are located. rebuilt car engines and will admit I did well at it. never touched a bike engine but looks simple enough.I'm just very inqusitive because of my lack in experience at doing anything with bikes.

I'll keep all of you up to date and informed of what happens once I begin and after I finish.

THANKS AGAIN!! ALL OF YOU!!!

GOD BLESS!
 

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unless its a badly warped head i still dont see how water got into the intake, i would think water would also be in the oil.
if you built a car engine you can do this, get a good torque wrench and dont forget the 7th bolt under the head


oh, and get oem head gaskets
 
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