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Having bought my 'wing late in the season I haven't spent much time on it. To get comfortable on the bike I have stayed on the back roads where the speeds are lower. I have yet to spend any time on the highway.

My question is "What can I expect when I am behind a large vehicle, passingone or being passed by one?" An aquaintance who has riden in the past says that thevortex from those large trucks can be downright dangerous. One of the reasons for purchasing a Goldwing in the first place was the size/weight of the bike but that was making the assumption that the larger, heavier touring bike can handle the turbulance better than the smaller cruisers. I encountered a fewstiff crosswinds while crossing overpasses and simply slowed down and leaned into the wind. Are traffic vortices handled the same way?

Happy New Year to all!:waving:
 

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You'll still get some buffeting, but it will vary with conditions. The Wing will certainly be better than with a smaller bike. Just stay loose and roll with the punches.
 

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Hi I have found from travelling on the motorways in Europe ,that when I am passing or being passed by a large truck ,I try a match its speed or near enough ,that way you dont get the huge wind pushing you away when you pass one ,,So if you have a truck in front and you are overtaking it ,just before you get to the frontof it drop you speed back a little and you will get by with little or no buffetting ..cheers Ciaran
 

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The bikes will take it with little problem, asaxelwik said stay loose. The worse effect is when approaching on coming trucks on 2 lane Hwys. Agood idea is when you are approaching, move as far to the right (In Canada) as you can while staying on the road. This will greatly minimize the "suck you under the wheels" feeling you would get otherwise. Andplease, DO NOT dilly dally when passing a truck. Weather passing on 2 or 4 lane get out, get by, get in front. Try not to drive along side for any longer then you have to. If there isn't enough room to get by them, stay behind them. Good idea for cage drivers too. If something goes wrong in front of a truck, odds are he will swerve, and that's not where you want to be.
 
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Hey mjpliv, :waving:Good to see that the learning is progressing well. :clapper:When following behind large vehicles keep a safe distance, :baffled:in the event of any emergency stop. :crying:When its safe to overtake do it and do it quickly, :stumped:and the reason is, :pumpkin:this is one of the most dangerous manoeuvresmade on our roads because it is carried out on the incorrect side. :whip: When meeting large vehicles always be prepared for some wind buffeting,dont slow down just hang loose and continue as normal. :weightlifter:As you know im not a "Guru" so this info might not be correct but it works for me. :clapper:

:coollep: :18red: :coollep:
 

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Here in NZ we have a lot of large trucks on the road and alot of 2 way roads. We also ride on the left.

Number 1 rule when passing a truck going the same direction as you is do it quickly and watch for the wind gust coming of the cab, but ride through it.

When a truck is oncoming once again expect a gust from the cab, maintain your position in your lane, and watch for impatient traffic behind the truck nosing into the centre of the road for a look for passing opportunities.

Don't let trucks prevent you from enjoying your ride.
 

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Hey Andrewl.

Nice to see a Kiwi on the forum, is Brent Saunders still on the Goldwing scene down there, I haven't heard from him in ages :baffled:
 

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mjpliv wrote:
Having bought my 'wing late in the season I haven't spent much time on it. To get comfortable on the bike I have stayed on the back roads where the speeds are lower. I have yet to spend any time on the highway.

My question is "What can I expect when I am behind a large vehicle, passingone or being passed by one?"
I've been pushed around by wind and turbulence more driving a 45' 25 ton tour bus than I have been on a Goldwing in similar conditions. For a real thrill you ought to try driving in high winds with my pickup and slide in camper.
 

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mpliv

When travelling at highway speed, it's impossible to throw down the Wing unless the tires actualy leave the ground. (*Talking airborne here*) My theory is the faster you hit the vortex the quicker you are through it, and it has to be a heck of a buffet to lift the wheels off the ground. You will notice the scary part is actualy the wind hitting your body, not the bike, which gives you that "Whoa!" effect. If you tuck down on top of your tank and have your head buried behind the wind shield, you will barley notice any movement on the bike at all. Plus it will protcect your face from being hit by any debris that may get kicked up. I have met large vehichles where it feels like a slap in the face, but like I said, tuck down and you won't even notice it.

In short, when meeting, or passing, tuck'n'go

Kyle

Little tricks are used to make life a little simplier!
 

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Thanks for all the responses. Mana to all!:D
 

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Something you learn quickly in sailing is that the faster you're going with a crosswind (they'd call it a beam reach) the more the relative wind across the deck comes forward. Same thing landing an airplane with a crosswind, it's easier in a faster plane since the higher forward speed makes the crosswind component less. The upshot of all this stuff is cruising at a good clip will lessen the crosswind effect. Of course this is not always the best strategy with a lot of traffic on the highway. Main thing is that the wind and the buffeting usually isn't all that much of a factor except it can get a bit tiring on a long run. Behind a large vehicle you usually can find a following distance that aviods a lot of buffetting. If you're suicidal of course you can avoid it completely and save gas by drafting.
 

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Sorry

I don't know Brent saunders but I am new to the "wing scene" So wouldn't put to much stock in my not knowing him.

Andrew
 
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