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O:K,
So I rebuilt my carbs using Randakks kits(great kit, great price);)
Now I'd like to install my new points and set timing.

The Clymers manual is a little vague on this, so could one of you old wise ones please walk me through how to static time this old gal?

I found the small dimple on the end of the camshaft, is that dimple have to line up with the step on the points, or just that high point of that side of the camshaft have to?

Also, I'm a little consused on the test light method....:baffled:

Thanks in advance
 

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Randakk's site explains it well. However here we go:

1. remove the timing cap
2. remove spark plugs
3. put the bike in 5th gear
4. remove the ignition points cover
5. use the back wheel (or kickstart lever) to rotate the engine until the high point of the cam lobe meets points 1&2, which will be the most opening for the points. Then insert a feeler guage and set the opening between .014-.016" by loosening the points adjusting screws most adjacent to the points themselves.
6. Rotate the wheel again until you get the cam lobe to go to the other set of points, 3&4. Do the same with opening the points to about .014-.016"
8. Attach a circuit test light's clip to ground on the frame. Place the probe on points 1&2, or remove the side cover, and put the probe into the wires leading to points 1&2 (yellow/blue?).
9. Rotate the engine and look at the timing marks on the engine flywheel you exposed by removing the cap. When the mark reaches F-1 (the f mark), the light should come on. Loosen the base plate screws and rotate the points plate until the light just comes on at the mark.
10. Switch the probe to the other set of points or wires and rotate the engine 360 degrees until the F-2 mark comes up. The light should come on. If not, loosen the adjusting screws on top of the base plate, above and below points 3&4 until the light just comes on.
11. If you can't get either to work, you might have to go back to the beginning and reduce the points gap (the closed points will close the circuit, thus making the light go on, which should all happen at the appropriate timing marks for each set!) starting with set 1&2, then start all over again.

There is a way to make sure you get the best timing for these bikes, as one compression stroke will fire a little early or late. On Randakk's site he has a 'split-timing' technique to split the difference. He suggests keeping the points gap as large as possible to start with. It's best explained on his site.

Once you go through the cycle once it will make sense. It may take you 3-4 cycles of setting gaps/timing to get it right, but it's so straightforward with static timing because the light either comes on or not, and you just adjust the points plate(s) forward or back to set it, once you've got the gaps set right. Remember to keep the gaps as wide as possible.
 

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Since yours is a '77, turning the engine is easy with the use of the kick starter (located under the right shelter cover, it plugs in just behind the stator housing at the rear of the engine, left side)

Remove the points cover and turn the engine until the highest part of the points cam opens one set of points. Gap to .012 to .016" (or .3 to .4mm). Repeat for the other side.

Take the timing cover off the top of the engine and you'll see the flywheel. Center the 1-F mark in the hole. (The timing cover is just aft of the carbs on top of the engine, left of center... it's about 1" in diameter and has a screw slot.)

Connect an ohm meter, one side to ground, the other side to the nut that holds the wire terminal on the left point. Set the ohm meter to read alarge change in resistance - (you'll only see a small change). The ignition switch does not have to be on for this.

Loosen the two screws that hold the main back-plate stationary and rotate the plate until you see a small change in resistance. Get it as close as you can to this boundary between two resistance values and tighten the screws.

Rotate the engine to the 2-F mark.

Notice that there is a sub-plate under the right-hand points that's sandwiched between the #2 points and main plate. loosen the sub-plate screws and repeat the procedure outlined above for #1.

That's it.

It takes about 500 miles to break the points in. After 500 miles, repeat the procedure and they should be fine for the life of the points.
 

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I just re-did my timing today using the buzz box feature of my meter - buzzes until the cuircut is interupted - points open. This worked very well and the bike runs even better than before.

Before I used the buzz box I tried a 12v test lamp - light never came on! Measuring the voltageI discovered that I only had 5 volts on the 1-2 set of points - the reason the test light didn't work.The 3-4 setshowed 12v.

Anyone have any explaination as to why I would not have 12v on the 1-2 set of points? Like I said it seems to run well, it's just a bit confusing.
 

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Keefer wrote:
I just re-did my timing today using the buzz box feature of my meter - buzzes until the cuircut is interupted - points open. This worked very well and the bike runs even better than before.

Before I used the buzz box I tried a 12v test lamp - light never came on! Measuring the voltageI discovered that I only had 5 volts on the 1-2 set of points - the reason the test light didn't work.The 3-4 setshowed 12v.

Anyone have any explaination as to why I would not have 12v on the 1-2 set of points? Like I said it seems to run well, it's just a bit confusing.
A lot easier to use an ohm meter (or your buzzer). That way you don't have to turn the ignition switch on because you're only measureing continuity between ground and thecoil side of the points.

The reason your test light didn't work; It starts out at 12 volts at the ignition switch,then goes through a ballast resistor which drops it to about 7 volts, then through the primary windings of a transformer (called a coil) that creates an electrical field in the secondary windings. (Which collapses when voltage is removed from the primary windings [points open]. When the field collapses your spark plugs fire.) Anyway, the voltage you get at the points is probably insufficient to light a 12 volt test light.
 

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A buzzer has always been my favorite, it leaves your hands and eyes free to work on the point timing.
 

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Thanks. I didn't think that there was a real problem as the bike runs well. Just wanted to see if there was a reason for the lower than expected voltage.
 

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I did the test with a 12v test light on my 1976 gl1000 and got a strange result. The light came on at f1 and as I continued to rotate the cam the lite dimmed but didn't turn off completely until it got bright again at f2 then shut off completely until f1. Is this normal?The points seem to be closing but I don't understand the dim light?
 
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