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weird windshield fix

I have an 89 Pacific Coast for sale. Last year I had a for sale sign taped on the inside of the windshield. It was the blue painters tape. When I removed the sign, the tape removed some kind of clear coating on the inside of the shield. It looked a whole lot better so I removed the windshield and used tape on the inside to clean the whole thing. It looks 100% better!! Who knew?

What was even more interesting, is duct tape did not remove it!


Rayjoe
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I have an 89 Pacific Coast for sale. Last year I had a for sale sign taped on the inside of the windshield. It was the blue painters tape. When I removed the sign, the tape removed some kind of clear coating on the inside of the shield. It looked a whole lot better so I removed the windshield and used tape on the inside to clean the whole thing. It looks 100% better!! Who knew?

What was even more interesting, is duct tape did not remove it!


Rayjoe

That's certainly worth a try. Thanks.
 

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I used to be a spray painter but also subcontracted to a company which supplied polycarb stuff. They needed me to repair any scratches on the material prior to delivery. To get it looking like new, the procedure is quite simple but will take some elbow grease.

In your case, I would start by wet hand sanding with maybe 500 grit (grit selection is a black art so don't hold me to it). Keep the part squeaky clean ie no sand or debris on the surface.
Keep a rubber squeegee handy to quickly dry your work to check your progress.
When you think you've removed all the deep scratches (and replaced them with 500 grit scratches) move up to maybe 800 grit.
Rinse and repeat.
Then maybe 1200 and up higher if you feel like it.
Then move to rubbing compounds; 2 different coarseness-es, applied wet.
Then polish. I used to use exclusively Meguiers Machine Glaze. Its awesome stuff. First polish with a soft cloth (I've never used a polishing machine on polycarb... it may work but I've never used one).
Final polish with Machine Glaze on a cotton wool pad. Takes forever but if you didn't skimp on the preceding steps, it should look like new.
I would estimate 5 hours or so to do a windshield. Maybe more, depends on what you're after.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I tried it once and bought some rather expensive Clear coat with catalyst in a rattle can. Failed miserably. Don't go by me. I have never been good at any kind of painting etc. I tend to be too impatient and nervous.

After some polishing and really looking looking at the finish, I see it is much thicker than OEM and has several runs in it. Is this some of your work? >:)
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Anyway, the old finish wasn't coming off, even with 320 grit, and the sanding machine won't work on the concave surface, so, I have resorted to manual labor and 150 grit to start...

...This may take a while.
 

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Dennis, you hit my "motivation" button with this thread. I had parked my '91 GL1500 8-10 years ago out in the elements, so I watched the windshield get worse and worse with each passing day, month, year. The deteriorating condition of the windshield was the trigger that made me get off my butt and get it "roadworthy" again. I'm happy to have the beast up and running again but I was unhappy that I didn't try to repair/restore the original windshield.

It was one of the first things I replaced when I got the beast back on the road. I've ordered a 3M kit as seen in the video in the hopes that it'll work.
In the meantime though, I decided to try the toothpaste method.

I gathered a tube of Arm&Hammer toothpaste for $3 (the one with baking soda and Peroxide), a foam "applicator", a spray bottle with water (free), and my old Ronson Ultra Shine electric shoe polisher with terry-cloth pad/disc that I used on my motor-boots "back-in-the-day". It spins at 300-400 rpm (i think).

The first pic is the original windshield as it looked when I took it off in May '17. http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

The second pic is the results of the "toothpaste" on the left side, nothing done to the right side.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

The third pic is the windshield sitting on its side with the left side on top, right side on bottom.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

The last one it the windshield sitting on its side with the RIGHT side on top and the left side on bottom.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

The experiment was a partial success, , , The improvement is very noticeable but it is NOT roadworthy IMHO. Maybe more polishing/buffing would work, , , ,but I'll wait for the 3M kit and try it on the right side for a comparison.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Yeah, I tried the toothpaste on my headlight a couple years ago. A waste of time in my opinion. I used a dab of McGuires and went five minutes with the Harbor Freight buffer...

Done.

Your windshield looks like it could be brought back pretty easily. Those 3M kits are intended for doing 1½ to 2 square feet of surface so you'll probably need to get some additional stuff.

After a couple hours of sanding with 150 grit, I'm still not done with the initial job of getting the coating off. So yesterday I dropped into Home Depot and bought a 5 inch sanding pad for the drill. We'll see if that can save some time.
 

