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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, we have a 2002 gl1800 with almost 100K miles on it, and with the original stock fork springs.
The anti-dive has been disables, but the front is very spongy, and really dives bad coming to a stop, making the bike unstable at parking lot speeds.
I bought a complete fork rebuild kit, and progressive springs. (also allballs tapered stem bearings)
I stopped at the local honda shop and talked to a mechanic about installing the progressive springs.
He said it is a real bear of a job because they are longer than the stock springs. He said you have to put the lower fork in a vise and then the springs still extend a few inches out of the top tube, which makes it very hard to compress them while installing the top cap.
He also said the progressives will make the ride too harsh?????
Does this sound like your experience if you have installed progressive front fork springs yourself?
Thanks a lot for any information or advice you can give!
 

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Pwhoever
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He is wrong. Putting Progressive springs in a 1500 was a bear! The 1800 is way, way easier. They will still be under pressure but I do it without even using the vise. I just pull up on fork tube while pushing down on for cap and turn the fork tube untilthe fork cap bites. Then I can just turn the fork cap all the way down. I wait until I put forks back into triple tree to do the final tightening of the cap.

Progressive springs will be different than stock and it will feel firmer but not harsh. It will give you the feel that you have more control over your bike. And like you have already done, the anti dive valve is recommended to be disabled with this setup. I have been using Progressive springs for many years now and like them a lot. I know that Progressive recommends using 15w fork oil but I like the feel of 10w. JMHO.

One other thing, once you switch out the fork springs, you may feel that the rear suspension is now lacking. The good news is that Progressive makes a spring to replace the rear shock spring. You may want to consider that as well. Between the Progressive fork springs and the rear shock spring, you will see a dramatic difference in the feel of the bike. And it costs way less than a lot of the Traxxion suspension parts and you get a better ride.
 

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He is wrong. Putting Progressive springs in a 1500 was a bear! The 1800 is way, way easier. They will still be under pressure but I do t without even using the vise. I just pull up on fork tube while pushing down on for cap and turn it in.

Progressive springs will be different than stock and it will feel firmer but not harsh. It will give you the feel that you have more control over your bike. And like you have already done, the anti dive valve is recommended to be disabled with this setup. I have been using Progressive springs for many years now and like them a lot. I know that Progressive recommends using 15w fork oil but I like the feel of 10w. JMHO.

One other thing, once you switch out the fork springs, you may feel that the rear suspension is now lacking. The good news is that Progressive makes a spring to replace the rear shock spring. You may want to consider that as well. Between the Progressive fork springs and the rear shock spring, you will see a dramatic difference in the feel of the bike. And it costs way less than a lot of the Traxxion suspension parts and you get a better ride.
Thanks for that great information! Really helpful and now I've got to get to it and install them.
 

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Pwhoever
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Doing the forks yourself isnt too bad either. It can get a bit messy but not bad. Hopefully you have a service manual as it will help. There are a few threads here on how to do it. Just pay attention to the parts and their orientation. The right fork has a rod that screws into the fork cap and this makes it a little more challenging but isnt difficult. I made a seal driver out of a length of PVC pipe and a reducing coupler. The information is also available on this site too IIRC.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Doing the forks yourself isnt too bad either. It can get a bit messy but not bad. Hopefully you have a service manual as it will help. There are a few threads here on how to do it. Just pay attention to the parts and their orientation. The right fork has a rod that screws into the fork cap and this makes it a little more challenging but isnt difficult. I made a seal driver out of a length of PVC pipe and a reducing coupler. The information is also available on this site too IIRC.
Thank you, the video's really do help. And laying things out like you mentioned. When I find a shop with a workbench and vice where I can do the work, I will get on it. Thanks again for the advice!
 

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I stopped at the local honda shop and talked to a mechanic about installing the progressive springs.
He said it is a real bear of a job because they are longer than the stock springs. He said you have to put the lower fork in a vise and then the springs still extend a few inches out of the top tube, which makes it very hard to compress them while installing the top cap.
He also said the progressives will make the ride too harsh?????
Does this sound like your experience if you have installed progressive front fork springs yourself?
I wonder if he never did it or if he was trying to get the job? He either lied or is ignorant. I do it bare handed with the fork in 1 hand and the cap in the other.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I thought it would not be as difficult as he was making it out to be?
 

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I put the forks in the bike, had the front end blocked up. I stood on the pegs, pushed down on the ratchet with a long extension and socket. It was not easy, but I have done it a few times to get ride height correct.

I dropped the washer into the Bermuda triangle so I had to get another washer.

David
 

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Pwhoever
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I put the forks in the bike, had the front end blocked up. I stood on the pegs, pushed down on the ratchet with a long extension and socket. It was not easy, but I have done it a few times to get ride height correct.

I dropped the washer into the Bermuda triangle so I had to get another washer.

David
I too had similar experience with GL1500 forks and Progressive springs. I might add that I also needed to put a strap around my backside and attach to the handle bars to give me extra leverage. Learned a few new words doing it too. I actually hated opening up those forks because of what is needed to get the fork caps back on. But on the GL1800 forks, switching to the Progressive springs is no where near the difficulty. Like Dave0430 mentioned above, you could just do it holding on to the fork. I cant imagine anyone being able to do that on a 1500...
 

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These were not progressive springs, They were race tech linear springs. The ones that came out were progressive. I had about 2" to compress including ride height spacers. I wanted the Race Tech Emulators.

It was worth it. Bike rides MUCH better especially over square bumps like expansion joints and bridge approaches.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks so much for the encouragement and all the great advice. This is a great forum to help newbies like me. Appreciate everyone taking the time to make life easier for a fellow wing rider!
 
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