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I'm anxiously gathering "stuff" to get working with on my bike,when my foot and the weather gets ready so I can work. I got a used rear mastercylinder to rebuild-figuring if the one on mine is too bad to rebuild i'll have a spare.The rear brakes worked when I first looked at the bike -he said he had just had the calipers rebuilt and new pads.He rode it over here and the rear brakes failed on the way-he offered to get them fixed but I said "no problem ". The resivour is full so it must be by passing. Maybe just bleeding would cure it but I want to be sure. Next I was looking for a hone small enough to hone the cyl with-I got lucky I had one small enough in my shop. While reading the manual I noticed it said nothing of honing the cylinder-but said not to try to dissamble the pressure regulator valve on the rear of the cylinder. Interesting! If I hone it I may get contamination in the valve. I don't like the idea of not honing the cylinder!! What have you guys done?

To Hone or not to hone???
 

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I wouldn't hone it at all as the metal is very soft. Maybe just a light cleanup with 1200 grade wet & dry at the most and even then only if there are marks or corrosion that need rubbing out.
 

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Hi Bill

I wouldn't hone it just to hone it. Maybe if you were trying to get rid of a scratch or something, otherwise as mentioned just clean it up with very fine wet sand paper. thats how I would go.

Good Luck Tom
 

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Most of it is dried and varnished gunk that will cleanup nicely with spray brake cleaner. I personally try to never sand material off of very precise pieces. the tolerances are very small and I think may be very well met and exceeded by, sanding, honing etc. If there is some gunk you cannot get out with the cleaner, i suggest foil and if severe 0000 fine steel wool, but make sure to rinse thouroughly with cleaner and then flush with brake fluid.
 

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The mater cylinder piston has a rubber seal that rides on the cylinder walls so a little pitting won't hurt anything. Just clean up the cylinder to remove any lumps of corrosion which can be done with fine Wet/Dry sand paper on a dowel and call it good. I've overhauled a couple of old 'Wing master cylinders that looked pretty bad, they were filled with hardened crud and gunk and had some pitting but once cleaned up a bit with a new set of rubber parts they worked like new. No leaking and strong brakes.
 

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When I wrenched on construction equipment a few years ago, I would use a metal dowel that I split the first two inches. I would load it with fine wet/dry sand paper and run it in a small pneumatic drill. It works great as long as you stop frequently to check your progress.:cool: Like everyone else has said earlier, use chemicals first, then go to abrasion.
 
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