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what is the best way in your guys' opinion to treat rust, even if only minimal in my tank? this is my first bike (84 gl1200 67k miles), and i noticed some tiny spots.

Thanks,



Anthony
 

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I have seen a couple of posts about different kits for this but can't remember what they are called. Someone who has had to do it will have an answer for you.

In the interim you could do a search of the archives or on google. I'm sure there are a few options out there!

Bob :11grey:
 

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If they are tiny spots I wouldn't worry about them, keep the tank full as much as possible to keep the air away from those areas. There are chemical products like Naval Jelly that convert the rust to a different harder form, but to treat the tank properly generally requires the tank to be removed from the bike. The little rust spots you mention are caused by the tank being empty and exposed to water vapor in the air. They shouldn't cause any trouble being that small and any tiny particles that might break loose will be caught by the filter. If you leave your bike parked for a long period of time such as over a winter, fill the tank and put in some fuel stabilizer to prevent evaporation or varnish depositing.
 

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Hey Anthony:waving:If the tank need serious work this place can do it. The PO of my bike had them completely redo my tank. I think it ran about $80-100.

http://www.leakersgastanks.com/



:12red::cool:
 

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tomorrowneverwas wrote:
what is the best way in your guys' opinion to treat rust, even if only minimal in my tank? this is my first bike (84 gl1200 67k miles), and i noticed some tiny spots.
Anthony, the best way to do it yourselfis to pull the tank out (a real pain),, then flush it with MEK (methyl ethel ketone) to remove all the old fuel residue & varnish,, then rinse real good with VERYHOT water (a power washer helps here),, then add about6 oz of a phosphoric acid based rust killer like "Metal Prep",, then slosh the metal prep around to ALL the corners & seams (that kills the rust in the metal pores & converts free rust zinc oxide,, then pour the remaining metal prep out,,then dry out REAL GOOD (a day or so in the hot sun),, then pour in about 10-15 oz of "REDKOTE" (that'sa tank coating that covers all the rust areas & seals any soft spots),, Then slosh thatRed Kotearound by rolling the tank in all directions (basically fully coat the entire inside of the tank),, that RedKote covers the inside of the tank with a fuel proof coating that resists most anything that is poured in (except MEK).. If done correctly that tank will be good for life & never cause you any problems.

If you just leave the existing tankrust exposed it will haunt you for the rest of the time you own that bike by plugging filters, plugging those ultra fine carb inlet screens, possibly even start leaking in the future as alcohol in the fuel starts allowing held moisture to inflame those rust areas.

I have done numerous small fuel tanks on old equipment, old motorcycles, & antique automobiles & using the above method have never had a leaker or rust plugging problem. I have personally used many tank coating products over the years & some are prone to come loose in large sheets or thin strands & plug the tank outlet or filter screens but I have have very good luck with that "Red Kote"..

Twisty
 

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I have had same results with Red Kote but unless you have significant rust and can actually see evidence in the fuel filter I would leave it alone, as suggested earlier. Keep it near full and use the right amount of stabil for storage periods more than a month or so. I don't know about the new wings (1800) but I always thought this tank was a great candidate for a plastic blow molded part - lighter and no rust.

Bob
 

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Greetings Bob from the Great Lakes State!

I'm in agreement with you on the plastic tank idea.:clapper:

My 77 has been chemically treated several years ago by the PO and looking into the tank with a flashlight, I can see small specks of rust :X

I may try some of that Red Kote stuff...:p
 
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