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How can you read the date on your tires? I checked my Rear Tire, and it has some small cracks in the sidewall. I am lucky I made it to the Calhoun Rally and back.I parked it, and I have a new tire mounted on another wheel , but the wheel dosen't look as good as the one I currently have on it, but I will have to run the old wheel with the new tire on it for a while. I am running the old Dunlop 491 Series, Less than 2 years old, and it has a 6 year warranty on it. My Wing is a 1980 GL1100.

Also, On the tire, It says "Tubeless, running on a tubed rim". Does that mean It can take a tube? I don't believe you can safely run a tubeless tire with a tube. Is this correct?

Thanks,

Nightrider1
 

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How old are the tires on your vehicle? The date of manufacture is indicated by the last group of digits in the DOT manufacture code on the sidewall of the tire. The number is often stamped in a recessed rectangle. The DOT code tells who manufactured the tire, where it was made and when. The last group of digits in the code is the date code that tells when the tire was made.
Before 2000, the date code had three digits. Since 2000, it has had four. The first two digits are the week of the year (01 = the first week of January). The third digit (for tires made before 2000) is the year (1 = 1991). For most tires made after 2000, the third and fourth digits are the year (04 = 2004).
I
The date of manufacture is essential information for car owners and tire buyers because tires deteriorate even if they are not used. European automobile manufacturers recommend replacing ANY tire that is more than six (6) years old, including the spare tire. No such recommendations have yet been made by domestic vehicle manufacturers.
 

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At the end of a string of numbers, and usually placed within a small oval, is stamped the date of manufacture. eg, mine reads 4604--meaning the 46th week of 04. It is normally only on one side of the tire.

A tubless tire will not seal properly on a non tubeless rim, so therefore must have a tube. However, putting a tube inside a tubless tire on a tubless rim will be OK too. That being said, if you need to do that, there is something askew, and should be rectified.
 

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Ok. I appreiciate the input!
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Nightrider1
 

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Just curious, but the pic shows a 2002 tire and Hawker22 says he has a 2004 tire. Am I crazy or does that seem old for a tire? 4 to 6 years sitting in some warehouse somewhere? Any wisdom on this would be appreciated. How long can a tire last in storage under the right conditions? And how would you know?

thanks in advance.
 

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NomadicWing wrote:
Just curious, but the pic shows a 2002 tire and Hawker22 says he has a 2004 tire. Am I crazy or does that seem old for a tire? 4 to 6 years sitting in some warehouse somewhere? Any wisdom on this would be appreciated. How long can a tire last in storage under the right conditions? And how would you know?

thanks in advance.
The post with the 2002 tire, and Hawker having a 2004 tire are two totally separate posts by two different people.

Tires will last longer under the right storage conditions of course. In dark storage, and the right temp and humidity. There are plenty of articles on the web about tire storage and life, but I've gotta run out the door and get back to work!
 
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