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saw this today on Facebook
After having major back surgery, I am thinking about getting a sidecar for my 94 Gold Wing. I was just wondering if some of you have a side car and what it is like to ride and steer??


Answer: I had a sidecar on my Harley for 4 years. It made great memories because my boys were 2 and 6 at the time. We rode all over. But.... you asked how it rode. Imagine plowing a field on a tractor with a flat tire.
 

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Well yea but he was on a Harley, what did he expect it to feel like?

:):)
 

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I rode one with a sidecar once, kind of like a unicycle with 3 wheels. :surprise:
 

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We owned a Ural sidecar rig for about 6 years before moving up to our GL1500SE sidecar 3 years ago - that's 9 years experience with sidecars. They definitely take some time to get used to - the biggest factor is the physics: when you roll on the throttle it wants to turn to the right; when you roll off the throttle, or hit the brakes it wants to turn left. The Goldwing, being heavier than th Ural, does not exhibit this as strongly as the Ural, but you still have to be aware of it, and you can actually use this to help you navigate through the twisties. This steering issue is caused by the asymmetric layout: the drive tire is on one side rather than in the middle so it applies force to the road off to the side of the center of mass. Same with braking: the force is off-center.



Because you're steering with the handlebars it takes more upper body strength than a 2-wheeler. When I first got our Ural my shoulders and upper back would complain for days after a ride - once I learned to relax that issue went away.


My wife absolutely loves the sidecar: with her artificial knees, bad back, and deteriorating hips she could not be comfortable on the back of the bike. In the sidecar she can move around as much as she needs, take a nap if she feels so inclined, and most of all she has an unobstructed view to the front! If not for the sidecar we would not be riding!
 

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Years ago, Frank and I were working on a friend's GL1000 with a sidecar. That was the first, and last, time I drove and rode in such a rig.

It felt like that extra wheel kept trying to steer me in the wrong direction. And riding in the car felt like my head was at pickup truck bumper level.
 

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Find someone who has been doing it for a while with a properly set up rig. If it pulls right or left, it's not setup right. If it lifts off the ground on a right hand turn, it's either too light for the bike or it's not setup right. If it's hard to steer, it's not set up right. I still own the 96 Aspencade/California rig I put together in 1999. I also own a 94 SE on two wheels. It's kind of an orphan though, as it spends it's life in the corner of the garage. I much prefer riding with the sidecar. I tend to be an aggressive rider and find I can corner at speeds that would cause my two wheeled bikes to slide. I've owned trikes and hated them. Almost to the point of quitting riding altogether. Fortunately, I came to my senses. Been riding since about 1965 and sidecars since 1980 or so.
 

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Yeah, sidecars are their own animal. I took one for a short ride on a training track recently. Not my cup of tea.

I watched a trainee perform a panic braking exercise between two rows of cones. (To simulate a single lane).

The sidecar shot through the left row of cones, which would have been into oncoming traffic.

Definitely not something to jump on and go. Could have bad consequences.
 

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A sidecar rig is definitely a different animal. I don't have many miles on mine yet so I can't offer an educated opinion. I definitely like it so far.
I also had back surgery and bought the Hack in anticipation of not being able to hold my Valkyrie up at a light. That fear has gone away but I will be keeping the sidecar rig.
 

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Before you choose a trike, take one for an extended test ride. I had the chance to ride a new Harley Triglide about 60 miles. I needed help getting off of it, my back hurt so much.

On a related note, yesterday I helped a friend assemble his first sidecar rig, after selling their trike. A 2019 Indian with a DMC sidecar. He and his wife took it for a 75 mile ride immediately after I got home. They love it.


 

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Yeah, sidecars are their own animal. I took one for a short ride on a training track recently. Not my cup of tea.

I watched a trainee perform a panic braking exercise between two rows of cones. (To simulate a single lane).

The sidecar shot through the left row of cones, which would have been into oncoming traffic.

Definitely not something to jump on and go. Could have bad consequences.
I guess they don't all have a brake on the sidecar wheel to prevent that?
 

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See the United Sidecar Association website to get practical information. One ride on a sidecar will not work. You need practice and learn. Set up is important to run properly and the bike needs to be modified. See: www.sidecar.com
Doug
 

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I guess they don't all have a brake on the sidecar wheel to prevent that?
Not all of them. Personally, I'd have the extra brake. But, my wife doesn't want a sidecar rig anyway, so I'll never have to sort it out. She enjoys the trike.
 

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I have just riden my sidecar across Australia from Perth to Melbourne and then boat to Tasmania. 2,500 miles.
Previous to that I had only done rides of about an hour so. I loved it and no sore muscles.
Often I could actually take my hands off the handlebars but it never required much more than a hand resting on the handle bars. As sidecarmike said it is all about having them set up correctly. I did the trip to Tasmanian but my wife will be doing the return trip with me. On the way over I just filled a lot of old plastic bottles with water and put them in the sidecar to give some balance.
Riding a sidecar requires you to develop a new mind set that says I am on a sidecar (not a bike or in a car). I did a training course with Australian Ural importer who said and I fully agree with that you need at least 10 hours (if not more) on one to develop that new mind set.
PS my wife loves the sidecar, sits in there with her Ipad and hand bag at her feet.
 

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My sidecar. It is an 88 GL1500 and was imported to Australia from Japan. If anybody has any idea of its origin I would love to hear from you.
Nice rig , BUT the sidecar is mounted on the wrong side on the bike:surprise:
I dont remember to have seen an sidecar exactly like yours but the front end on your bike looks "English" ?
 

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I have a Sidecar on order. Looking for a 1993 1500 pics of bike side mounts. Just getting back into biking again and would feel safer with a hack on the side.
 

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Sidecars

Before you choose a trike, take one for an extended test ride. I had the chance to ride a new Harley Triglide about 60 miles. I needed help getting off of it, my back hurt so much.

On a related note, yesterday I helped a friend assemble his first sidecar rig, after selling their trike. A 2019 Indian with a DMC sidecar. He and his wife took it for a 75 mile ride immediately after I got home. They love it.


I misspoke. The gentleman in the black shirt owned the trike. After riding his brother's Indian rig, he has sold it and has ordered a sidecar.
 
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