Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Being a very conservative rider I do not lean much; however, I also have no idea how far I actually do lean. So, how can I measure my lean angle? I thought of some type of an inclinometer - but the physics of how they work may prevent that (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=539596). Another site suggested an iPhone coupled with TiltmeterPro application (http://www.zx-10r.net/forum/showthread.php?s=b5409d40d618992ca58aa3649d5e63fb&t=77157&page=2). This issue is far more complicated than I had originally thought it would be. Any suggestions on how 'lean angle' could be measured? Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
239 Posts
imported post

I usually lean as far as I can without falling over. LOL Honestly, don't know how to measure that but what you can do is look at the videos on You Tube and see how far some of them look like they're leaning. May not be a measurement but should give you some idea.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,303 Posts
imported post

Above 10 mph you should lean more than the bike does, then when you hear the metal parts scraping you know you are leaning far enough.

Below 10mph counter lean and push the bike over, same thing applies to the scraping hard parts though.

If you never hear the hard parts touch then you are not leaning over all the way.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,377 Posts
imported post

Yours is a good question. Even a conservative rider needs to know how far he can push things in an emergency.

I'm not sure if this applies to you but overly cautious riders have gone off the road on curves they could have handled with the appropriate lean.

Riding with a mentor who takes you slowly up the learning curve is one option. A turn and bank indicator is another option but comes with a problem. You have to take your eyes off the road to use it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,148 Posts
imported post

the problem with a bubble level or other gravity operated lean angle type device, is that gravity is counter-acted by centrifugal force in the turn. This is the physics involved in turning a two-wheeled vehicle. The two forces are equal and opposite. So your lean indicator would indicate zero.



You might try to mount a camera on the bike and take a video of your lean, and then measure the resultant angle on the computer screen.



But that's the only idea I can come up with.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
551 Posts
imported post

Years ago, I'd scrape the floorboards and right the bike in panic. Now, if I don't scrape the pegs in the turns, I'm very disappointed. Lean it until you can hear it. Trust me, you'll grow to like that sound. Otherwise, there are a few clinometers on the market that should accurately measure the lean angle.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,287 Posts
imported post

A simple way to get some measure is to do this:

You'll need:

A small plastic protractor
Some lightweight fishing line
A fishing weight (sinker type, 'bout one ounce)
A black permanent marker (Sharpie works)
A length of wood dowel to span handlebars
Duct tape
Razor blade

Bike on center stand and level.

Cut the dowel so it will span your handlebars with the ends running about an inch over on each side in a spot that leaves the dowel sitting level. each bike is different. Tape the dowel in place.

Find the center of the dowel and mark it with the marker. Center the protractor to the mark with the straight, flat side against the dowel and tape just the ends to the dowel. So far, everything is temporarily in place.

Use the razor blade and cut open the marker. Inside will be the felt material used to flow the markers fluid. Careful, it's messy. Cut a small section appx 1" long and about 1/16" wide from it. This is your new wiper.

Take a length of fishing line and tie a knot to one end of the wiper, wrapping about 3/4" of the remainder a few times and tie another knot at the other end. You should be able to hold the line taught with the wiper in-line with the fishing line. Tie the weight about two inches down from the wiper.

The protractor has a embossed side with raised marks of graduation. Don't use this side, use the smooth side to face you as you sit on the bike. Flip it over if need be. From the center mark, position the wiper at the bottom edge of the arc so that it stays in the middle and tape the fishing line in place. A couple of wraps of the line around the dowel and protracror is a good idea before taping it down.

Now, don't move this thing around too much. Once it's in position it will mark the protractor before you start riding.

Finally, adjust the dowel so that the protracter has about 5 degrees forward (or positive)tilt, giving the bottom about 5 degrees negative (or rearward) tilt and supplying just a bit of constatnt force for the wiper to stay on the plastic. Maybe more depending on your riding style.

Go ride. When done, transfer your off-center marks into degrees of tilt for the ride you just took.

Feel free to improvise the above. Some people (ie: cheap-a$$ed racers) get pretty fancy with the basic above idea. If you plan on doing some testing, use clear celophane tape on the protractor, it'll become reusable and you put the marked tape into a logbook with notation, ...or whatever...

In a cage, some measure of g-force can be calculated using the same set-up with more accuracy than one might expect. Construction technique is key with this idea.
 

