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Well it's New Years day, and my New Year's resolution is to not put it off any longer. I have been collecting tips for being a safer rider for some time now, and I am going to put them in a manual for m/cyclists.

I need everyone to post their favourite safety tips to this thread. If you have just 1 I would like it. If you have a whole list, even better.

I will edit them all and combine them with all the others I have/will get, into a well laid out advanced training manual for m/cycle riders who want to live long, accident free lives!

I got the idea to do this about a year ago when I saw a long list of "how to ride safely" ideas on a blog. Like all other m/cyclists out there I thought that I knew it all, as I have been riding for 49 years accident free. Well the truth is nobody knows it all - I was amazed at how many tips there were in that list that I had never even thought of!

So I would like to give this back to every m/cyclist out there. I will make it available on line for anybody to read who is prepared to admit that just maybe they don't know it all! If I can save even 1 life by doing this, it will be worth all the time and effort!

So please reply and post all your tips - I can't do this without your help - every one of you! Also, if you know of the location of any lists of tips like this already posted on another blog, please let me know the location so I can include anything that I don't already have.

Take care, Happy New Year, and let's all ride a little safer!

Steve.



:waving:
 

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I always do a walk about of the bike, another words a close visual check of everything that includes all fluid levels, then a quick check on lights and brakes before starting the bike and if tires look low I check them with a gauge.then start the bike let it warm up alittle and listen for any foriegn noises then if ok go for a ride.
 

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As you are riding, pay attention to stale green signals. This is a signal that has been green for your approach for some time, maybe for as long as you had it in sight. It is likely to turn red, especially if there is a vehicle on one of the side street approaches. In this case you should be prepared to stop for a red signal.
 

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what ive noticed its to get on the bike with one mind set ride it like your invisible

thats how i ride i dont expect anyone to see me 99percent of the time its "i didnt see you"

so i am a super defensive rider when i come up to a stop sign or a intersection i just put on a retard cap to imagine how dumb people can drive and most of the time im correct.
 

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+1 on the previous.


I have a habit of riding back from the vehicle in front of me allowing me time to see what they see and to react in time to prevent a collision. Never follow anything so close you are focusing on that vehicle/bike more than you are on reading the road.


Never stop close to the white line, stay back a full vehicle's length. 2 reasons. Left turners will cut into your space, you need it for an Escape Route if a following vehicle is about to run over you. Watch your mirrors all the time.

never start out first across the intersection, let others be your "firewall" for red light runners.

Always keep your mirrors "working" by rotating your eyes around you. Stay aware of your environment. Keep an escape route open.

When stopping do NOT keep your bike straight/inline with traffic. That presents the least possible amount to see for following traffic. Stop at an angle towards your Escape Route.

If traffic is heavy coming to an intersection, weave inside your lane flashing the handbrake or footbrake to cause your tail lights to activate. The weaving causes a distraction to the following driver and they start paying attention.

never ride parallel to a large truck. You cannot see the right front of that truck or anywhere to their rear. A tire blows and hits you?? Or in my case, the driver needs an Escape Route and takes it out of your lane (Totalled my bike when he merged me into the center median wall)

Always have fresh water and first aid items. Snack bars, rain gear, tool kit, tire repair kit,

#1 though, is to keep your eyes open and moving around you. Do NOT get tunnel vision by looking only straight forward. That is deadly.
 

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Piled Higher and Deeper
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understand the bikes limits.

understand YOUR limits, and how they relate to the bikes limits.

it may outpower your abilities...
 

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Over here in the UK we have something called the institute of advanced motorcyclists. I took and passed there test some time ago and was a motorcycle instructor for several years with a local training centre for what was then the part one driving test.



I have to admit that I have not retaken the I.O.M test anually as they suggest but one thing I did learn from their programme is that their own Bible, if you like, is re written every year and their techniques change as motorcycle design and road law change.



Their main mantra is and will always be observation. Position on the road to allow the maxium view of on coming problems. The line in and out of corners for observation is not the same as the racing line. Speed aceleration and gears are all different too.



