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I have read alot here about a noise filter for the alternator and how to test thats its working, but there have been no discriptions on where its located and how to test it. I can't seem to find anything in the service manuel either. I have found a cb noise filter available at sierra electronics but i haven't a clue as to wjere it goes. Any and all help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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hi the noise filter is fitted to the back side of the alternator small round cylinder but what you might have to do is fit an inline one to the power for the sat nav the cb has one fitted to the fuel pump on the gas tank and one fitted to the air pump under the seat just off hand how have you conected the sound from the sat nav to the bike
 

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Did you tie into the audio circuitry?

Voice prompts from your GPS wired into your headset audio?

If so, how exactly did you do that?
 

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Hi all, to wire the GPS into the headset for voice prompts just get a stereo rca jack that fits your gps and make sure it has enough length to reach down underneath the left pocket. Solder a 10 ohm resistor into the line and at the end that goes under the pocket stip it to bare wire. Under the left pocket disconnect the block and remove the mic wire. Reinsert both the mic wire and the new wire from the gps back into the block together and plug in and enjoy.

I still need to know if anyone can tell me how to test the filter.
 

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If you have the stock alternator and 30k miles since brush replacement Generally suspect the brushes as culprit for alternator whine in the headsets. Also find a lot of the capacitors broken at the mount on the alternator causing the problem..
 

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well I guess it time to pull the alternator and give it a once over...........at least it can't hurt (if I don't drop it)!
 

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been there, check all grounds, with helmet on,u will hear the whine go up n down as u check grounds, u may find that moveing them will help a lot, the battery ground is a bad place to go i found out, makes its worse. thats why u wear helmet as u make changes. i bought a inline power filter for the sat. radio. that helped a lot. i was told ground loop isolater does not get it done. also there is a ground 4 radio and cb in wire harness
 

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do u have any extra stuff added to bike, i put aan extra fuse box on mine, sat. radio, sat radio gave me whine, finally found problem, wired power filter from aux spot on bike fuse box on left side. filter then wire to hot side of extra fuse box, no more whine in intercom to helmet, me happy
 

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If you're getting alternator whine, it's more likely from a ground differential than anything else. The difference in resistance from the ground the GPS is using and the ground used by the radio means that the noise inherently on the 12 volt bus is injected directly into the audio.

Simplest and easiest way to get rid of this is a decoupling transformer, also known as a ground loop isolator. It goes in between the GPS and the bike's audio input. It will most likely completely eliminate the whine you're experiencing.

You can buy ground loop isolators online from car audio places for $30, but I just bought a simple audio transformer from Digikey. I used this one, and it cost $3.50.
 

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GSMacLean wrote:
If you're getting alternator whine, it's more likely from a ground differential than anything else. The difference in resistance from the ground the GPS is using and the ground used by the radio means that the noise inherently on the 12 volt bus is injected directly into the audio.

Simplest and easiest way to get rid of this is a decoupling transformer, also known as a ground loop isolator. It goes in between the GPS and the bike's audio input. It will most likely completely eliminate the whine you're experiencing.

You can buy ground loop isolators online from car audio places for $30, but I just bought a simple audio transformer from Digikey. I used this one, and it cost $3.50.
So GS how does that transformer work? I have been looking at GLI's for a while but they always have RCA cables on them and I need one without. Any info you can provide would be helpful.

Thanks,
Ty
 

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Here's a filter at Sierra Electronics I've been looking at. It just plugs inline with your gps, mpg players.


ELECTRICAL CONNECTION 3.5MM NOISE FILTER - ELIMINATES AUDIO GROUND LOOPS AND ALTERNATOR WHINE - "PLUG & PLAY"
Price: $29.95

http://www.sierra-mc.com/proddetail.asp?prod=EC-GRNDLP

 

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On the GL-1500's I quite often find the cause of the whine is the need for new brushes. Especially when everything has been ok and the problem just shows up.
 

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tybme wrote
So GS how does that transformer work? I have been looking at GLI's for a while but they always have RCA cables on them and I need one without. Any info you can provide would be helpful.

Thanks,
Ty
The GLI is basically just a transformer: It's two coils of wire, wrapped around a common (usually ferrite) core. The audio signal coming into one coil generates a minute magnetic field, which travels through the ferrite core, and induces the identical electrical signal in the second coil. That way the signal is passed through, without there being any actual electrical connection. The ground differential is what causes the whine, so because the ground is no longer connected between the devices (the transformer is in between them), there is no differential (or more accurately, there is infinite differential), and hence no alternator whine.

The $30 ground loop isolators consist a couple of transformers, with perhaps a metal shield around them, and a hefty markup.

The power lead noise filter is even simpler - a ferrite core, with the input wire wrapped around it. They're very simple to make. You can buy a ferrite core at Radio Shack for a couple of dollars. Wrap the +12V line around the core 5-10 times, and snap the core shut. It will dampen (absorb) high-frequency noise present on the +12V power supply lead.

However, the alternator whine that most people hear in audio systems cannot be killed with power lead noise chokes - it's almost always caused by ground loops.
 

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It's really sad how little I know - thanks for the tutorial!
 
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