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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just completed the rebuild of forks on my 1984 gl1200 Interstate. scotthohio's tutorial (and others input) were invaluable. Thanks.

Replaced seals, dust caps and all bushings, new fork oil. No problem.
{BTW - this is with forks still on the bike}

Installed Progressive Fork Springs. Piece of cake. Only took 2 minutes! Oh yeah, after about an hour and a half of grunting and groaning! :)

Biggest worry? NOT stripping the threads in the fork tubes. We had plently of muscle. My buddy and I could push the springs below the threads in the tubes with ONE hand. The trouble was pushing down on the caps/springs and getting the threads starting without crossthreading.

Worked with the left side 45 minutes or so. No luck. My bike has the Voyager Trike kit, so we stand on any part of the bike and apply as much pressure as we could muster. After taking a breather, I said "lets try the other side." Used same methods used on the previous side. Boom! cap went on 1st time. Really, 1 minute or less!

Took a biscut break at the Hardee's. Came back and began to work on remaining side. After another half hour or so, the stars aligned and got it in as well. Whew!

My 7 point Warning Label:

1- Don't try this at home UNLESS you are a very patient person.
2- Don't try this at home UNLESS you are a very persistant person.
3- Don't try this at home UNLESS you have a friend with more muscles than brains that you can trick into helping you.;)
4- Don't try this at home IF your prone to fits of anger/cussing and throwing things.
5- Don't try this at home IF there are small children within ear shot.
6- Don't try this at home IF you fear lossing your religion.:praying:
7. Finally and by all means don't try this at home if a recent meal has worked it's way through your disgestive system and is nearing the exit. The force required to get the springs in COULD case an embarassing situation. <>next time I'm wearing an adult diaper:)<>

Only had time for a short ride. No leaks! PTL.

No rave reviews on the Progressive's ... yet. Will report in when I've had time for a longer ride and time to fine tune. DID notice some improvement even after just a 20 mile ride, but installed a new BG Spitfire on the front at the same time. New tires always make a huge difference.

My first fork rebuild. Maybe my last .... until someone comes up with a easier way to get them darn fork springs back in.

THANKS all help from this great site. I'll be back, as next project is rear tire and check out final drive.

Sirkitrider
 

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2000 GL1500SE
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I've found out an east way to change the fork fluid. Remove the shocks, pump out the fork oil without rewmoving the caps, and get a syringe (Sinilar a Battery Acid Syring), insert the tube into the fluid, and put in the required amount in the syringe. Put the tube in the botton of the drain hohe, and pull the shocks UP as you depress the syringe. Very simple, and very effective.
David
 

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Impersonating a mechanic
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Maybe you tried this. . .

When I did this a couple years ago, I read a tip -- maybe on this site -- that said more or less:


  • Just before you put the springs in the tubes, put the cap on lightly and turn it slowly counter clockwise until you feel or hear a click. That lines up the threads.


  • Then with the cap at that exact spot, take a magic marker and mark both the cap and the tube at the same time. Then once you've put the spring back in, you have a reference point to begin turning cap.


  • After struggling for hours, this made it easier on my 1200-I.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Bellboy40,

All the homemade tools I've seen are for use with the forks off the bike

(I think?) I did not want to remove the forks from the bike, BUT if I had

it to do over again .... I think I would remove the forks and fab up one of

those excellent tools shown on that link. Removing the forks NOW seems

easier than the hassle of getting the springs back in?


Also, I really like the drill out and tap for a bolt with o-ring in the cap for easy peasy fork oil change.:claps:

Sirkitrider
 

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Nylon strap (tie down)

Just take a nylon strap thru the fork tree and over your shoulder, adjust it so you can push down on the caps while it holds you down in place.
Easy Peezy
 

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Vintage Rider
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IMO, the threads on those caps are just too fine. They are VERY easy to cross thread even with no spring inside. And I have never seen fork caps that did not have threads like that. I rebuilt the forks on my XT225, and installed home made spacers on top of the springs to preload them. Biggest problem? Getting the threads started on the caps.

When I first saw your thread I thought you had bounced one off your head. I had a car coil spring compressor break just as I was removing the compressed spring, the spring hit my hand hard (it hurt for weeks) and then flew down the street half a block away.
 

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The Irish Crew
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Progressives are very hard to push down. By comparison, the stock springs are a piece of cake.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just take a nylon strap thru the fork tree and over your shoulder, adjust it so you can push down on the caps while it holds you down in place.
Easy Peezy
The strap was next on the list of things to try. Luckily was able to grunt them in. Thanks - Sirkitrider
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You should have read one of these, there are a couple other tools for compressing the fork springs in the bike on this site also.

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/2-goldwing-technical-forum/366034-gl1500-fork-re-assembly.html


http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/2-goldwing-technical-forum/391819-fork-jig.html

Keep them in mind for the next time :lash:
Thanks Lionelgo50 - I did read that thread. Could not use the method b/c I have the 1200 and the caps don't have air screws in them. HOWEVER next time I think I will drill and tap for screw/o-ring that would permit me to use your method and the tool use fabbed up. AND make changing the fork oil a brezze as well. Lots of upside.
Thanks - Sirkitrider
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
When I did this a couple years ago, I read a tip -- maybe on this site -- that said more or less:


  • Just before you put the springs in the tubes, put the cap on lightly and turn it slowly counter clockwise until you feel or hear a click. That lines up the threads.

  • Then with the cap at that exact spot, take a magic marker and mark both the cap and the tube at the same time. Then once you've put the spring back in, you have a reference point to begin turning cap.

  • After struggling for hours, this made it easier on my 1200-I.
Yup. Tried that. Didn't help. Of course YMMV - Thanks - Sirkitrider
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
IMO, the threads on those caps are just too fine. .......

When I first saw your thread I thought you had bounced one off your head.
Yeah Jerry H .... it must have to do with keeping oil and air in better than courser threads???

And, did my due dilligence and read MANY great threads on here and was prepared. I actully was expecting those springs to have way more preload than they actually did. Springs came out quicker than I was thinking but only popped up 6" or so.

Sirkitrider
 

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Yeah Jerry H .... it must have to do with keeping oil and air in better than courser threads???

And, did my due dilligence and read MANY great threads on here and was prepared. I actully was expecting those springs to have way more preload than they actually did. Springs came out quicker than I was thinking but only popped up 6" or so.

Sirkitrider
I would think that some kind of seal would be better for that rather than using super fine threads, but then I've never built a motorcycle.
 

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Junior Grue
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I would think that some kind of seal would be better for that rather than using super fine threads, but then I've never built a motorcycle.
The threads have nothing to do with sealing, that's handled by an o-ring.
Fine threads are used to reduce the wall thickness of the tubes.
 

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I find it alot easier off the bike. Also, you didn't say if you jacked the front end up to take all the compression out of the fork ass'y. If you don't do that, it would make the job darn near impossible. If you think those are hard, don't try an 88-94 1500.
 
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