That all saidI do have accidents and in all cases I can say that it was my lack of observation that contributed, even in the worst one. I was hit from behind by a large van on a round about which I had noticed approaching at speed to join but I had simply not noticed he would not stop. You could say he was totally at fault as in UK law he hit me from behind and as such was totally at fault but still I had seen him some way off but not at the time made the judgement call to slow down and be prepared to stop even if I did have right of way.



I always taught my students that even in accidents that they could not forsee they would always have some fault and to look and learn from that.



Harsh but true.
 

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Have good riding skills and be sure and have medical and liability insurance if not full coverage to replace your bike. Never ride in your spot, always ride ahead, beside and behind your spot. In short you know where you are but need to also know what is around you.

I judge my riding as decent if I never have to stop at a red light. I always gear down, slow down and try to let the light turn green before I get there. I do not want to be a sitting target.
 

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When stopping to pay a road toll be aware that many vehicles stop at the booth and drops of oil, transmission fluid, engine coolant can cause a slick surface when you put your feet down to pay. An EZpass transponder is a great feature to have.
 

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When riding behind a line of traffic position yourself to watch the leading vehicle.

When passing a slow moving vehicle first look for driveways or other possible left turns (right if you drive on the left). Don't trust a turn signal or lack of.

Always consider what stupid move another driver could make, they probably will.
 

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When in traffic on 4-lane roads I always watch for brake lights 1/4 to 1/2 mile ahead of me & adjust accordingly. If they are stopping sanely then usually by the time the driver in front of you looks up from texting, putting on makeup, playing with their radio they will have to lock their brakes down. Have the idiot cushion already established. I have learned this from 11 years of driving a semi with over 1,000,000 accident free miles.
 

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When following large trucks or any vehicle, if you can't see their mirrors they can't see you, this also gives you a good following/stopping distance.
When driving in dark never let your lights illuminate the vehicle in front of you, this also gives you good stopping distance and time to avoid objects the vehicle in front of you might straddle or throw up in your path.
Rode Slow & Safe:action::action::action: :waving:
 

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Always be awrare of your surroundings, and try to anticipate possible actions by others. Never ride to close to parked cars, allow for suddens doors to swing open.
 

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Stay in the left wheel track (US) as much as possible. This puts you directly in front of the drivers who are following. It gives you more room to your right to make evasive moves if needed, particularly on 2 lane roads with no paved shoulder. It also puts you further from the curb making you more noticeable to traffic at intersections. You will be further from parked cars on city streets reducing the chances of getting hit by a car door opening or a car pulling out from a parking spot.
 

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Keep your throttle wristbelow your knuckles. When a person panics they tend to straighten their wrists out. If your wrist isabove your fingers and you panic you end up adding throttle and accelerating into what may be a dangerous situation. Keeping your wrist below your fingers will at least have you go off the gas some before you enter whatever situation that scared you in the first place.

Also, use just the end part of your index and middle fingers on the clutchwhen you release it. That way you hold theclutch handle in the same part of your hand and it doesn't slide on your fingers and possibly slip out, causing you to pop the clutch unexpectedly.
 

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ALWAYS ride with the assumption that the other people Do Not See you. The number one response form cagers involved with a motorcycle accident is 'I never saw them'. I've had many close calls with people who looked at me with that deer in the headlights look. If I wasn't paying attention to their inattention I probably wouldn't be around today.
 

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AZgl1500 wrote:
Never stop close to the white line, stay back a full vehicle's length. 2 reasons. Left turners will cut into your space, you need it for an Escape Route if a following vehicle is about to run over you. Watch your mirrors all the time..

Keep in mind that signal detection is often located close to the stop bar. If you stop back a vehicle length from the stop bar, the signal may not service your approach.
 

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Practice low speed maneuvers a lot.

When stopped always have an out planned ahead of time for escaping danger.

Keep peripheral vision keen to avoid forest rats.

If you decide to pass a vehicle, get it done and don't ride beside a vehicle for long periods.

Mirrors, mirrors, mirrors. Can't watch them enough.
 
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