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I have a GL1500, but also have two bad knees. The bike is great, but the knees are really a pain should the bike find itself on its side, which it has a few times.



The problem is with the bad knees it is almost impossible to gain enough leverage to lift the bike. Ouch!!!



Is there some kind of small, flat, light weight jack that can be used to assist in lifting??



Thank you, Ray
 

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:waving:Welcome and Hello . Here is a link to a video of lifting technique :?Picking up a Goldwing?? - YouTube . There are a couple videoes at You Tube . I understand though with your knee problems even this lift method may not work or be safe/comfortable to you .



As to another way for lifting here is one thats a little slow but may work for you ,
This is taken from a post by member Hewy

"I happen to be one of the more clutzy riders when it comes to holding up my bike. I seem to lose my footing and the bike slowly rolls over. I can usually right it again but alone this is no easy task.

What I have tried, with success, is putting a deflated basketball under a crash bar and inflating it with a 12 volt compressor. It doesn't lift it completely but lifts it high enough so you don't throw your back out trying to get the bike upright again. It's embarrassing enough to tip over and more so when some little old lady offers to help you pick the bike up!


Any one else ever tried this or have a better way?
:?








____________________"
Hewy
 

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just grab that baby by the horns and give her a yank either it'll stand up or you'll fall down either way it sure is a experience
 

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Once upon a time I heard a story about some kind of training wheel device for the GL1500 that won't let it drop all the way down. I don't know how well that would work, or if it even exists, but it's probably worth looking into.

I have arthritis in my knees and hips and I have a bad back, I've dropped my 1200 4 times now, first two times I was in my garage and just called my brother in law to help me get it back up, the other two times were on the road, I just had to suck it up and lift it, I was hurting for two days after that, thank god for good engine guards.

But when they stay up on two wheels they sure are fun bikes. :cheesygrin:
 

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I have never dropped a street bike....yet, but I have picked up a few. Not long ago I helped a guy pick up his Yamaha Roadstar. That sucker was HEAVY. I would never have believed such a small bike (compared to a Goldwing) would have been so heavy, but of course a lot of the Goldwing's size is plastic.

I also picked up my boss's 1500 Goldwing when I pulled into the shop and found it had fallen over. I called him and he asked me to pick it up. It did not fall completely over, more like halfway over, and was resting on the case guards. It was a lot easier for me to pick it up alone than it was to help that guy pick up his Roadstar that was laying flat on it's side.

I also have bad knees, a bad back, and arthritis. The bad knees and bad back are almost certainly due to decades of carrying heavy stuff, including A/C compressors, up and down ladders all day. It's definitely time to start looking for a new occupation, just don't know what yet.
 

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As you no doubt know by now, the GoldWing will generally lay only so far over, somewhere near 40-45 degrees thanks to low center of gravity / protection bars.

1a) If on Right side down, turn motor off, put transmission in 1st gear, and extend sidestand now (you will be on wrong side to do it later)

1b) If on Left side down, turn motor off, put transmission in 1st gear. (you cannot put sidestand down, but you will be able to in a moment)

2) Back up to bike placing your butt in seat, knees bent, you are facing awayfrom side of bike now.

3) With the hand nearest to rear of bike, grab lower passenger handhold.

4) With the hand nearest front of bike, grab lowest handlebar grip and pull up 'till fork is turned to stop.

5) Now backup, straightening legs, holding lower passenger handhold and lower grip, the bike will set up easier than you ever imagined.

... If on right side of bike, gently ease back till it sets on previously extended sidestand.

... If on left side, use heel of right shoe to extend sidestand while still holding bike up.

6) Practice a couple times on pad or out in your yard (grass is soft).

It works, even if you have some problems with the knees. If severe problems with knees, ... a Trike will alleviate that concern and if you have a co-rider .... they'll enjoy the ride more worrying about your knees less.

Just sayin' ..... :waving:

 

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Very well written and understood. I may have to trial this method to be sure!
 

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Now try it on loose sand and gravel or wet grass for a fun time.
 

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I do remember several years ago when I had been working on the bike, and drinking large quantities of scotch I finallyfinished the bike. I got on the thing and fired it up with the intention of riding it back up to the house. On the turn at the fenceI lost control in the slippery grass and it tumbled to the left. It made my knee do things for which it was not designed. I picked the bike up but took a half an hour to make it to the back of my pharmacy to buy an ace bandage to wrap it the following morning.



I swear it had nothing to do with the scotch.
 

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CrystalPistol wrote:
As you no doubt know by now, the GoldWing will generally lay only so far over, somewhere near 40-45 degrees thanks to low center of gravity / protection bars.

1a) If on Right side down, turn motor off, put transmission in 1st gear, and extend sidestand now (you will be on wrong side to do it later)

1b) If on Left side down, turn motor off, put transmission in 1st gear. (you cannot put sidestand down, but you will be able to in a moment)

2) Back up to bike placing your butt in seat, knees bent, you are facing awayfrom side of bike now.

3) With the hand nearest to rear of bike, grab lower passenger handhold.

4) With the hand nearest front of bike, grab lowest handlebar grip and pull up 'till fork is turned to stop.

5) Now backup, straightening legs, holding lower passenger handhold and lower grip, the bike will set up easier than you ever imagined.

... If on right side of bike, gently ease back till it sets on previously extended sidestand.

... If on left side, use heel of right shoe to extend sidestand while still holding bike up.

6) Practice a couple times on pad or out in your yard (grass is soft).

It works, even if you have some problems with the knees. If severe problems with knees, ... a Trike will alleviate that concern and if you have a co-rider .... they'll enjoy the ride more worrying about your knees less.

Just sayin' ..... :waving:
I've used this method once or twice :sadguy:, and It works very well. really easy to put the bike back up. Not as much stress on your knees as you would think, probably even less stress than running.
 

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I carry a small hydraulic bottle jack for which I made an extension that fits the frame tube just under the rear of the tank after taking the side cover off. Raises the bike enough to right it easily. I am a guy with a gimpy back and also not as strong as I once was due to age. This works for me. The jack is a 2 ton model and doesn't weigh much. Don't want to go the trike way if I can avoid it.
Bobby
 

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These bikes are the biggest brutes on the road .
At 800+ lbs. i am saving my bad knees by carrying a AAA or CAA card with me at all times .
I suggest you do same.
 

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Bobby, judging from your list of bikes, you're a bit of a motorcyclist. Trikes are really very cool. There's no shame in riding a trike or sidehack. I had friend who was over at someone's house one night and they brought out the Volkswagen trike. My impaired friend decided he wanted to take it around the block. At the first stop he put his foot out as he slowed. His foot grabbed the road and went under the tire which yanked him out of the seat and he was jerked off the thing and the tire ran over his hips and abdomen. Beat up and bruised, it's the last time he ever rode a trike.
 

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I'd just leave it lay and go get an 1800:ROFL:
 

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lolSethan12, What good would an 1800 do you? Does it have a crane device to lift your bike?
Bobby
 

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It should have some kind of built in lifting device, if something as simple as a basketball would work. I mean they did put an airbag on it.
 

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The basketball idea sounds interesting, but would it have enough lifting power? As for a built-in lift, the Indy cars have four little jacks built under them to lift the car to facilitate tire changes. This would work but would be very expensive.
Bobby
 
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