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Im getting things around to day to head out to SD . Iv concluded the Wing will stay home and the V star will go on the trailer . Its just to much of a hassel to put that big of bike on and off the trailer even thoughthe trailer islow , the star is just lighter / smaller and easier to deal with .



Maybe its age , maybe its wisdom but i heard the two travel together any way :action:
 

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Why bring the cage and trailer?
That I don`t understand...
Wing or VStar in running condition will get U there, right?
 

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No cage , a box . Taken the motor home . Wife can not take a ride of thatdistance . 1200 miles one way .



3or4 hundred miles a day would be more then she can deal with and we have a limited amount of time to make the trip .
 

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I see...
And hounor to you for that inconvenience ;)
But I would still consider the Wing as the better choice, for when U get there. SD is not that warm a place to be, this time a year, and the Wing`ll give the both of you a much more pleasent stay, right?
How long are you guy`s gonna stay there?
 

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Be out there 3 or 4 days then head back . I agree on the warmth from the wing . Iv got a couple days , i may still work on it . I gave it some thought today , the back of the trailer is about 8 " off the ground . If i was to back up to a curb and lay the ramp down it would be a fairly level load / unload .



Another thought was a shovel . Wouldnt take much of a little hole to drop the trailer tire in and drop the trailer right down .



Issue is going on and off the trailer , i find it very difficult with the wing v's the star . Theres that short distance you just cant put your feet down and you got to come up slow to make sure your front tire hits the narrow channel .



Photo of said trailer .



 

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If you made that ramp as wide as the trailer, you'd be stylin"!!!
 

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hatchetman wrote:
If you made that ramp as wide as the trailer, you'd be stylin"!!!

You are correct , just a bit narrower so it fit bewteen the springs . It slids into a track under the trailer .



I concluded this morning its only a matter of nerves , Loading the wing is not the issue , its unloading that feels pretty hairy . Ill adjust , worse case is , i drop it on the unload . Its not a cherry bike so ill risk it . I practiced putting the wing on and off a few times now . Confedence is building .



Cell phone pic from the pratces runs of loading unloading .

2 days to go and we are out of here .



 

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Nothing better 'n having your own bed to sleep in and pot to pee in either Dragon Wagon.
 

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how about making 2 smaller ramps to go on the sides of the big one maybe that might help you out

then when not in use they could be sides for the trailer
 

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Ill end up cutting out the under rails and making a wider ramp . Dont have time before this trip though .
 

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Also the grain of the plywood is running the wrong way. For better strength you want the grain to run from end to end, not across.
 

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a good trick is to put some old rubber car mats on the ramp for grip, there cheap at the salvage yard, free in some cases. also roof shingles or a snowmobile track works too.



just a thought for making it safer.
 

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Bagmaster wrote:
Also the grain of the plywood is running the wrong way. For better strength you want the grain to run from end to end, not across.
This i didnt have a clue about , im no carpenter for sure .



Plywood dont seem at all slick on the ramp of trailer . The issue is backing off the ramp , your rear tire hits the ground and then while the front tire is coming down there is a few feet you can not touch . Im even doubting a wider ramp will cure it the more i think about it . You still have the same effect for about 4 or 5 feet going backwards . Drving on you have a little momentum and its easy to keep the bike up right .
 

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The trailer I used to haul my wing home had a ramp in the middle for the bike (tires) and two ramps on the sides for your feet.. the feet ramps were just 2x6 or 2x8's with a bolt on the end of it that hooked into a hole in the trailer bed. it worked well. you could do what that guy did for his foot ramps.. he just had another hole in the bed of the trailer that the same bolts that hooked into the back of the trailer went into and then used bungee straps to hold the ramps down to the trailer bed along side of the bike for transporting.

the trick is to make your foot boards a different length then the bike ramp.. longer if I remember right.. that gives the foot ramp boards enough height to overcome the angle transition of the bike going onto the trailer. I hope all this makes sense :)
 

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Side ramps could be just a couple of 2x4 or 2x6's, you could tuck them under the trailer through a pair of U bolts, or you could use them as side rails on the trailer itself with a couple of through bolts to hold them on.
One word of advice though, make them longer than your center ramp, then when the front wheel is part way down the ramp, and the back wheel is 1-2 feet off of the ramp, your feet will still be able to reach the side ramps.
 

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Bagmaster wrote:
Also the grain of the plywood is running the wrong way. For better strength you want the grain to run from end to end, not across.
Plywood layers are on alternating patterns, aren't they?
 

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Geezerglider wrote:
Bagmaster wrote:
Also the grain of the plywood is running the wrong way. For better strength you want the grain to run from end to end, not across.
Plywood layers are on alternating patterns, aren't they?

Correct, alternating patterns.

Wood is stronger parallel to the grain than perpendicular to the grain. This is especially true in tension, where wood has little strength across the grain;it is also true in compression but to a lesser extent. Wood is much stiffer parallel to the grain than perpendicular to the grain. The modulus of elasticity across the grain is approximately 1/35 of the modulus of elasticity parallel to the grain. because of the differences in strength and stiffness, the plies that have the grain parallel to the stress are much more effective than those that have the grain perpendicular to the stress. The orientation of the panel and its directional properties are immportant to the proper use of the plywood.

Also, remember that not all plywood is created equal. The grade of the veneers is one of the factors that determine the grade of the panel. Plywood is often comprised of the best grade being the face then back, with the crossband (inner layers) being of a lesser grade.

The plywood will have a grade trademark and sheathing grade. I attached an old .pdf that is easy to use for determining the proper plywood for the job. It is not current standards but applicable herefor the most part.


In any event the picture appears to be 5ply with adequate width and should be okay provided it isn't wet (not that it will reduce the effectiveness of most modern glues), the approach when loading is SLOW to reduce forces. I would however turn the plywood the other direction and use it in the 8ft dimension rather than the 4ft dimension. You could also add support with mild steel along the perimeter.
 

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Geezerglider wrote:
Bagmaster wrote:
Also the grain of the plywood is running the wrong way. For better strength you want the grain to run from end to end, not across.
Plywood layers are on alternating patterns, aren't they?
It's the direction of the outer layers of wood that make the difference. Like a truss the outer layers take the greatest amount of compression and tension and have more effect on the strength of the sheet than the inner plies whichever way they are oriented.



Hey, Dragon wagon, just drop a2x6 on each side of the ramp for a place to put your feet. They really don't even need to be attached to the trailer. A slight dip or a couple of holes for the wheels really help as you mentioned. I used a small ditch to back my pickup into when loading a 'Wing into it. Your trailer wouldn't need much since it's so low to start with.
 

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that looks good on the back of the trailer, i agree with what someone says, make the ramp the width of the trailer and a bit longer, with a little bit of practice, you'll back that bike off without thinking of it
 
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