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Im curious, I bought my first Goldwing a couple weeks ago now, a 98 SE. I'm learning to ride it, its quite a different animal from my Intruder. Any tips on learning how to manage the size/weight, or other aspects of a Goldwing?
 

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Best advice I could offer is to take the MSF advanced rider course on the wing. Best investment you can make.
 

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Find a vacant parking lot and start putting in a lot of Slow Speed practice.

Figure 8s

Full stops w/o wavering to either side.
. opinions abound on left foot only down, to always put both feet down. I do both.

Practice straight ahead starts until you have NO wavering of the front wheel.

Practice starts to the left until you can do them w/o feeling like you will fall down. This one is helped a bunch by using foot brake to modulate forward speed, throttle at about 2500 rpm, and slipping the clutch. It is an oil bath clutch, it won't hurt it.

Practice starts turning to the right. Theoretically use the same exact procedure as the start off to the left, but it will take A LOT of practice to being to keep that right foot on the brake modulating forward speed while you are turning to the right. We all want to have that right foot free to put on the ground... but just remember IF you are moving forward, you can't put that foot on the ground anyway.

Nothing can take the place of a tremendous amount of practice at honing your skils.

I personally make every single stop a practice stop.

1) if straight ahead behind a vehicle, I slow it down 3 or 4 vehicles back and then creep up so slow to my stopping point, most folks would exclaim the bike is not moving.

2) Always have an Escape Route planned.

.... this is where you want to have a preplanned escape route to evade that cager on a cellphone behind you who is NOT going to stop. You WILL always have your hand on the throttle, the clutch held firmly to the handlebar, and always have the tranny in 1st gear.
_____ IF that cager don't stop, you will hit the throttle while releasing the clutch handle and BECAUSE your bike is already pointed at your Escape Route you will zoom away from that cager....

Okay, off my podium, but I have zoomed away from at least 2 cagers in recent experience.

I always say that I am driving/riding for 5 people.

. the guy in front
. the guy to the right
. the guy to the left
. the guy to the rear,

oh, and me..... I want to stay alive.
 

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Find a vacant parking lot and start putting in a lot of Slow Speed practice.

Figure 8s

Full stops w/o wavering to either side.
. opinions abound on left foot only down, to always put both feet down. I do both.

Practice straight ahead starts until you have NO wavering of the front wheel.

Practice starts to the left until you can do them w/o feeling like you will fall down. This one is helped a bunch by using foot brake to modulate forward speed, throttle at about 2500 rpm, and slipping the clutch. It is an oil bath clutch, it won't hurt it.

Practice starts turning to the right. Theoretically use the same exact procedure as the start off to the left, but it will take A LOT of practice to being to keep that right foot on the brake modulating forward speed while you are turning to the right. We all want to have that right foot free to put on the ground... but just remember IF you are moving forward, you can't put that foot on the ground anyway.

Nothing can take the place of a tremendous amount of practice at honing your skils.

I personally make every single stop a practice stop.

1) if straight ahead behind a vehicle, I slow it down 3 or 4 vehicles back and then creep up so slow to my stopping point, most folks would exclaim the bike is not moving.

2) Always have an Escape Route planned.

.... this is where you want to have a preplanned escape route to evade that cager on a cellphone behind you who is NOT going to stop. You WILL always have your hand on the throttle, the clutch held firmly to the handlebar, and always have the tranny in 1st gear.
_____ IF that cager don't stop, you will hit the throttle while releasing the clutch handle and BECAUSE your bike is already pointed at your Escape Route you will zoom away from that cager....

Okay, off my podium, but I have zoomed away from at least 2 cagers in recent experience.

I always say that I am driving/riding for 5 people.

. the guy in front
. the guy to the right
. the guy to the left
. the guy to the rear,

oh, and me..... I want to stay alive.

Excellent advice! :wink:
 

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+ 1 on the parking lot and developing the slow speed skills. When stopping keep your mind active for example not putting your foot down on a striped line or in a small puddle of oil (they can be very slick) not stopping and having to put your feet down in a gutter or a low point. Learn the proper way to pick it up off the ground becuase sooner or later it's going down. Google is your freind

Ivan
 

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Despite being a moderator, ASgl1500 gave you the best advice anyone could give you. That brake pedal trick comes in real handy at very slow speeds and you can drive it at slower than walking speed with that trick. One thing he didn't mention is to teach your rider that at slow speed she is not allowed to move at all, if she wants to move a finger, have her ask first. That way you won't get any surprises from weight being shifted two feet on top of your rear axle. A GW is a heavy bike on two narrow tires but with a little practise you'll be a champ at it...
 

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All great advice...for me the trick was getting use to the frame mounted fairing,and not being able to see everything turn... I was use to regular bikes...freaked me out a couple of times ... I will never ride like a pro but Im getting the hang of it....good luck
 

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Im curious, I bought my first Goldwing a couple weeks ago now, a 98 SE. I'm learning to ride it, its quite a different animal from my Intruder. Any tips on learning how to manage the size/weight, or other aspects of a Goldwing?
Find an empty parking lot, try straddling the lines or make up your own games.
Not great weather here now in Idaho for that:waving:
 

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I would say that AZgl1500 gave you great advise as did Craigmri...take the advanced riders MSF course...great way to spend a day...the classes are fun and wonderful information...I try to take it every spring just to hone up my skills before heading out on the open road...and a discount on my insurance...enjoy your ride...
 

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Spend the money for the Ride Like a Pro DVD.
 

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Im curious, I bought my first Goldwing a couple weeks ago now, a 98 SE. I'm learning to ride it, its quite a different animal from my Intruder. Any tips on learning how to manage the size/weight, or other aspects of a Goldwing?
My 2cents:
-The wing is very nimble, and most-controllable, above 20mph... Hence try to maintain a minimum speed above that... 25-35mph is perfect for most twisties.
-When stopping, lower one foot at a time (hanging down, but not touching ground) during the last 20ft or so prior to the stop (eg When bike is most unstable), then lower both feet simultaneously (the last ~1/2") at the final stop, coordinated with use of the front brake. Doing this will prevent inducing any large body (leg) movements during that last (slow speed) transition to a stop, and allow you to come to a very smooth landing.
-When stopped, keep both feet on the ground, especially if you have a passenger on board, or with wind present. The wing is considerably heavy, hence with only one foot down, it's easy to lose control.
-Do not use the Reverse as a parking brake... it does not prevent the bike from rolling forward, off the stand.
-Do not use the Reverse at all, if possible... it's very common to later find that the bike won't start, due to a stuck reverse switch (which prevents the neutral light from coming On)
-Do not exceed 65 -70mph, for best fuel economy.
-Do not expect the wing to Shift Quickly... it's a clunky slow-shifting transmission, made for cruising.
 
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