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'90 1500; '00 1500
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Discussion Starter #1
I understand the rear brake actuates both the rear caliper as well as a front caliper at a 70 rear : 30 front ratio. I'm having trouble finding good information on proper servicing.

-Do all GLs have split lines for the rear pedal?
-From what I've gathered, best practice for split lines is to bleed the line(s) farthest from the master cylinder first, and the nearest line(s) last. Is this true for the Goldwing's system as well?
-Does a reverse flush (injecting into bleeder valves) work on split lines?

Extra deets: 2000 (gen 4) GL1500 36k miles, sat for extended periods with prior owner. Rear/front line(s) has zero pressure, reservoir is clean and full, pedal does nothing, just looks pretty and flops around. Still more useful than my ex though, at least this is salvageable. Front hand brake works fine. Supposedly after sitting, Goldwing rear seals can dry up and allow air, and after bleeding will need to be re-bled later once they're lubed up again from use. I understand this is a common problem; Usually just needs bleed or flush, sometimes an unseated rear line can rub the rear tire and develop a hole (not my case), master cylinder goes bad (which still creates some pressure, mine does not), or slaves get dirty and leak or cause bad fluid & air (also still has some pressure). I read something very vague about a pin that can fall out involved in actuating the master cylinder - anyone know anything about this?

Any comments appreciated, thanks guys.
 

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'90 1500; '00 1500
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Discussion Starter #3
Have you tried to bleed the system?
Not yet, but I figured that I want to replace the fluid regardless since I believe the previous owner just topped the reservoir and there may be bad fluid in the lines.
Now that you mention it, bleeding first would be a good diagnosis measure to make sure the system actually functions. Thanks.
 

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All of them 83 on have linked brakes, 1800s more complicated but not your worry. Some say longest line first, I say it doesn't matter. Try reverse bleeding if you don't get results the conventional way.
 

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Try to remove as much of the old fluid from the reservoir with a small hose and a suction ball. Then add fresh fluid and bleed.

Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
 

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'90 1500; '00 1500
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Discussion Starter #6
All of them 83 on have linked brakes, 1800s more complicated but not your worry. Some say longest line first, I say it doesn't matter. Try reverse bleeding if you don't get results the conventional way.
Great, thanks for the confirmation. Do they 1800s have ABS or something? And yeah what's the deal with the longest first, all I can think is that theoretically some bubbles from the long line might get flushed into the short line as the fluid passes through but the fluid pressure should prevent that and it definitely shouldn't matter with a reverse bleed.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Went ahead with a reverse flush on the front and, after some pumping and a little riding, both the front and rear feel pretty good. Little spongy, will have to flush the rear yet. Thanks for the tips guys.
 

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Great, thanks for the confirmation. Do they 1800s have ABS or something? And yeah what's the deal with the longest first, all I can think is that theoretically some bubbles from the long line might get flushed into the short line as the fluid passes through but the fluid pressure should prevent that and it definitely shouldn't matter with a reverse bleed.
ABS was optional on 1st gen 1800s but that's not the biggest difference in the brake system.
Seems to me bubbles are just as likely to backup into the long line as the short one, the difference is which one is highest.
1800 brake system.
1800 brake system.png
 
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Discussion Starter #9
that's not the biggest difference in the brake system.
Good lord, no, apparently it's not. So do the front right pads tend to wear more since 2 of the pistons are being actuated by full frontal braking force, whereas on the left, 2 of the pistons are receiving only 30% of the rear pedal braking force? Does the 1500 have several pistons per front caliper or is it just hand lever = right caliper, rear pedal = left caliper?
 

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Good lord, no, apparently it's not. So do the front right pads tend to wear more since 2 of the pistons are being actuated by full frontal braking force, whereas on the left, 2 of the pistons are receiving only 30% of the rear pedal braking force? Does the 1500 have several pistons per front caliper or is it just hand lever = right caliper, rear pedal = left caliper?
On your 1500, the rear caliper is on it's own line from the "rear brake" master cylinder rear most or end port, but the left front brake also is on it's own line from the same "rear brake" master cylinder but it's on a side port, it's not a split line that activates them but two separate lines from two separate ports. The right front caliper is solely on the right handle bar mounted "front brake" master cylinder.

What I find that works for me is I first bleed the rear caliper, then the left front, then the rear caliper again … and then if not happy, I do the front caliper again and the rear … maybe a 3rd time. I have also used the weight or bungee cord holding the rear brake pedal down over night with success. If alone, I use a vacuum bleeder "Mighty Vac", but my wife knows the drill so if she is nearby I get her to help with pedal actions doing the pump up-hold-pop bleeder-close bleeder-pump deal.

That long front hose goes up high before dropping to the left caliper, air bubbles like to migrate to high places.
322751
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That long front hose goes up high before dropping to the left caliper, air bubbles like to migrate to high places.
Awesome, really helpful, thank you. Must have had quite a bit of air in that line, wish I could have seen it come into the reservoir. Are there any joints or seals that can allow air in even if properly lubricated from recent use? Believe I've heard of banjo bolts going bad.
 

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Awesome, really helpful, thank you. Must have had quite a bit of air in that line, wish I could have seen it come into the reservoir. Are there any joints or seals that can allow air in even if properly lubricated from recent use? Believe I've heard of banjo bolts going bad.
The banjo bolts do not go bad. The washers can leak if released then re tightened but not usually an issue.

