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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 84 Goldwing 1200 I was doing my stator and the cams got switched around when I did the valve guide seals. how would I go about checking it to make sure I'm at top dead center
 

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Cams have nothing to do with tdc, there is a marc on the flywheel that lines up with marks at the inspection hole
 

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First make sure the crank is NOT at TDC, turn it carefully until the TDC1 mark lines up in the inspection hole then turn it back about 1/8 turn. Then turn the cams so the up mark is up and the mark on the side of the pulley aligns with the mark on the inner cover, then turn the crank forward to TDC, put the belts on.
 

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Dave,can you clarify which way the flywheel should be moving when turning going up or going down.?
use the crank bolt or the stator bolt?
 
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👍👍Tks John
 

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The crank bolt, turn it Clockwise as you are looking at it from the front of the bike.
Exactly. The rotor bolt is harder to control the rotation than with the crank bolt & shouldn't be turned backward.
 
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Dave,can you clarify which way the flywheel should be moving when turning going up or going down.?
use the crank bolt or the stator bolt?
I have been caught in the same situation. The first thing to remember is to take the plugs out if you have not already done so. With the plugs out the crank will turn smooth and steady in either direction. With that being said you can rotate the crank in any or both directions knowing that even if you feel the clink of a piston touching a valve it wi;; not hurt anything. If on the other hand you try to rotate the cam/s in "unknown territory" it is all herky jerky and might be possible to do some damage. So turn the crank as the feeler. If you hear/feel the clink stop and try the rotating the crank the other way around. If you get interference that way you just are not going to be lucky.
At this point I would just loosen all the cam holder bolts a turn or two loose at a time. Work from the middle out both directions so the cam holder rises pretty straight up. Do both heads.It should not be necessary to take the holder off completely but it is OK to do so.
So now you have positioned the crank at TDC1. and the battle is done. Down hill from here. As Gave said above turn the crankshaft 1/8 to 1/4 turn.Now all 4 pistons are a safe distance down in the cylinder and there is no chance that any valves could clash when you tighten the cam holder back in place. First pull the cam holder back in to location again pulling it down from the middle first so it pulls down flat a turn ot two just like when you removed it.
With the 4 pistons located down in the cylinder you can now turn the cams in any direction or around in circles if you want until you get the marks aligned.
Once the cams are aligned it is safe to bring the crank back to TDC by rotating it back the 1/8 to 1/4 turn you previously rotated it. Make sure you go the right way. Not all the way around to TDC but just back the fraction of a turn.
I was typing while John and Dave posted so I am going to post anyway. :rolleyes: :unsure:😎.

As slow as I type he is probably riding already. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have a 84 Goldwing 1200 I was doing my stator and the cams got switched around when I did the valve guide seals. how would I go about checking it to make sure I'm at top dead center
I meant where are the cams supposed to be when it is at top dead center they mite be 180 off how do I know
 

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It's impossible to have the cams 180 off. You can have 1 180 off and it will still run but strange as it will have 2 cylinders firing at once but turn the both 180 and it's still right. The proper way to set them is with the up marks up and the crank at T1 & the marks at the side lined up.
 

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I have been caught in the same situation. The first thing to remember is to take the plugs out if you have not already done so. With the plugs out the crank will turn smooth and steady in either direction. With that being said you can rotate the crank in any or both directions knowing that even if you feel the clink of a piston touching a valve it wi;; not hurt anything. If on the other hand you try to rotate the cam/s in "unknown territory" it is all herky jerky and might be possible to do some damage. So turn the crank as the feeler. If you hear/feel the clink stop and try the rotating the crank the other way around. If you get interference that way you just are not going to be lucky.
At this point I would just loosen all the cam holder bolts a turn or two loose at a time. Work from the middle out both directions so the cam holder rises pretty straight up. Do both heads.It should not be necessary to take the holder off completely but it is OK to do so.
So now you have positioned the crank at TDC1. and the battle is done. Down hill from here. As Gave said above turn the crankshaft 1/8 to 1/4 turn.Now all 4 pistons are a safe distance down in the cylinder and there is no chance that any valves could clash when you tighten the cam holder back in place. First pull the cam holder back in to location again pulling it down from the middle first so it pulls down flat a turn ot two just like when you removed it.
With the 4 pistons located down in the cylinder you can now turn the cams in any direction or around in circles if you want until you get the marks aligned.
Once the cams are aligned it is safe to bring the crank back to TDC by rotating it back the 1/8 to 1/4 turn you previously rotated it. Make sure you go the right way. Not all the way around to TDC but just back the fraction of a turn.
I was typing while John and Dave posted so I am going to post anyway. :rolleyes: :unsure:😎.

