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With my recent move, I am now riding to work more than ever.......:action:and I couldn't be happier............
well, almost..:(


Liquid sunshine is fairly abundant, and will be more so come the winter.

I have my leathers for summer riding, which is waterproof for about half an hour. But as you know it takes an age for leather to dry.
I have my Cordura suit which is great for those cooler days, and despite the spiel about Cordura, it's not as waterproof as they make out. (Go on, ask how Wannabe and I found THAT little gem out!!!)

I have a two piece RUKKA suit, which is warm and dry.
I have a one-piece rain suit which is big enough to fit over my one-piece chiller suit, which is warmer than the Rukka and possible a tad drier.
So body wise, you could say that I am covered.....:D

I have gloves in abundance that keep my hands nice and warm; and my boots do keep my feet warm. (even if it does mean two pairs of socks...lol)

The biggest gripe I have is trying to keep my hands and feet dry! :X
Waterproof gloves are dismally lacking in the waterproofing department, and the boots are not too far behind...IMO

So now I am looking at some sort of waterproof overboots and overgloves that I can pack for those just-in-case moments, when the sky turns the road into a river.

What I am asking for here, is pointers and advice; especially from those that actually have and use overboots and overgloves.

Phil.
 

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I have never solved the problem of hands. I have waterproof gloves, but I don't like them. I've tried rubber and vinyl inside and outside of leather, cotton and so on, and have never met a combination I could live with.

Mostly now I use my favourite leather gloves, and if my hands get cold and wet I turn the grip heaters on and live with it, I did 1400 km like that in June.

The hardest part was getting my soggy paws dry enough at a stop to roll a ***.
 

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In a word: Goretex (or is that two words?;))



Riding in the Puget Sound area where bikes won't run unless it's raining, I could never find anything that would keep my feet dry. Then I discovered goretex socks. Your boots will still get wet, but your feet will stay dry. Kind of like nitrous oxide at the dentist--doesn't stop the pain but you don't care...:cool:



Most outfitters will vend thermal lined or unlined Goretex socks. I vote for the lined socks--keeps you from feeling that your toes are getting wet (even though they aren't).



Good luck:leprechaun:
 

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I use Sno Seal on the gloves and boots too. One reason, I like the stuff, is it isn't greasy. It don't leave any residue on the the things you touch. It keeps my hands and feet dry. Don't do much for the cold though.
 

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I was on the ski patrol for many years at a small ski area in Oregon where it rained a lot. We used to wear what we called "rubber ducks" - Your basic yellow rubber rain suit. With them I wore those orange rubber gloves you find at any hardware store in a large enough size I could wear a cotton glove liner inside for warmth. These gloves worked well for skiing in the rain, but I think they would be too restrictive and "squishy" for a good grip on the throttle.

I plan to try "over-mitts" over my warm leather gloves, the kind that cross-country skiers wear, and load snow-seal on the back (top when riding) of the mitt.

Haven't figured out the dry foot part yet but I'm thinking gaiters, also like cross-country skiers wear (or used to wear!) also snow sealed. That still leaves the toes vulnerable but will close the opening between the foot and the pant leg to prevent cold air and water from blowing up your leg.
 

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I've been looking online most of the day for an answer to my question. :bash2:
Basically, there was a large choice of very little. :baffled:

The 'best' I could come up with are these :-

Boots -http://www.treds.com/
http://www.newenough.com/browse/view_product_images/733

Gloves - http://www.rain-off.com/prdt_dsptn.htm

From what I can gather from the sites, they are heavy protection, easy to use, offer warmth and dryness, and pack away small enough to carry with a rainsuit. :action:

Anyone have any thoughts or opinions on these (or have anything better)

Phil.
 

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might not be real pretty, but I use bread bags over my boots.... for my hands, I have found nothing yet
 

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Still working on something for my boots
 

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I have a pair of Wolverine Gore-Tex lined wellington style boots. Feet have never been wet with them so when you are looking for new boots I suggest Gore-Tex. As for overboots, I have never used them but am sure you would need something in a relatively thin material yet strong enough the shifter will not tear it.

For gloves I have a pair from Dick's sporting goods here, they too are Gore-Tex lined and keep my hands dry without failing yet. They are said to have insulation value comparable to 200 grams of thinsulate but they are not all that warm.

We went camping over the weekend and this morning it was raining when we were packing up. My hands were wet, and my shirt was damp when we suited up and hit the road. Shortly after I noticed that my hands had dried as had my shirt (gore-tex in the jacket an pants too). The ability of the gore-tex to wick moisture is simply amazing to me.
 
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