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So, this Saturday I go to pick up a 1994 GL1500 SE, very nice bike. I want to ride it home, but it is about 3 hours away and I have to go that way to pick up some other things in my truck. So, I have to put the bike on a trailer and bring it home.

What is the best way to tie one down so it is secure and does not damage anything?
I brought another 1500 home on a trailer, but it is a running riding eye sore and so I didn't really care how I tied it down, as I could not damage it, all the plastics were cracked and faded anyway.

BTW, a search returned no results, or I did it wrong.
 

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Attach two straps up under the front of the fairing to the frame. Use soft ties at the frame. Slightly collapse the front forks.

Attach two straps to the passenger grab handles (or remove the side panels and use the frame for the back).

Protect the paint if needed with soft towels etc.

These four straps should hold it quite well.

Others may have better offers....this has worked for us.

Or just tow it home with a Super Bird.....Ha...Ha.....
 

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U-haul has a very nice Motorcycle trailer, used one to bring home my GF's '83 Virago a few yrs ago (bought it non-running) and the trailer looks like a Goldwing would fit.......
 

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U-haul has a very nice Motorcycle trailer, used one to bring home my GF's '83 Virago a few yrs ago (bought it non-running) and the trailer looks like a Goldwing would fit.......
If you're renting, this is the way to go. Low entry, wheel chocks, tie downs and handles a Goldwing just fine.
 

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I hauled bike about 400 miles in a normal trailer. Strapped down from the crash bars, pulling four different ways. Had no issues other than re-tightening a couple times in the first 50 miles, or so.

I'd guess, if you do I-5 and then I-90 it will be a breeze.

I take it you've considered taking a helper to drive the truck back for you?

Oh, and I rented a U-Haul M/C trailer to haul the '85 home and it fit easily.
 

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I don't like to tie to the grab handles, seen them come loose when the bolt breaks.....


use a Single Strap and wrap it once around the rear wheel.
Tie it off to both sides of the trailer.


that is the only way I will trailer a bike.




 

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I've had each of my 4 wings on a trailer either to bring them home or to take for repairs. What I do is bring the bike forward against the front frame rail so the bike can't roll forward, take a piece of cardboard or a heavy towel and lay across the the driver seat. Then take the ratchet straps and hook onto the top of the rear crash bar and cross over the seat to the opposite side, I do both sides like this then tie the front wheel to the front rail of the trailer. Never had one come loose.

My trailer is a 16' car hauler

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I hauled bike about 400 miles in a normal trailer. Strapped down from the crash bars, pulling four different ways. Had no issues other than re-tightening a couple times in the first 50 miles, or so.

I'd guess, if you do I-5 and then I-90 it will be a breeze.

I take it you've considered taking a helper to drive the truck back for you?

Oh, and I rented a U-Haul M/C trailer to haul the '85 home and it fit easily.

I am going with my wife, but my truck is a 1 ton Dually 4x4 Service truck, and she does not feel comfortable driving it.
 

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I've tied my 1500 down on the deck of two different car ferries and once on a trailer. I tie the front down like most people suggest, but I loop soft straps around the passenger footrests and use ratchet straps from there. The footrests attach directly to the frame with a couple of pretty substantial bolts.
 

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Here is a photo of how I tied down my 1500. The 1800 is done the same way.

Please do not use engine guards, rear tip over bars, hand grab bars, straps over seats or on the side stand. These attachment points and bolts are not designed go take the forces that can be generated when towing. At least on the 1800, there are many posts on the GL1800 forum where people use the crash bars for tie down points and then find the mounting bolts are broken. The moving company that transported my bike from PA to CA use the rear crash bars as tie down points. When I put on my trailer hitch, sure enough, one of the bolts on each side where the strap was were broken.


The info that DBohrer is great! It will depend on how many tie down points and location on your trailer on how you tie it down. Using soft straps with ratchet straps on the lower triple clamp is a must. This pulls the bike to the front of the trailer. I prefer the frame as my backup to pull the bike forward. This also helps with the bike moving from side to side. Without a wheel chock, I would also put straps from the frame directly to the side of the trailer. The bike will want to tip over without the chock. This will stop this side to side movement. The rear tire point is good. This is keeping the rear of the bike from wanting to wag side to side on bumps. I had already removed the tire strap when I took the picture of the 1500.

I have been towing things on trailers for over 40 years. I have found that ratchet straps are the best. When you stop, check your straps, they will loosen up as the load finds it's spot on the trailer. With the ratchet straps, you just give them another click or two and things are tight again.
 

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As a safety feature passenger grab rails are way over built with steel and hardened attaching bolts and are adequate for your tie down point.


Some guys cross thread the bolt holes and in those cases tie to frame.
 

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I noticed that you also tie the front wheel to the vertical upright....

I don't see many people doing that, they just say "oh the fork tie down straps will hold it in place."


I have two vertical uprights on my trailer, the wheel slides in between them.
no wheel chock, trailer is too short.


umm, yes, but, I once had a tie down strap come loose, or it frayed out, or something.....
years ago, I now use only 1,000 lb rated tie down straps or better.

















 

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I am absolutely against tying down the rear suspension in any way. Use the saddlebag guards to tie it to the sides of the trailer but let the rear suspension float, it will ride much better. It will stay upright with tie downs over the lower triple tree at about a 45 degree angle, make sure the bike is vertical. And be sure to put the side stand up.

When I brought my GL1000 home I rolled it up in the truck and used a tie down on each side at the front, got out and closed the tail gate. A young man there said he had some more tie downs I could have, I said it has 2, what more do I need. Hauled it 175 miles on crooked roads and it never moved.
 
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