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Christmas is coming and my bride is asking for my Christmas list. Of course what can be more appropriate than new tires for the 1200. I'm looking at the Michelin Commander 2. Not to start a S#!* storm about tires again, I would like to hear from the guys who are putting real miles on a 1200. Most of my riding will be one up and occasionally fully loaded. http://www.americanmototire.com seems to have a good selection. For your GL1200, what are you using and why do you like (or dislike them)?
 

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I've been using Pirellis for a while now (third set) and they work pretty well.

They are economical and don't display the handling hazards like the Dunlops and Metzlers.

Never had the Michellins on this bike.
 

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I've been using Pirellis for a while now (third set) and they work pretty well.

They are economical and don't display the handling hazards like the Dunlops and Metzlers.

Never had the Michellins on this bike.
Dennis, how many miles are you getting from a set? I was checking out the MT-66 Route.
 

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Dennis, how many miles are you getting from a set? I was checking out the MT-66 Route.
About 13 thousand. It's possible a less aggressive rider could get more, I suppose. Mileage is definitely on the short side.

What I like most about them is, even at the last of their life, they don't cause the slow-speed wobble you get from Dunnies and Metzlers. So realistically, they give safe service longer than those other brands.

The best riding and handling tire I've had on the bike has been the Bridgestone S-11 Spitfire. There was something wrong with the last run of 150/90 rear tires and they get splits in the tread about at 10k miles. It's a shame because they're otherwise superb tires.
 

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Hmm, a bit short on the tire life. I haven't gotten less than 20,000 miles on Metzlers or Dunlop Elite 3. The best, was a set of Metzlers that I got 28,000 on them. My ex-wife got 30,000 on one,(A Kawasaki Voyager) an Elite 2.

Now I'm curious. Why is everyone getting less mileage on their tires than me? Ya'all too heavy handed with the throttle? Standing on the brakes? Or are you changing them after the pimples wear off them? I wouldn't fool with a pair of Shinkos any more than fly. I used Ching Shin's for a bit, but it got old pulling them off at 8,000 miles. Last spring, I bought an Elite 2 off Amazon, and I expect at least two year on it. (20,000+) Aren't you putting max pressure in them? I see way too many riders going about on low, squatting tires. Or are you riding on sandpaper?

By the way, I have a Michelin Commander on my 86. I was told it would outlast my Metzlers, by a long way. I got 27,000 on my last set.
 

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going over 26K on a set of E3's,but my next set will be a set of Commander II's
 

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The original Bridgestone Spitfire series gave me 20 grand per set (2 sets) and never a handling woe.

Metzler ME88s were changed at 16K but were going into the wobble by 13. The wobble became so bad it could be felt with hands on the bars.

Dunlop Elite GTs. First set installed at 56,800 miles and replaced at 80,020 with the same. Those were changed at 105 K and, were they still available, I'd still be using those tires. They stuck good and handled very well. They developed a wobble as the rear squared off, but it was controllable.

Next came Bridgestone Spitfire S-11s This was the second gen of the Spitfire line and the 11 was the sport touring model. Oddly, the rear was replaced with around 10K on it but no notation as to why. Then both front and rear were replaced with Dunlop Elite 2s at 119k miles.

The Elite 2s were trash and replaced with only 15 grand on them. They worked like I remember Dunnies from my past. That is to say, they rode hard and couldn't be trusted to stick, when you really needed a tire to stick. And wore quickly.

Back to S-11s. They have a spotty availability history, but they worked. Very well.
They however had problems with the rear tire splitting. At 168,500 miles, after two rear, but four front tires, they were replaced.

Bridgestone Exedras were installed. First set, the rear tire developed a split, like a straight cut, an inch long, right in the center of the tire. It started leaking air, so I replaced the set at 185K. Second set, the rear developed the exact same split! Replaced the rear only at 198 grand, then at 207,800, both were replaced, with...

Bridgestone S-11s, again. That set lasted to 222,400 with no notes and replaced with the same. I do remember the edges of the front were bald before the center of the rear on those tires. Those were replaced at 236,700 miles with less than 15K. Reason; split rear. This time, in the tread.

Enter, Pirelli M66 Route. Not perfect, but pretty good, overall. The down side? Mileage. They were replaced at 249,900 miles with a tad over 13K on them.

So S-11s are back. Why? They are great tires, and I hoped Bridgestone would have gone through the bad batch of splitters and all would be well, again.
Not so, apparently. Records show the rear replaced, due to a split at 257,500, then, at 267,500 we're back to the Pirellis.

That set was replaced at 280K and we are now, at now. Or at the current time, if you wish. The current tires showing very little wear at the 5K mile mark.

Unless there's a problem with a tire, I always replace front and rear at the same time. Given their condition, some of the fronts I've thrown away might have lasted twice as long as the rear. Lots of folks do it that way, I know, but I like the feel of fresh rubber and question an aging tire's ability to perform correctly.

As for those who say they're getting such high miles from their tires, well, good for you. Can you show me the data?
I know that in rural Indiana, if you drive the speed limit and don't start and stop with vigor, much higher tire and fuel mileage numbers will be achieved. Here, in-town traffic often moves faster than your rural speed limits.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Looks like I will be going for the Michelin Commander II. Rear size 150/90-15 and front 130/90-16. The Pirelli MT-66 are the second pick. Thanks for your experiences.
 
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