Steve Saunders Goldwing Forums banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
imported post

Well this weekend is now over, and I'm sore! But I got a lot done. I want to thank everyone who stepped forward to help me getting the radiator out of my bike when I got stuck - I've documented it all for anyone else who may need help (see the bottom of this posting).

The bad news: I didn't touch any electricals this weekend. The good news: I got lots of other stuff done.

This weekend I:

Flushed cooling system and replaced coolant
Replaced radiator hoses
Replaced rear brake lines with braided stainless
Replaced brake shoes
Rebuilt rear master cylinder
Rebuilt rear caliper
Replaced all rubber grommets
Replaced air filter
Install hard-wired trickle charger
Lubricated side stand and center stand
Cleaned everything

I also found four very loose nuts: The jam/lock nut on the kickstand had backed off and was almost gone (tightend and loc-tited it), the nut holding the left exhaust to the frame next to the rear wheel was not even finger-tight (tightened it), a nut holding the left rear passenger footboard was backed off and almost gone (tightened it), and the upper right nut holding the radiator in place was gone (replaced both upper nuts with locknuts). Because of this, I plan to go over the entire bike front to back, top to bottom, and check every nut and bolt for looseness.

Remaining things to do:

Replace handgrips
Replace front tire
Drain and fill rear drive gear oil
Disassemble and lubricate rear drive spline
Grease pinion gear
Add trunk rack
Replace windshield with taller, wraparound windshield
Add sidestand warning light
Replace flasher with solid state unit for future LED's
Synchronize carburetors
Replace front and rear wheel bearings
Install brake light flasher module

I know this list seems to continually grow, but I do think I'm finally nearing the end, and I think if I spend a couple nights this week working on it, I may be able to finish it all this next weekend. I've got all the parts I need except for the windshield, which I expect to order tomorrow, and the front tire, which I think I may defer for a few months. Oh, and the trunk rack, which I think I may put off indefinitely, simply because I don't think I really need it right now.

I bought a brake light flasher module on eBay. I had a different one before, but it failed, so I took it out. The wiring is still there to put it in, so it should be a simple thing to install this one. I also have some new, improved LED brake lights on order that are supposed to be 5 times brighter than the ones I have in there now, which is always a good thing.

And last, but certainly not least...as promised, I've documented everything I did along the way, so that anyone who wants to attempt it in the future can at least see how I managed to stumble my way through.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
imported post

Oh, one more thing...I started the bike up today (to flush the cooling system) for the first time since I put her away last fall for the winter. REALLY made me want to finish up all this maintenance and get out and ride!!! Instead of a disassembled hulk, I've now got a running motorcycle!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
imported post

Unfortunately...that's one of the things I didn't take pictures of as I did it. Replacing the lines is more or less straightforward though - make sure you first have new copper crush washers (two per fitting). Drain the old lines (easily done if you have a MityVac - just suck the fluid out from the caliper end until you get air). Unbolt the old lines from the caliper and master cylinder. Pull the old lines out, put the new lines in the same place, bolt them in using the old bolts and new crush washers.

The front (on mine) has a splitter at the bottom of the fairing - one line runs from the master cylinder to the splitter, then two lines from the splitter, one to each front caliper. Linked brake systems will be different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,235 Posts
imported post

Dude... you rock!

As a teacher, who often formats material for web and LAN delivery, do not think for one moment I do not understand how tedious and time consuming this sort of thing is. Making online tutorials is tedious... yours look good! What a resource!

I've hit your site a time or two and the illustrated step by steps are awesome!

Your posting of the entire 1500 service manual is very helpful to me. Scanning all that in PDF is real WORK. I have a HP Scanner here that will handle the documents like a copier, scanning both sides automatically, exporting them as scrolling PDF files... but something that size would still take me days to manage, compress and post.

Fine job! Saaa-lute!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,871 Posts
imported post

Good stuff fella. Easy to document and a wealth of help to others. If that aint worth a Guru, I don't know what is. For guys that have never attempted such jobs, you sure have made it easy for them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
imported post

GS, I do understand writing and taking pictures is alot of work. You have done a great job.

I guess my question is whether you have to disassemble the fairing to change the front brake hoses? Are you still going to have a dual banjo connection?

That is what I would like to know and see.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
imported post

sandcastcb750 wrote:
GS, I do understand writing and taking pictures is alot of work. You have done a great job.

I guess my question is whether you have to disassemble the fairing to change the front brake hoses? Are you still going to have a dual banjo connection?

That is what I would like to know and see.
You do not have to disassemble the fairing. If you follow the brake hoses up from the front calipers, you will see there is a flat piece of plastic that blocks off part of the space between the fairing and the forks. This plastic piece is held in place with two screws that are accessed by reaching down from the top of the fairing, in front of the front forks (use a stubby screwdriver). Once you have removed this piece of plastic, you will see that it is actually covering up the brake line splitter (which is basically a tube held in place with fittings on each side)

The brake lines that I purchased (this kit) are exact replacements for the OEM hoses. The front consists of three lines, the rear is one.

There is one line that comes down from the master cylinder on the handlebars. This line fastens on the end of the splitter on the outer right side. Underneath its banjo fitting is another banjo fitting, which is the line that runs to the right caliper. Underneath that second banjo fitting is the splitter itself, so the right side has an extra long banjo bolt, so that it can fit through both banjo fittings and into the splitter. Three crush washers are used - between the outer banjo fitting and the head of the bolt, between the two banjo fittings, and between the inner banjo fitting and the splitter.

On the other end of the splitter is a single banjo fitting, which connects the line that runs to the left caliper. Two crush washers for that one - one between the bolt head and the banjo fitting, and one between the banjo fitting and the splitter.

I drained all the lines, then removed the old rubber lines. I fastened the line to the master cylinder loosely, and both lines to the calipers tightly. Working from under the front of the fairing, I then fastened the left caliper to the splitter, tightly.

Next I threaded onto the long banjo bolt a crush washer, the master cylinder banjo fitting, another crush washer, the right caliper banjo fitting, and another crush washer. I then threaded that banjo bolt into the right side of the splitter, got the brake lines aligned properly, and tightened the banjo bolt.

Last, I tightened the banjo bolt on the master cylinder, then replaced the plastic fairing piece with its two screws.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
imported post

I believe all of the 1982 brake hoses have banjo connections; so the picture of the VENCO hoses are generic, as they show a threaded connections?

The 1983 with metal lines have threaded connections, though.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,929 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
imported post

sandcastcb750 wrote:
I believe all of the 1982 brake hoses have banjo connections; so the picture of the VENCO hoses are generic, as they show a threaded connections?

The 1983 with metal lines have threaded connections, though.
Yup - you're absolutely right - they use the same picture for every kit. All 82 connections are banjo fittings, there are no threaded fittings.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top