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The toothpaste might work well on a "less oxidized" lens/windshield as proven by the improvement on my useless one, but I agree it didn't make the windshield roadworthy. At $27 bucks a pop for the 3M kit, I don't see myself buying more. I'll have to do a better job of not letting the windshield get in the same condition as before.

I'll let you know the results of the "kit" restoration when its done.

Good luck with yours, , , ,
 

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Since the "toothpaste" method was NOT roadworthy IMHO, I decided to use the 3M kit on that half first to see if it improved the appearance. I did NOT improve the other side in any way. The results were definately "roadworthy" on the side with the toothpaste method but it is not close enough to the "new" windshield for me to change em out. This older windshield will serve as a very decent "back-up" if something happens to my current windshield. It was nice to know that the original could be saved and is still worth keeping.

I have absolutely NO IDEA why or how pics 2 and 3 got uploaded upside-down, , , sorry I'm not sure how to "fix" that.

First picture is the original condition the day I removed it from the bike.
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

The second picture is half the windshield done with the toothpaste method, (not roadworthy BUT, VERY much improved)

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

The third picture is the 3M method done on the toothpaste method side, (Roadworthy BUT, not enough to motivate me to change from my current windshield)

http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

I used half of the "supplies" that came with the "kit" to do half the windshield so I should be able to complete the project on the other half of the windshield.
All-In-All, , this experiment gave decent results but only 1 thumbs up, , , (not two). Maybe I was expecting too much from a 27 yr old hunk of Lexan/polycarbonate.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
That's actually pretty impressive.

My project isn't going as well. I doubt the screen will ever be usable.

I'm sanding by hand and so far have worked my way up to 600 grit paper. I have to go get finer stuff, but the work involved has been considerable, especially for a test. But whatever was put on the plastic, as a clear-coat, seems to have damaged the Lexan, and hours of hand sanding with 150, 220, 320 and 600 grit paper hasn't cleared the surface of the "run marks".
 

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I appreciate the help John, , ,how'd you get rid of the darn annoying "picture link" crud on them?? Am I doing something wrong when I upload them? I'd rather NOT have the link stuff listed in my posts.

Dennis, sounds like you're on the right track, the 800 grit and 3000 grit were the final steps to make the surface glass smooth. I already had rubbing compound and polish so I ordered the one without that stuff to save a few bucks. The rubbing compound and the polish steps REALLY cleaned up the surface to the point you see in the pictures. You might try the areas away from the "run marks" to see if the windshield will come back to life, to better judge how much more effort you put into it, (just a thought).
 

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my previous bike had a crack in the dash so i decided to go ahead and fix it myself, the damage was actually in the center piece of the dash which had the tach clock and the sides had clear lcd displays. well in the process of replacing the center piece i damaged the surface on one of the sides. i was really angry at myself because i thought that i actually made it worse.

i ended up sanding until the damage was not longer visible, then went to higher grit until i reached the 2500 grit, then polished using paint polish paste and it ended up looking like brand new, no clear coat needed.

so i guess this can be done to the windshield.
 

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The windshield "project" is completed!! The 3M kit process, followed with my rubbing compound/polishing compound resulted in a restored Lexan windshield.

Picture is the completed windshield
http://www.goldwingfacts.com/forums/images/GoldWingFacts/attach/jpg.gif

This should be half toothpaste method, and half UNTOUCHED as it came off the bike,


Next is the 3M method on the toothpaste side and nothing on the untouched side,


FINAL RESULTS:


SUCCESS!!!!
 

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Dennis,

In your opinion/experience the 3M kit will clean up the headlights on a car?
Our Pontiac Vibe is getting those fuzzy crazed appearance and the lights don't project as well as they did when new.
 

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ABSOLUTELY !!

One kit would do both headlight lenses.

You'll need;
1. A 3/8 drill (near the 1000rpm style)
2. A spray bottle for water "spritzing".
3. small container/tube of rubbing compound for final step to see crystal clear lense
**Lastly, you should put a coat of a decent "carnuba" wax on the lense for UV protection

**To make the sandpaper grits last longer, I did a "WET SANDING" with each of the steps. You need only a small amount of pressure, , , let the sander do the work
Your work will look "hazy" for each of the sanding phases, as the lens gets progressively smoother. The rubbing compound/polishing/buffing compound is the REAL shocker at the final step. Like with shoe polishing, work that compound all the way to the end, don't wipe it off too early wet, let the polish come to a shine. You're only looking for an evenly looking haze with the sandpaper, , the compound will bring the shine.
 
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