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Good evening all. I need your recommendations please on the best method to tie down a GL1200A onto a trailer. Thanks for your help
 

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lastcanuck wrote:
Good evening all. I need your recommendations please on the best method to tie down a GL1200A onto a trailer. Thanks for your help
Here is some info:

http://www.canadianrider.com/articles/tiedown.htm

http://www.chariot-trailer.com/index.php?option=content&task=view&id=15&Itemid=43

I've hauled a 1200 and a 1500 each for several hundred miles in my pickup without a wheel chock. It worked okay, but the load looked like a spider had caught the bike in a web, I had a lot of ropes and straps in use. Neither bike was damaged in any way, but I wouldn't do it again unless it was an emergency until I get a wheel chock. Goldwings are a difficult bike to tie down. Don't tie to the rear crash bars on a 1500, they aren't too skookum. There aren't many places you can tie to something solid and not end up having the rope or strap passing over the plastic. You don't want to put any serious pressure on the plastic!!
 

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When I trailered mine home, I used four monster "d"rings that I had installed bolted to frame steel in my enclosed trailer. I used four motorcyle tiedowns.

A buddy and I pulled the front ones, from the d-rings to the handlebars, and simultaneaously stood on the pegs. We were able to compress the forks, and use that to create tension on the straps.

Then, I added one to each side of the back, but crisscrossed them left strap behind the seat to a solid point on the right side. Same for the other side.

I had about 200 miles, over a mountain pass, and it rode like a dream. My response isnt rocket science, but I hope it helps.
 

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I have a trailer for my 1984 GL1200A for moving it into and out of winter storage plus the occasional trip to the shop prior to licensing her each year. First, use ratcheting tiedowns either new or in really good condition. Then you'll need four short nylon loops. Theses are wrapped on the front and rear case guards on each side. The tiedowns are hooked to each of them to avoid marking the chrome. The other ends of the tiedownsare then hooked securely tosolid mounting points on the trailer. I had a bracket made for the front of the trailer just a hair wider than the front tire. Oncethe tire is in there, it really adds to the stability. If you really want to avoid rockin' and rollin', two of the tiedowns should pull forward and two slightly to the rear. You can add two more straps / tiedowns to the front case guards and have them pull straight down.
 

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Bike on side stand, steering locked off on furthest left position, secure down and snug tight the left side of the bike, front and back by way of ratchet straps and crash bars. The only way the bike is going to fall to the right is if a strap snaps.Just as a precaution against slippage to the left, is to snug off the right side in the same manner but not muscle man tight, just snug as you want most of the pressure pulling to the left, but this will prevent the bike from sliding that way. Periodically check the tension during your haul. If you're paranoid.....add more straps.

Kyle
 

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Be sure the trailer springs are capable for the load.
Be sure you can roll the bike onto and off the trailer easily as this is were bad things usually happen.
Have your bud sit on the bike on the trailer and then use ratchet straps to tie down the bike at all the logical points. Ratchet the bike straight down on its suspension until you feel the ratchets are tight enough.
Dont use rope or put the bike on side or main stand , let the ratchets pull the bike down onto the trailer .
 

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I have a front wheel chock i bought from HF, love it.Front wheel in chock, 2 straps front and 2 back. Solid as a rock !!
 

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I have hauled both my 1100 and my 1500 on trailers in the past. I find on the 1500 that if you take a single strap and wrap it up over the base of the triple tree and down to the frame of the trailer it is the best if the tire can be supported by the front of the trailer. Then I added 2 additional straps from the case guards to the trailer as well as a secondary system in case the first strap would fail. I used the same method on the 1100 as well. Both times I had great success.
 

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Bike off of either stand.
Steering straight ahead.
Transmission in neutral.

The bike will move slightly no matter how tightly you think is it tied down. Having everything free will avoid putting stress on internal parts.

I use four ratchet straps. On an 1100 it is pretty easy to find solid points on the bike to tie to. On a 1200 it is a bit more difficult but they are there. I try as much as possible to tie directly to the frame. Everything will come along if the frame stays in place.

Nylon straps are pretty strong and stable. If they are badly chafed don't use them. Twenty bucks or so will get you a new set. Cotton straps or rope, if you have them, are subject to rot when exposed to oil.

I use a wheel chock for the front wheel. The last time I used a chock made from some pieces of two inch lumber assembled with screws. It wasn't even anchored to the trailer, but it was built with a 2x4 that ran all the way across the trailer. It wasn't anchored either.

Two straps go on the front of the bike and out at about a 45* angle to sides of the trailer. Two on the back in the same manner. The front strap should angle slightly to to front of the trailer and the back straps should angle slightly to the rear of the trailer. Not much angle is needed but it will keep the bike from rolling, much. Run the straps around some solid part of the bike and hook them to themselves making a loop. You don't need additional soft ropes doing it this way.

With the bike temporarily on the side stand, begin to tighten the straps on the right side of the bike. As the bike starts to come off the side stand begin to tighten the straps on the left side of the bike. You only need to tighten the front straps at first to get the bike upright and stabilized. Use the straps to compress the forks to about mid stroke.

Tighten the straps at the rear. The rear suspension will compress some. Move the bike by hand and the trailer will move with it.

Goldwings weigh about 700 pounds depending on the exact model. You are not hauling a D9 Cat. You can watch the bike in the mirrors and see that it is very obediently following along just as you have trained it to do.

Hauled a 1200 about 720 miles with this set up. Checked the straps after about 20 miles and then only when we stopped for necessities. The trailer was an aluminum commercially built unit with 8" wheels. I was concerned about the small wheels but they did well, even through the pot holes in Kansas construction zones. It had a 1/2" plywood deck and I put four eye bolts through the deck but not through the frame. I used fender washers top and bottom to give the eye bolts more area.

Just my thoughts on the subject,

Lyle
 
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