·
Junior Grue
Joined
·
8,153 Posts
imported post

As Wolfman said, with any inclinometer bubble or pendulum if it doesn't show you as being upright in a curve on a bike you've fallen down.:shock:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,224 Posts
imported post

Your tires will show you how far your leaning the bike by a wear width. You could, with the help of friends, is lean the bike over in the driveway till your at the edge of your tire wear and measure the angle your bike is at.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,381 Posts
imported post

Dimond100 wrote:
Being a very conservative rider I do not lean much; however, I also have no idea how far I actually do lean. So, how can I measure my lean angle? I thought of some type of an inclinometer - but the physics of how they work may prevent that (http://www.advrider.com/forums/showthread.php?t=539596). Another site suggested an iPhone coupled with TiltmeterPro application (http://www.zx-10r.net/forum/showthread.php?s=b5409d40d618992ca58aa3649d5e63fb&t=77157&page=2). This issue is far more complicated than I had originally thought it would be. Any suggestions on how 'lean angle' could be measured? Thanks.

Without looking at or reading anything else on it, personally, I don't think I would want to know nor would I concern myself with it simply because I have enough to do watching the traffic and keeping me and the bike safe. Knowing what the angle I am at would just be an unneeded piece of information for me to concern myself with. I'm already looking at the dash too much now keeping an eye on the revs and the speed and the gas and all the other pertinent information. That’s just me though. Two pennies.




 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,132 Posts
imported post

Check your chicken strip after your ride.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
423 Posts
imported post

Chalk your front tire in a few sections, then go ride. That will tell you how much you are leaning. A conservative rider will wear out the center of his tires...an agressive rider will wear the whole tire. Thats what i did on mine when i first got it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
427 Posts
imported post

One racing school taught me to look at the wear on the front tire for leaning; although on a race bike, the knee is used as a gauge. The rear tire tends to change shape as the bike leans. Keep this in mind. Race bikes tend to have round tires and cruisers tend to have flat tires with square corners because of the way they are ridden and therefore not as much tire contact as a race bike. Here is a little extra info you may not want. It is kind of hard to do on a Gold Wing, but getting off the side of the seat a little helps to allow the bike to come back upright.

If the question is related to emergencies, I would always try to lean the bike to a avoid a crash verses running off the road. On the track, I would rather low slide verses running off the track.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
imported post

Dang I wish it was summer here. Id like to tape a string on the back side on my windshield and hang a wieght on it to see what it would do in corners.
Would be fun to be able to test lean angle. Just for giggles alltho it would be a little humbling to us wing riders to be scrapping our pegs at very little lean angle compared to sport bikes. On the other hand we probly look petty good compared to most crusers. It seems I can't turn any cornner on a cruser bike and not grind on something!!!
Wilf
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
imported post

Dang

Well seeing I double posted may as well use the post.

As far a saftey goes I see no way knowing your lean angle would help you out.

as others have said your pegs will scrape long before you run out of lean angle.

In a emergancy you need to operate on learned muscle control. Trying to use a number in that situation would be detramental. Just go out and practice leanning as far as you can and then lean somemore. You cannot over lean on a goldwing.

You may want to get a capable coach to help you out on this as you can turn a big lean angle into a nasty high side if you make some technical errors. Been there done that but requires some pretty agressive drving for that to happen

And you say you are conserative rider. Would you ride you bike without bike insurance and life insurance. I think not. Well consider this practice the same as insurance because when your time comes if youve practiced your muscle's will be called upon to save your life and if you spend one second thinking about what to do you lose!!!

Wilf
 

·
Anti-Guru
Joined
·
2,711 Posts
imported post

A video camera placed on a tripod at your "favorite corner" would capture an image for you... or, if unlike me you have friends, station one of them well before the apex of your favorite corner to snap a few photos/vids of your back end that you can measure later.

Alternately, find the first-touch scrape points on your bike, then attach small blocks of wood so that you can go grind em off in the twisties and have a look that way (angle can be extrapolated using the wear on the wood locks, or by using a flat plane (I use a steel plate) kinda wedged at the tire's roll point and lifted to touch your scrape work.)

I have troubles with the acorn-nuts holding the rubber onto the highway boards of my '88... go through one or two sets of the lower ones each year (the foot psges fold nicely, and seem to wear less) ;)

If you're up here sometime, lemme know - there's an HD camera on the bike so I could chase ya and rcord some videos for measurement)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,303 Posts
imported post

Find a nice big empty parking lot and start practicing corners at around 20mph in second gear, maybe third after a while. You should be on the inside edge of your seat leaning off the bike to the inside, head and eyes up, looking across/through the corner, then gradually push the bike harder and harder as the speed comes up a little at a time until you hear that magic sound of metal scraping. This is when you realize that you have just come to your limit, and that limit is far beyond where you think it is right now.

On camp Pendleton a year or two ago, Lee Parks (Sport bike guru) actually got his knee down on a borrowed Goldwing, 'just to show that it can be done'.

A bubble level or pendulum will do you no good at all if you are moving, it will only work if the bike is stationary and pushed over.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top