Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Car drivers are immune to lighting. Motorcyclist are not.
I, like most of us, got caught riding into a lighting storm trying to find shelter.
I knew the danger is out-there but not much I could do.

In the last few days we had torrential rain coming down along with thunder and lighting.. It is welcomed since we need our aquifer refilled.

This tragedy happened within a few miles from my house

May the rider rest in peace.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/florida-motorcyclist-killed-by-lightning-strike-police
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
25,366 Posts
I have heard of that once before, in Kansas I think. I have ridden in storms but only when there was nowhere to take shelter. I worry about hail more than lightning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
I have heard of lightning striking the antenna,which to me is just a lightning rod,I have been known to fold mine down when there’s no cover like Dave said,which I think is wise decision,not in rain but lightning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
Somewhere buried in the forum is a clip of what I recall was a BMW rider struck in the helmet. He was amazingly lucky, and was able to pull to the side and put the side stand down. He didn't remember much but survived. That was the day I stopped riding in lightning storms!

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9 Posts
If your lucky enough to find a bridge to take shelter under don't sit on the guide wire waiting for the storm to pass. Guy I worked with did that and got what he called an electric enema, he didn't get hurt but said he never stood up so fast in his life.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
22,195 Posts
Like Dave said, hail is just as bad, maybe worse, than lightning. It not only beats you senseless, it covers the roadway with tiny marbles. Or, in some cases, big marbles.

Around here the hail doesn't get too big, but in the mid west it can be big enough that a direct hit could be as lethal as a lightning strike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,629 Posts
I recall in Az while I lived there people were struck by lightning and there was no storm in the area,there’s so much ore in the ground that attracts lightning that one never knows where it might strike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
261 Posts
I've wondered about lightning being a danger motorcycle riders. I never heard of it happening until the news article from Florida. My wife and I ride for pleasure and the pure fun of it. When we are on the road, I'll look at the radar map for the area will be riding. If the weather looks nasty, we'll change the route or stay where we are another day. Rain is ok but lightning hitting all around you takes the fun out of the ride.
 

·
Magic Moderator
Joined
·
4,482 Posts
Having lived in Florida I hated getting caught out in a storm. I'm not a fan of lightening as it is, all I have to hear is thunder in the distance and off goes the computer and internet, stuff gets unplugged. A week ago a storm came through Lovington and the strike was close by it took out the transformer on the pole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
I had to explain to my co workers it's not rubber tires protecting occupants in a car struck by lightning, it's the metal frame and body around them creating a faraday cage. I said think of lightning jumping 20,000 feet from could to ground... Is it logical to think 6 inches of wet or dry rubber tire is going to help? Seriously tires have nothing to do with it, to that kind of voltage they're electrically none existent. Now put metal arch front to back over there too of you and the bike and some means to keep it constantly in contact with the ground you'd look wierd but would probably be protected (you'd still have to change your pants). My said boat is bonded that way and it's saved my fanny more than once.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
58,762 Posts
I have ridden through a lot of rain and never given Lightning much thought, except that if it got started and was close, I would stop and get off.


If it is raining when I get up and wanted to go ride, I just don't, never have.
But, if I am trying to get home, I always just kept going, because I was staying dry behind that big fairing and windshield.


That has changed now, I am getting off, and riding another day.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,825 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I copied this from the weather channel
Last year, 20 people were killed by lightning strikes, according to the National Weather Service. More than a third of those deaths occurred in Florida.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
704 Posts
I remember seeing on the News about 20 yrs ago a motorcyclist was killed by lightning on the Boulder Turnpike (highway between Denver and Boulder). A direct hit, it blasted a 1 foot diameter hole in the concrete pavement. They figure the rider was already dead even before he hit the concrete median barrier! At least he never knew what hit him!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
While in the fire company many years ago during a particularly bad storm we were out doing traffic control with one of the trucks and were basically standing around making sure cars went around an area where wires were down when lightning struck the pole right next to the fire truck. It literally blew a guy under the truck and out the other side! Thankfully he was not hurt. The chief immediately told us to pack it up throw cones out and get out of there. Back then the trucks were not fully enclosed and you rode on the back. And by "throw cones out he meant just that, thrown from the truck on the move!"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I wonder how many electric modules are fried each year. I know of 5 on one truck that got roasted during a storm/lightning strike. F350 with V10 would still start and run on 5 cylinders, but every warning light was on.
I didnt like the look of a storm, left truck running and went inside, was less than 50yds away when it struck the truck.


I try to look for drive through banks, or car washes, as an escape from rain. Of course if you're in BFE, shelter is scarce.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,605 Posts
Once maybe 10-12 years ago, leading a group ride coming home on Blue Ridge Parkway after a weekend spent in western NC. We had detoured off Parkway for lunch in Floyd, and afterwards, we rode 221 north to aim to get back on BRP north of Check, we stopped at wide spot at Check to suit up as clouds darkened. We pushed on, got on BRP to head down Mtns towards Roanoke, the sky opened up.

We had slowed a lot, but still visability was bad. As I passed a overlook on my left, I suggested some pull in to wait it out, they did except one couple behind us, who were too close to me for me to slow to get that overlook, so I led them and we went to next overlook. We had a choice, get under trees or wait it out. We stayed in open. It was raining buckets, then a huge bolt of lightening hit just a few yards away off overlook, air felt funny, we all felt vibrations, then just as I really got worried, rain stopped like a faucet shutoff.

The others soon came down to our overlook, we all rode to overlook on section around Roanoke at Frontier museum, it was hot then. I was so pleased, no one had a spill, all were safe. But we all needed a break and shed our rain suits.

Was one of two really worrying rides on BRP over the years.






Back in the '70s, I worked some at a Kayo station on Rt 29 south of Lynchburg. We had a porch with drink boxes on it. I was standing there with a big truck driver as we were waiting for rain to stop so could fill his truck's tanks. Nearest lanes of 29 were NB lanes, there was a bridge that ended just as the station lot started, and on that bridge rail was a big steel ball ending the rail. As we stood there, big bolt of lightening shot up from that steel ball, ground shook, and I realized the truck driver was no longer standing beside me. Turned, he was on concrete trying to crawl under the drink boxes. He was OK, but a nervous wreck. Rain stopped soon then too.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top