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What are your thoughts on storing a bike for six months in the summer.

Would it be better to fill the fuel tank full with stabilizer/seafoam or drain the tank completely? I am thinking of topping it off and draining in fear of rust.

I am not too worried about the motor oil, but what are your thoughts about fogging the cylinders with oil or PE oil. Sort of like diesel engines being processed before they go into a storage container.

Battery will be removed.
 

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I would put in some Sea Foam, and then fill the tank to the brim to preclude condensation forming on the tank walls.

That way, no rust.
 

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I wouldn't worry about any special treatment to the cylinders, as we store them for that long up here during the winters without any special treatment.

Agree with John concerning the fuel tank



Dusty
 

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Agree. Some sort of fuel stabilizer and fill the tank.
 

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Rust needs 2 ingredients, air and moisture. Fill to the brim with gas and you deprive rust a chance to start.

Never leave it empty. I had a tank stored for a few years empty. Perfectly good tank now has a number of pinholes from rusting from the inside out.
 

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I always fog the cylinders of my outboard and cycle for long term storage. I use the mercury outboard fogging stuff in the spray can. Some say a shot wd40 is good enough too. Fill tank with a treatment of seafoam and fuel. Good to go.
 

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Top off the fuel tank and add stabol or a like fuel stablizer. Seafoam is a cleaner. Then disconnect the fuel vacuum petcock (rubber vacuum hose on the back left). Let the bike run till it quits. That will drain the standing fuel from the carbs and won't let fuel to turn into varnish. Should be fine for the six months. When you are ready to ride just hook up the vacuum line and go for a ride. Anyway, that's the way I do it.
 

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I'm with shnev on the prodedure. You can throw a little seafoam in the gas when you start up if you're worried.
 

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how about i fly down and ride the bike for the summer for you
I will think about. I am afraid that will take me a very long time, but I will think about. And, I tend to be selectively forgetful when I choose, ha.

Thanks guys, I will top her off and use some sort of fuel treatment. I like the idea of disconnecting the auto fuel valve running the carbs dry. I may use WD-40 with a straw and crank the motor afterwards to fog the cylinders or maybe I can take the spark plugs out and sprayor do both.

I will probably store the bike outside under a cover. How sad. Summer humidity and condensation probably should be too much of a problem, but I have seen large heavy mass items (generator motors)that constantly drip due to the temperature retention and condensation, and there is no water source.
 

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stored my GL1500 at my sisters in Oregon for 10 months with the following procedure. It started like it had been run the week before.

1. right before storage with near empty tank fill with premium; preferably no alcohol
2. add stabil, run for a few minutes to insure additive laced fuel is into carbs. (do not drain carbs. I've done it both ways and had problems from draining due to small amounts of fuel left behind)
3. change the oil.
4. add battery tender.

wait 3 or 5 or 7 or 10 months.

1. check tires
2. check oil
3. remove batt tender
4. start normally.
5. set air in suspension
6. ride away.
 
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