As slow as I type he is probably riding already. :)
Thank you I will give it a try when I get out of work
 

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It's impossible to have the cams 180 off. You can have 1 180 off and it will still run but strange as it will have 2 cylinders firing at once but turn the both 180 and it's still right. The proper way to set them is with the up marks up and the crank at T1 & the marks at the side lined up.
Just like Dave said. It is like a 5 part process

1) Carefully work the crankshaft back to TDC1

2) Turn the crankshaft 1/8 to 1/4 turn in either direction. This will insure all pistons are down in the cylinders quite a distance, Now you can rotate cams any way you want/need to with no fear of hurting any valves.

3) Check that the up mark is up and align the marks on the cams with the marks on the engine. (left and right cams) You will see there is only one way to do this. If the marks are aligned you are good to go.

4) Rotate the crankshaft back the 1/8 to 1/4 turn you did earlier.

5) With the crank at TDC1 and both cams aligned install the belts. Install the ancillary parts and you are done.

You might have a bit of a wrestling match with one of the cams as it probably will not want to stay right on the mark. The valve spring pressure wants to rotate that cam. Not a big deal just a little inconvenient. Many ask themselves if the cams are aligned right because the marks are slightly off each other. If you ask yourself "would changing the belt one whole tooth make it better or worse?" Of you answer worse that is as good as it gets. When you get done installing the belts and it can't hurt to turn the engine a few turns with a wrench just to be sure all is well. If you did everything properly you will be fine but it never hurt to check. 😎

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You might have a bit of a wrestling match with the left cam as it probably will not want to stay right on the mark.

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That's the other left. :p
 
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You can have 1 180 off and it will still run but strange as it will have 2 cylinders firing at once but turn the both 180 and it's still right.
Gotta chew on that for a while. Seems right if you are saying both turned 180 crankshaft degrees, Otherwise wouldn't it be 2:1 ratio. That is 180 degrees crank versus 90 camshaft degrees, Half turn of crank versus 1/4 turn on the cam etc?? :rolleyes:
 

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Gotta chew on that for a while. Seems right if you are saying both turned 180 crankshaft degrees, Otherwise wouldn't it be 2:1 ratio. That is 180 degrees crank versus 90 camshaft degrees, Half turn of crank versus 1/4 turn on the cam etc?? :rolleyes:
I mean turning the cams 180 or the crank 360, it comes back to the same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Just like Dave said. It is like a 5 part process

1) Carefully work the crankshaft back to TDC1

2) Turn the crankshaft 1/8 to 1/4 turn in either direction. This will insure all pistons are down in the cylinders quite a distance, Now you can rotate cams any way you want/need to with no fear of hurting any valves.

3) Check that the up mark is up and align the marks on the cams with the marks on the engine. (left and right cams) You will see there is only one way to do this. If the marks are aligned you are good to go.

4) Rotate the crankshaft back the 1/8 to 1/4 turn you did earlier.

5) With the crank at TDC1 and both cams aligned install the belts. Install the ancillary parts and you are done.

You might have a bit of a wrestling match with the left cam as it probably will not want to stay right on the mark. The valve spring pressure wants to rotate that cam. Not a big deal just a little inconvenient. Many ask themselves if the cams are aligned right because the marks are slightly off each other. If you ask yourself "would changing the belt one whole tooth make it better or worse?" Of you answer worse that is as good as it gets. When you get done installing the belts and it can't hurt to turn the engine a few turns with a wrench just to be sure all is well. If you did everything properly you will be fine but it never hurt to check. 😎

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all I know is when I took the belt off the right cam moved like it shown on the video when I put it back together I didn't have to hold nothing the belt went right together and was straight and everything lined up perfect that's what scared me
Just like Dave said. It is like a 5 part process

1) Carefully work the crankshaft back to TDC1

2) Turn the crankshaft 1/8 to 1/4 turn in either direction. This will insure all pistons are down in the cylinders quite a distance, Now you can rotate cams any way you want/need to with no fear of hurting any valves.

3) Check that the up mark is up and align the marks on the cams with the marks on the engine. (left and right cams) You will see there is only one way to do this. If the marks are aligned you are good to go.

4) Rotate the crankshaft back the 1/8 to 1/4 turn you did earlier.

5) With the crank at TDC1 and both cams aligned install the belts. Install the ancillary parts and you are done.

You might have a bit of a wrestling match with one of the cams as it probably will not want to stay right on the mark. The valve spring pressure wants to rotate that cam. Not a big deal just a little inconvenient. Many ask themselves if the cams are aligned right because the marks are slightly off each other. If you ask yourself "would changing the belt one whole tooth make it better or worse?" Of you answer worse that is as good as it gets. When you get done installing the belts and it can't hurt to turn the engine a few turns with a wrench just to be sure all is well. If you did everything properly you will be fine but it never hurt to check. 😎

.
thank you very much it did start for me I'm not sure how good it runs, I don't have the radiator or nothing in it or the stator hooked up.thank you very much
 
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