The GL 1200 had a Banjo bolt that was higher than the reservoir. When air got trapped in the bolt you couldn't make the air go down to eliminate it. You could turn the bars to the right then bleed. The act of turning the bars raised the reservoir above the bolt. You also could just crack the Banjo loose and bleed normally.

With all that said it is not usually an issue on the 1500 when it is on the center stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The banjo bolts do not go bad. The washers can leak if released then re tightened but not usually an issue.

The GL 1200 had a Banjo bolt that was higher than the reservoir. When air got trapped in the bolt you couldn't make the air go down to eliminate it. You could turn the bars to the right then bleed. The act of turning the bars raised the reservoir above the bolt. You also could just crack the Banjo loose and bleed normally.

With all that said it is not usually an issue on the 1500 when it is on the center stand.
Good to know about the washers, will keep an eye on that when I do quick bleeds in the future. Yeah I had read that and noticed that it's pretty high on the 1500 as well so I prop the bike to the right on jackstands for clutch work just to be safe.
 

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I understand the rear brake actuates both the rear caliper as well as a front caliper at a 70 rear : 30 front ratio. I'm having trouble finding good information on proper servicing.

-Do all GLs have split lines for the rear pedal?
-From what I've gathered, best practice for split lines is to bleed the line(s) farthest from the master cylinder first, and the nearest line(s) last. Is this true for the Goldwing's system as well?
-Does a reverse flush (injecting into bleeder valves) work on split lines?

Extra deets: 2000 (gen 4) GL1500 36k miles, sat for extended periods with prior owner. Rear/front line(s) has zero pressure, reservoir is clean and full, pedal does nothing, just looks pretty and flops around. Still more useful than my ex though, at least this is salvageable. Front hand brake works fine. Supposedly after sitting, Goldwing rear seals can dry up and allow air, and after bleeding will need to be re-bled later once they're lubed up again from use. I understand this is a common problem; Usually just needs bleed or flush, sometimes an unseated rear line can rub the rear tire and develop a hole (not my case), master cylinder goes bad (which still creates some pressure, mine does not), or slaves get dirty and leak or cause bad fluid & air (also still has some pressure). I read something very vague about a pin that can fall out involved in actuating the master cylinder - anyone know anything about this?

Any comments appreciated, thanks guys.
I just pulled my '85 GL1200 out of the back of the garage; late getting riding this year due to 'home improvements' list, and found no resistance in the rear brake pedal. My wife worked the pedal and I worked the bleeder valve, but poor-to-nothing results. Several years ago I bought SPEED BLEEDER valves for my '90 Ducati and they worked great, so I ordered a set for the Wing. Delivery was ( to western Massachusetts ) only a few days, installation was a breeze -nothing technical about removal and replacement, of course - and all three brake cylinders were done in about 5 minutes. Just crack the valve and let the internal ball check do the work as you pump away. When the bubbles stop showing up on your plastic hose, close the valve and go on to the next brake cylinder. A couple years ago, I had the local shop install braided stainless brake lines, and found out while bleeding the system that the rear brake pedal works the right side of the front wheel rotor, instead of the left side as the Haynes Manual says. Other than that, no problems. The web site has an application chart, so make sure you get the right ones for your ride.
Regards, James
 

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I understand the rear brake actuates both the rear caliper as well as a front caliper at a 70 rear : 30 front ratio. I'm having trouble finding good information on proper servicing.

-Do all GLs have split lines for the rear pedal?
-From what I've gathered, best practice for split lines is to bleed the line(s) farthest from the master cylinder first, and the nearest line(s) last. Is this true for the Goldwing's system as well?
-Does a reverse flush (injecting into bleeder valves) work on split lines?

Extra deets: 2000 (gen 4) GL1500 36k miles, sat for extended periods with prior owner. Rear/front line(s) has zero pressure, reservoir is clean and full, pedal does nothing, just looks pretty and flops around. Still more useful than my ex though, at least this is salvageable. Front hand brake works fine. Supposedly after sitting, Goldwing rear seals can dry up and allow air, and after bleeding will need to be re-bled later once they're lubed up again from use. I understand this is a common problem; Usually just needs bleed or flush, sometimes an unseated rear line can rub the rear tire and develop a hole (not my case), master cylinder goes bad (which still creates some pressure, mine does not), or slaves get dirty and leak or cause bad fluid & air (also still has some pressure). I read something very vague about a pin that can fall out involved in actuating the master cylinder - anyone know anything about this?

Any comments appreciated, thanks guys.
My '89 did that this Spring. The rear pedal went all the way down. Guys told me to take off the rear master cylinder cap, put something on the pedal to hole it all the way down and leave it for about 24 hours then put the cap back on, let the pedal rise up and I would have a full pedal. I was surprised the next day when it actually worked. Full brake pedal and no problems since. Also, make sure the master cylinder is full of fluid of course. I had a stick that I put between the right grip and the pedal to hold it down.
 

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Front right caliper first. Close bleeder screw just before pedal hits bottom (I prefer shorter strokes to keep the piston in the normal stroke range instead of all the way where the piston doesn't normally touch)and return the pedal slowly to prevent air slipping past the piston.

Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
 

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Unless you are rebuilding/replacing a master cylinder avoid getting air in. It can be hard to get it out.
When changing fluid remove the fluid from the reservoir with squeeze ball wipe clean and add a small amount of fluid lightly pump the handle, some old fluid will come back, suck fluid out again add fresh and bleed

Sent from my SM-J320V using Tapatalk
 
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