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has anyone tried this on the steering stem bearings?

seems since it works so well on the hub splines, why not?
 

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I have always used real grease on any type of ball, roller, or needle bearings. I would use moly wheel bearing grease on the steering head bearings. The splines are a different thing, they are not bearings. I would not, for instance, use moly paste on wheel bearings.
 

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JerryH wrote:
I have always used real grease on any type of ball, roller, or needle bearings. I would use moly wheel bearing grease on the steering head bearings. The splines are a different thing, they are not bearings. I would not, for instance, use moly paste on wheel bearings.
Moly 60 grease is made for wheel bearings, drive shaft splines or any high pressure, high heat and stress parts. Been using it for years on the steering head bearings also because it is resistive to moisture better than regular GAA (General Automotive Application) grease. According to Honda: "The contents are solid and will not separate at room temp. Recommended for gears, bearings, and other high-pressure/high-temp applications".:smiler:

Gene:action:
 

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Last time I had my speedometor cable out I coated the cable with Honda 60 Moly paste. So far so good.
Tom Bishop
`98 S.E.
 

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"Moly 60 grease is made for wheel bearings, drive shaft splines or any high pressure, high heat and stress parts. Been using it for years on the steering head bearings also because it is resistive to moisture better than regular GAA (General Automotive Application) grease. According to Honda: "The contents are solid and will not separate at room temp. Recommended for gears, bearings, and other high-pressure/high-temp applications"


Grease or paste? I have always used moly grease on wheel bearings, chassis parts, like ball joints,U joints, etc. and motorcycle parts like wheel bearings, swingarm bearings and steering head bearings. I use it on the rear suspension linkage of my dual sport bike. I have never used moly paste (at $6 per oz for Guard Dog 573)on anything but shaft drive splines. Bearings seem to last forever with grease, and if they ever do wear out, they are cheap to replace. Not the case with splines.
 

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Never really thought about it, I've got some GD-570 (not sure about the difference to the 573 product) that I use as a bore grease for some of the fire-arms (about $27 a quart from the manufacturer) ...

the thick paste stuff though is strictly for high-load items (splines etc) as Jerry posts nomal 'bearing' grease for rotating bearings always. I kinda "guide" my thoughts along the lines of High-Moly pastes being used for slip-fit items where clearances will always exist, and 'comon grease' being used where assemblies are pre-loaded (no clearance in the bearings)... Since the molly will add to the bearing surfaces involved, it'd seem to me that preloaded (rolling) bearings woud tighten-up as the moly worked to the surfaces.
 

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GD 573 is similar to Honda Moly 60, only it is 73% moly, rather than 60%. I've been using it on my Vulcan 750 splines for some time, and love it. But it is a paste, not a grease. I get it directly from the Guard Dog site.
 

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Cool -- you may wanna look at the GD-570, sounds pretty much the same (73% MoS2), but about 1/6th the price...
 

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I dont see any reason why you would need to use Moly 60 on steering head bearings at all.

They are a tapered roller bearing exactly the same as the wheel bearings in older cars. Pack them with grease the same way.

Put a golf ball size ball of grease in your left hand, take the bearing in your right hand with the big side facing the grease in your left hand.Push the bearing into the grease with some force until it comes out the small end of the bearing. Keep rotating the bearing in your hand until it is fully greased.
 

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The head bearings are neither in a high stress or high temp application. They move in a max of about a 100 degree ark, and even then only when your are doing slow speed maneuvers or pushing it. It would be OK to use the moly, but seems like a bit of overkill to me. Just my 1.5 cents. (the adjusted rate now that the Canadian dollar is doing better then the US)
 

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Ditto satan ., Moly 60 is a PASTE grease used for extremely high shear loads such as rear end components.
Moly 60 should only be used for the applications descibed on the container .
For normal applications a white grease or standard chasis grease is all that is needed.
 

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Ok, I got the numbers mixed up. GD-570 is what I have, and it is 73% moly paste. And it is $38 plus shipping for 8 oz. GD-525 is also a paste, and is only 30% moly, yet it costs $44 for 8 oz plus shipping. It clearly specifies that neither one is suitable for bearings. There is no 573.

For all bearings I use DuraBlend MolyGraph wheel bearing grease from Autozone. Very cheap, and seems to work very well.
 
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