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Here in the maritimes our summers average about 20 to 25 degrees C. About 75 to 85 F. I tend to get stuck in traffic on the Bedford Hwy frequently, would there be any advantage to going to a thicker oil. I now use 10w40.

Thanks

Grant
 

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Better off with the 20w in hot weather. Thin oil seems to make the older Wings very noisy in summer. Switch back to the thin oil in winter time.
 

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the nice thing about liqued cooled engines is that they quickly come up to an operating temp. but as been previously mentioned different brand oils handle ciscousity differently. However, you cannot go wrong with 20-50 in the summer
 

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If you think about it, the overlap in viscosity between 10W40 and 20W50 means that through most temperature ranges the oil will have the same viscosity. With your water cooled engine, the operating temperature of the innards is controlled to the point that after the engine is warmed up there isn't a lot of difference winter to summer if your thermostat is working properly. The lower viscosity basically just helps the starter turn over a cold engine, it also helps cold oil flow through the engine, but primarily it's to ease the load on the starter.
 

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Newfiewinger wrote:
Here in the maritimes our summers average about 20 to 25 degrees C. About 75 to 85 F. I tend to get stuck in traffic on the Bedford Hwy frequently, would there be any advantage to going to a thicker oil. I now use 10w40.
Grant, for summer usage either the 10W40 or 20W50 will be fine. Probably the greatest difference (if any noted at all) would be in engine & transmission noise. The base oil stock is a fair amount heavier on the 20W50 than the 10W40. Depending on the oil chosen you could also have a slightly better additive package on the 20W50 as that viscosity isn't to be used in emission compliant cars & trucks. Even the 10W40 isn't emission compliant from most oil vendors anymore so that could also contain better anti wear additives.

If you are using a lot of oil between changes now the 20W50 could help you lower the usage a little.

If you are going to be seeing any cooler mornings near the frost temps then the 20W50 isn't the right choice.

If you are looking for a little thicker oil with an extremely good additive package then you might look into a 15W40 type oil. The 15W40's areusually a diesel rated motor oilso have excellent anti wear & anti scuff additives & are based on a slightly heavier base stock. The 15W40 is a little more shear resistant also as the closer the high & low numbers on an oil (15W40 vs 10W40) usually the less polymers needed to meet the viscosity range, & usually the more polymers the more anoil can shear & eventually loose it's base viscosity.

I guess the best answer to you would be to try the 20W50 oil for a change or two. If you don't see (or hear) any noise difference,or the trans shifts a little harder when cold then switch back to the 10W40 oil. 10W40 should protect that engine very well in the temperature range you quoted above.

Twisty
 
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Another oil thread. Hey what about the tyres.? :whip:

:weightlifter::18red::weightlifter:
 

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As far as tires go, I recommend the "Round" ones !
 

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20W-50 is how I managed to burn out my starter and solenoid late last season when the temps dropped to single digits. In the peak of summer and/or if you are doing gas'n'go trips, go with the 20-50. As it cools as it does in Canada switch to the 40. I've even considered 10-30 when we have frosty mornings in the late fall. Not unusual to have a -6 in the morning but nice and dry and the temp gets to teens in the afternoon and not all that unbearable for riding. Hell if I can ride a sled in -20's, riding a scoot in the single digits isn't all that bad. Just cold weather starts with thick oil are hard on the starter which includes the solenoid.

Kyle
 

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In always ran with 10 w 40. It seemed I was having a harder and harder time finding no "energy conserving" oil. This year is my first year running with 15 w 40 although my wing is still in the garage slowly getting prepared, I love our canadian winters(Yamaha phazer). I read an interesting write-up about oils at http://www.yft.org/tex_vfr/tech/oil.htm check it out and see if it helps. jj
 

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Thanks for all the info and help, just trying to keep my baby around for a few more years.

Grant
 

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:waving::waving:Welcome to the Best Goldwing Site on the Internet, jj!:waving::waving:

Good article with lots of info, since itreinforces what I thought about lubricating oil, I hereby award you one mana! Naturally if it had disagreed with my preconceived notions I wouldn't!
 

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I run "5W40" Mobile 1 !

Bikes starts much better, Idles better etc !

So far so good !
 
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