Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

21 - 33 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
Also, slipping the clutch and dragging the foot brake helps alot for low speed maneuvering.
Yep - works good. I've been riding on the street for 30 years, all self taught how to stuff. Last spring I attended a weekend long Beginner Rider Safety Course with my 18 yo Son. We learned a lot that weekend and was reminded of stuff I'd forgotten too. :smile2:


.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
727 Posts
Don't forget the safety aspects of having a co-rider.

First, your co-rider is another set of eyes to watch for traffic problems and other road hazards. (This is even more important now days with the majority of car drivers being cell phone distracted drivers.)

Second, your co-rider is your fail-safe backup pilot in the case you become incapacitated on the front seat.

The "Incapacitated Rider" drill is taught in the co-rider class at GWRRA functions.

Basically, they teach the co-rider what to do to take control of the bike and bring it to a safe stop should the rider become incapacitated for whatever reason.

Should the rider become incapacitated while underway, the drill goes like this:

1. Co-rider stands up on their foot pegs/floorboards and then stretches out forward pushing the rider down against the top of the bike with their body to keep them from falling off the bike. (Continue to lay on top of the rider to hold them in place through the entire procedure.)

2. At the same time, the co-rider grabs both hand grips and continues to steer the bike and keep it upright and on a safe course.

3. The co-rider, now the pilot, uses the clutch, the throttle and the front brake lever to control the bike while looking ahead for a safe place on the side of the road to pull over and stop the bike.

4. The co-rider slows the bike and steers for the spot chosen to safely stop.

5. Continue to slow, and when at the safe stopping location, pull in the clutch and use the front brake to bring the bike to a full stop.

6. Quickly flip the engine "kill switch" to OFF and allow the bike to slowly tip over sideways and onto the engine guard bars, etc. Try to keep feet from getting pinned under the bike when it tips over. (Note that if the bike has a tip-over switch, it will turn itself off on its own.)

7. Get off the bike, check the rider and render aid, then call 911 for help. Flag down those passing by to assist if they can.

That's the drill. Really every co-rider should know what to do if this should happen.

Before you ask, no, they can't reach the shift lever to change gears, but there is no need to shift gears to accomplish this procedure.

And, yes, if your co-rider is not familiar with standard shift and a clutch, you need to give them a lesson. They really don't have to be expert at it at all, but they need to know the basics of using a clutch. Clutch in - bike slows, clutch out - bike goes!

***
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Wow, I had never thought of that situation. I'm screwed- my wife will be my primary co-pilot and I wouldn't trust her for ANY of that stuff. I don't think I could get her to even listen to that if I sat her down in the kitchen.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
727 Posts
Wow, I had never thought of that situation. I'm screwed- my wife will be my primary co-pilot and I wouldn't trust her for ANY of that stuff. I don't think I could get her to even listen to that if I sat her down in the kitchen.
You will be amazed at what people can and will do when they "have to". I'll bet your wife would be glad she at least read this procedure and knew what to do should she ever have to do it.

When the chips are down, the ladies will step up and get it done!

***
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
I'll show it to her for sure. I'll also be talking about it with other riders
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
When we're drinkin', my wife usually passes ou...er, uh, becomes incapacitated, before I do.
I've seen that happen at my house too, it happens on a lawn chair by the fire pit. Occasionally it's the back seat of the boat tho. :grin3:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
57,702 Posts
Before you go anywhere I'd have her practice getting on and off while you're stationary and you can get the feel of how she is moving her weight.. Seems like everyone has their on way, driver first passenger first.. Take a few turns through a parking lot so she can get the feel of the bike swaying back and forth.. You should explain you have to ride as one.. She can't fight the bike in turns if she thinks it's going down.. Once she get comfortable back there the rest will come at her pace.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Before you go anywhere I'd have her practice getting on and off while you're stationary and you can get the feel of how she is moving her weight.. Seems like everyone has their on way, driver first passenger first.. Take a few turns through a parking lot so she can get the feel of the bike swaying back and forth.. You should explain you have to ride as one.. She can't fight the bike in turns if she thinks it's going down.. Once she get comfortable back there the rest will come at her pace.....
She's been my co-pilot for almost 10 years. This 98 GL1500 SE is our first 'Wing'. She knows how to be a good "pillionette" (maybe I just coined a word??) She flows with the bike like it's her second nature, she has tapped me gently or given me a squeeze when she is uncomfortable with a corner I have taken or a maneuver I have made , and reminds me of it later. - BUT , now we have Helmet communicators.. could be an instant "game changer" in how soon I know about her discomfort with what I have done- -- accept, I'm 10 years older now and we are on our Wing, not on the Ninja ZX9R, ZX6R,BMW R1100RT ect.. It was on OUR Goldwing.

That first ride on the wing together was only 30 miles long and it was very memorable for us both - For her - She was feeling truly comfortable and secure and for me I was happy to be the provider of it. ( Happy wife = happy life )


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
463 Posts
As some of you know I am in my infancy in the Goldwing class of bikes. Previously I rode a '00 BMW R1100RT and a slew of sport bikes. I rode the BMW for 6 years and my wife never rode more than an hour long trip on it.
My wife is currently laid up with a broken ankle and I'd like to give her some "bike talk" to think about.

She has never ridden on a Goldwing, (Broke her ankle the day I got it home).

I have bike/vacation plans forming in my head and directed her to "check out the Blue Ridge Parkway" on line today.

What I'd like her to hear from "The Back Seat" is.. What DO you DO back there for hours at a time?
I want her to know how the comfort is, can she take pictures as we ride, can she easily drink a cup of coffee?

We are helmet wearing riders and have communicators..
My wife sleeps. Lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I like the incapacitated rider drill - a lot. It is really useful to discuss this sort of thing, and if you don't think your partner is incapable of doing it, you're probably wrong. Once they have a plan to use in an emergency, it is much easier. I am reminded of a guy I used to work with many years ago. In the second World War he was a young navigator in an RAF Blenheim bomber in a mission over Germany when his pilot was killed. He'd never flown a plane, or even had any tuition, but he took over and managed to fly back to the UK to land safely, saving the lives of the rest of the crew. He received a well-deserved DFC (Distinguished Flying Cross) for his efforts. You never know what people are capable of until you put them in a hole.
 

·
(Rick Sheeley GWRRA)
Joined
·
659 Posts
Two words: cup holders....
 
21 - 33 of 33 Posts
Top