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This is a report of my father’s experience with the installation of a 1500 Goldwing “landing gear” kit which he purchased privately from a seller who lives interstate.

Any questions can be directed to me and I willcontact him for answers which I will post. He has written these words below..........

The original manufacturer has retired due to ill health (as far asI know) so I received a box of parts and limited information on how to make it all work. I spent two to three months in my spare time working out how to fit the hydraulics and electrical systems. Some vital parts were not supplied and had to be sourced from various companies that specialised in these parts. Major modification of the main mounting brackets had to be done due to the brackets needing to be mounted inboard of the S.E. adjustable pillion footboards. On the non S.E. models the brackets are mounted outboard of the footboards. The brackets supplied were for the non S.E. model.



It is manually operated not automatic like some commercially available kits are. The advantage here is that it is not automatically deployed down to an uneven road surface (incorrect camber etc.) which could be hazardous to an unprepared rider.



It can be used as little or as much as the rider wants and so doesn’t lose the “feel” of two wheels to the purist. It is useful if a rider wishes to reverse feet up into a parking space in a shopping centre car park without the need to be constantly balancing the bike.

I feel that from a safety point of view some sort of “lock out” needs to be incorporated to prevent accidental deployment above a given speed. My personal opinion is that the wheels should not be deployed above walking pace.

The unit is powered by a reversing hydraulic pump (Oildyne 108 – a common application with marine outboard motors) which is driven by a 12 volt DC motor. The pump operates in one direction to deploy the wheels to the operational (down) position. The pump reverses direction to retract the wheels. A fluid controller directs fluid to either end of the two double acting rams as required.









Incorporated in the fluid controller are two solenoid operated valves. When energised these valves, in addition to directing the fluid to the appropriate end of the rams, also incorporate a compensating function which allows fluid to travel from left to right rams and vice versa as required. An example would be where the bike is standing on terrain which is not horizontal. In other words if one wheel touches down first fluid is diverted to the other side ram. When the solenoids are de-energised a “hydraulic lock” situation exists which will prevent fluid from travelling from one ram to the other. With the wheels down this enables the bike to remain perpendicular regardless of the inclination of the road surface.



Hydraulic pressure switches (adjustable) limit the amount of pressure applied to either end of the rams to that required to operate the system satisfactorily being in effect” limit” switches.

A double pole double (not a typo) throw switch controls relays which supply power to the pump motor and the fluid controller solenoids. I have wired in parallel (not absolutely necessary) one latching switch and one momentary switch.

The motor/pump unit is mounted on a bracket which attaches to a ledge at the rear of the right pannier above the rear light assembly. A reinforcing plate is situated below this ledge.



The solenoids are wired in parallel with the reversing pump according to the manufacturers specifications. Extra relays to achieve a “lock out” situation prevent more than one function being in use at any given time. This is necessary when using the remote controlled relays. One motor performs two distinct functions. 1 - Wheels up. 2 - Wheels down.

The wheels illustrated use pneumatic tyres but I also have solid wheels that are smaller in diameter and less obvious to the onlooker. This would eliminate the need to monitor tyre pressure although the on-board compressor is useful in this instance.



At the moment I am trialling remote controlled relays instead of the hard wired toggle switches. The receiver is located inside the right pannier with the relays hard wired to the motor/pump unit and the fluid controller solenoid valves. A convenient place for the placement of the remote transmitter has yet to be determined.























To be continued................. :doh:
 

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Lovely write up and photographic enhancement Lloyd, well done to you and your dad. :claps:
 

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Silverfox wrote:
Lovely write up and photographic enhancement Lloyd, well done to you and your dad. :claps:
I told Liam I would put a YouTube video on but haven't done it yet.



Slack of me, I know :ssshh:
 

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LloydM wrote:
Silverfox wrote:
Lovely write up and photographic enhancement Lloyd, well done to you and your dad. :claps:
I told Liam I would put a YouTube video on but haven't done it yet.

 

Slack of me, I know  :ssshh:
Jump to it mate, no peace for the wicked. :badgrin::D
 

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Silverfox wrote:
LloydM wrote:
Silverfox wrote:
Lovely write up and photographic enhancement Lloyd, well done to you and your dad. :claps:
I told Liam I would put a YouTube video on but haven't done it yet.
Slack of me, I know :ssshh:
Jump to it mate, no peace for the wicked. :badgrin::D
It has only been 6 months Pete. :D

Normally I get onto these things straight away.

 

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6 months is straight away with me these days!! :bow:
 
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