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I'm not new to motorcycles by any means. I had a Bultaco 100 as a kid and worked my way up to my CB 750 and Norton 750 Commando. Even rode my fathers 1000 cc 76 Wing for a summer. Generally, they all rode and felt the samethe same, this 19831100 Interstateis different. I'mjust wondering if it's the norm.

When cornering and cutting a curve in the rode I have to use more arm to work the handlebar, in fact it seems the front wants to cut the curve more than I do and have to pull back a bit against it. Now I realize the angleof my arms and wrists are are different due to the angle of the grips.

Also 5th gear, the OD. It seems like a real overdrive, not what passes for one in cars now, but a real overdrive (you older members know what I'm talking about), that you don't use until AFTER you've hit your cruising speed, and dosen't do well against a strong headwind or a steep uphill climb.

Lastly, along with the engine, there's a light whine as well, as I've never had a shaft driven bike before, I'm assuming that may be it.

So basically, I'm looking to find out what differences I can expect to find.
 

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Correct on the OD. I don't use it until I get to 60+ mph or so. That's the case on the '83, not the prior years though.

The light whine is just being a Goldwing opposed 4 cylinder engine. It's not the shaft drive, it's the engine. Primarily the chains inside, etc.. My KZ1100 had a whine too, inherent in the engine design.

You'll get used to the curves. Try different things like pulling back on one side while pushing on the other grip.
 

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I learned a long time ago to use the push/pull method for running curves with just about any bike over a 750. That and a good set of tires allows my 82 1100 to just whip throught the curves and she just kinda falls right over into the groove of the curve. I use it for quick lane changes too. People don't know what to think when I whip over in front of them after passing them, I do it so quick.
 

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Concerning the 'falling in' during a turn, check your front tire pressure. Sounds as if it is low, You'll want at least 36PSI up front and checkthe torque of your steering head bearings. Not sure what they should be torqued to, but I'm sure you'll find the values in the manual.

The whine is engine design, including the timing belts. Nature of the beast.


Dusty
 

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My '83 1100A OD does not pull aggressively into hills or other loads until I get to 4K. I really don't use it in the Texas hill country unless I am on fairly level turf then shift with moderate throttle as I approach 3K in 4th. If I am under 3K on a steep grade it will loose RPM in OD. This is not to say that my carbs are perfect.

I have found that tires can make a big difference. I haven't tried a lot of them but I can say the Metzelar 880s that I runare a very quick tire and will "fall" into curves whereas the DunlopElitesI have run tend to track straight and have to be driven in to curves. I actually have to pay more attention to the Metzelars because they are more sensitive to handlebar input Again, IMHO, it seems to be a tread and pressure function. dj
 

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Tire pressure and fork pressure; I notice that if either one gets low my low speed turning is more difficult.

I really notice the OD bogging down against the wind and uphill. Think I need a carb balance though.

Chuck
 

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Personally, I like a bike that falls into a turn and that you can make adjustments while in the turn. Also, I don't find that I need to do much counter-steering to get the GL1100 where it needs to go. Then again, I tend to use more body steering as opposed to steering inputs to the handlebar.
 

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The CB 750, Norton 750 Commando and father's 76 Wing all rode and felt the same? I've owned all three of those bikes and can only say I feel each rides very different. As far as cornering the (basic) CB was an infamous under steer while the Commando was just opposite as an over steer. Leaving the 76 pretty much neutral and fully dependent on rider input in the corners.

Like many have already mentioned, tires and tire pressures along with head & wheel bearings, suspension components (even swing arm pivot components), handle bars and any added weight can all affect ride and corning quality. Plus making sure your almost 26-year-old bike is in tiptop condition helps.

Don't forget to consider road conditions and banking

Want to feeldifferent rides? Try the 1200 and the 1500 and the 1800
 

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Morram,

Agreed, there were differences to each, what I was refering to was the steering, more of a sport bike ride that they all had in common. That is what I had always been used to. I've also noticed that the engine in the 1100 sits lower (and of course heavier) changing the center of gravity, I'm sure that plays a lot into the change of handling.
 

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Richardrwg,
For me maybe all the above were mere motorcyclish since my earlier experience in sports were jacked 50s and 125cc machines and lately the CBRs and Ducati. Yes, all the Wings have the low slung engine with what also makes for that LCG is the even lower trans both enriching the touring ride effect.
 

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The consideration of the low center of gravity on the GW is definitely in order. My '79 CBX was two different motorcycles when the gas tank was full or empty. The CBX also had very little rake or trail and those dynamics are probably more influential than what I mentioned early. Throw about 50 pounds of gas on top of it and it was lively to say the least, not to mention 6 cylinders of motor hanging out there. I think probably rake and trail are the big dogs here and the rest are just modifiers. dj
 

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Yup. Keep the tire pressure up (>36psi) and that will help alot. You will get the "feel" for what the Wing will do as the miles pile up; same with the OD - your Wing will let you know if you need to notch down a gear. My '85 Aspy is happiest when I keep it above 2,800 rpms.
 

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GoldWingPastor wrote:
. . . . My '85 Aspy is happiest when I keep it above 2,800 rpms. . . . .
'Zactly. I think a lot of that "whine" is the longish timing belts on the pre-1800 'Wings. The later, chain-driven-cam motors sound different.

Whine= good. When the whine stops, so do you. Keep the belts happy. :)
 

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That's for sure, around the subs I hardly ever get my 85 out of 2d until I hit the blvds. And on the freeway it's usually 4th gear since 5th often requires downshifting in traffic
 

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The starter came in today and I took if for a ride, before going out I checked the air pressure and it had 24 lbs. I pumped it up to 365 and the handling was totally different.

Thanks
 

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Richardrwg wrote:
The starter came in today and I took if for a ride, before going out I checked the air pressure and it had 24 lbs. I pumped it up to 365 and the handling was totally different.

Thanks

365? and the tire didn't blow?:shock::shock::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1::cheeky1:
 

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OK, so I might have hit one more numerical key than I intended.:doh:
 
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