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Well I almost messed up. Suppose I should ask is it the handlbar switches you are talking about or the other ones. Kit
 

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The button you push in to engage the reverse & also the one above it for the cruise control.
 

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blackbassja wrote:
The button you push in to engage the reverse & also the one above it for the cruise control.
No no easy way to deal with them . I have found that the factory supplied grease in them gets a bit tacky and will not allow the slider in the internal switch to work properly. They can be taken apart and cleaned and a good dielectric silicone grease put in sparingly and they work fine. A tedious job but can be done easy enough.

My reverse switch stuck the very first time I ever used it, the bike was made in June of 2007 and I bought it in Sept? Just sitting that long the grease had gotten to the point it caused the slider to stick. I tried a dowel wrapped with leather and a rubber mallet to jar it loose, nope. As the switch cannot be purchased by itself and you have to buy the whole thing, I opted to take the time to take it all apart. Fixing a stuck reverse switch Photo Gallery by fred harmon at pbase.com

If the bike is under warranty , the shop will just put on a new assembly, if not I think the assembly is like 130 to 150 dollars? Something like that.

Kit
 

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On that side you will need a manual to follow. It all depends on how the bike is equipped also, if it has heated grips and so on. But basically you remove the grip, the brake master cylinder and get that out of the way, then you will have to release the throttle cables so they can be removed, then under the main switch are two screws, remove them and you can then separate the two halves of the control switches.

Once inside you will see the switches held in place by tabs and small phillips head screws, each has fine wires to it also and care must be taken to properly route the little wires back into place upon re-assembly. The little wires like to jump up out of the grooves in the housing and not stay back into place so I just use a bit more of the silicone grease to convince them to stay put, long enough to get it positioned back unto the bar.

Not a hard job just takes at least half a day and some good bi-focals and a good strong light to see all that stuff with.

If you decide to replace the entire unit, you do all this plus, take the front fairing off as you have to access the pin plugs up under the front right fairing as the wire harness runs to that point.

Kit

Kit
 

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I'm not in any way disagreeing with Kit here, that's good advice. However, I would like to share some other advice I got and tried on my own bike, an 06.

I bought the bike in October, right at the end of the season, brand new for a good price.

I experienced some sticking of the reverse button almost immediately. The weather was cold 35 - 40F, and the tech said that this was the problem. he recommended that I use a hair dryer to warm the switch block and then exercise the switches fairly vigorously.

It worked and I have had no trouble since. Looking at Kit's explanation and thinking about it, I imagine that the grease softened up and moved out of the way somewhat, so there was only a smear where things had to move, that's the theory anyway:cheeky1:

It's worth a try before tackling those switches!!!!!!

I was cautioned NOT to use a heat gun because of the risk of damaging the switch.

Edit: It occurs to me that if the problem is old dried up grease this probably wouldn't work.
 

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English Bob wrote:
I'm not in any way disagreeing with Kit here, that's good advice. However, I would like to share some other advice I got and tried on my own bike, an 06.

I bought the bike in October, right at the end of the season, brand new for a good price.

I experienced some sticking of the reverse button almost immediately. The weather was cold 35 - 40F, and the tech said that this was the problem. he recommended that I use a hair dryer to warm the switch block and then exercise the switches fairly vigorously.

It worked and I have had no trouble since. Looking at Kit's explanation and thinking about it, I imagine that the grease softened up and moved out of the way somewhat, so there was only a smear where things had to move, that's the theory anyway:cheeky1:

It's worth a try before tackling those switches!!!!!!

I was cautioned NOT to use a heat gun because of the risk of damaging the switch.

Edit: It occurs to me that if the problem is old dried up grease this probably wouldn't work.
I fully intend to try that with the next switch situation. Someone in our club will have one stick soon, and I do plan to try that. It is called common sense when doing something like that, sure if you hold the heat gun up there and melt something!!

But gentle heat for a longer period of time, slowly heat the whole assembly up and give the heat enough time to transfer into the inner switch, should soften the grease and while soft if you work the switch and exercise it should be fine. Might take 30 minutes to carefully heat the whole assembly up, but sure worth a try and I fully intend to try that on the next one.
No grease would be better than the tacky kind in there, but if you could get it soft and smear it around a bit, might just do the trick.
Kit
 

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I don't recall how long it took, but it was a while. Less than stripping it down that's for sure.

Mind you, if it hadn't worked it would have gone back to the dealer with only 200km on the clock!
 
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